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By Allison Eatough and For The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Gone are the days when factory-produced food went unquestioned. In the age of GMOs and climate change theories, a growing number of consumers are demanding to know how their food gets from the ground to their dinner plates, and local farmers are ready with answers. Whether they are reducing pesticide use, raising animals in pastures instead of confinement or rotating crops to keep the soil healthy, an increasing number of Harford County farmers are taking steps to protect the environment while running a healthy, thriving farm.
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NEWS
By Allison Eatough and For The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Gone are the days when factory-produced food went unquestioned. In the age of GMOs and climate change theories, a growing number of consumers are demanding to know how their food gets from the ground to their dinner plates, and local farmers are ready with answers. Whether they are reducing pesticide use, raising animals in pastures instead of confinement or rotating crops to keep the soil healthy, an increasing number of Harford County farmers are taking steps to protect the environment while running a healthy, thriving farm.
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NEWS
By Rebecca Long and Rebecca Long,Frederick News-Post | November 30, 1993
FREDERICK -- He's into movies -- not actually a movie star -- but playing an important role in entertaining and educational films.Frederick's Robert Rooy has been an independent filmmaker for 20 years, producing successful works for everyone, including farmers involved in sustainable agriculture.Mr. Rooy is well qualified to make such videos. He grew up in Iowa on a farm and is familiar with rural living. The free-lance assistant director of feature motion pictures and films for television also has quite a list of credits to his name.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
A second straight winter of unnaturally warm weather so far in Central Maryland is extending the life of a handful of crops at one Howard County farm and forcing a rite of spring to occur early. Only last week on the rolling pastures of Sharp's at Waterford Farm in Brookeville, lambs cavorted near their mothers. Ears of viable popcorn lay scattered amid flattened, yellowed cornstalks. Nearby, brussels sprouts remained ripe for the picking. Still, even in the mildest of these colder months, farm-fresh foods remain scarce.
NEWS
December 18, 2005
Future Harvest, a Chesapeake alliance for sustainable agriculture, will hold its annual "Farming for Profit and Stewardship" conference Jan. 13-14 at the Four Points Sheraton in Hagerstown. The conference will feature workshops, seminars, and a membership meeting and election of board members. Preconference seminars will be held from 10 a.m. to noon Jan. 13 on "Value-Added Products: How Am I Going to Sell All This Stuff?" and "Taking Research Into Your Own Hands." The conference begins at 1:30 p.m. Jan. 13 with seminars on "Pheasant Hill Farm: Our Story" and "Small is (Not Necessarily)
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 6, 2012
Urban farming guru Will Allen will be in B'more Wednesday (3/7) to speak about sustainable agriculture and the challenges ahead.  Allen, son of a sharecropper and a former professional basketball player with the Baltimore Bullets (now the Wizards), is founder and CEO of Growing Power  Inc., a farm and community food center in Milwaukee.  His efforts have earned him numerous awards and recognition, including a MacArthur "genius" grant in 2008. His lecture and signing of a new book, On the Nature of Food , will be at 12:15 p.m. at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe St.  His appearance is sponsored by Hopkins' Center for a Livable Future .
NEWS
December 21, 2003
Sustainable agriculture conference Jan. 16, 17 Future Harvest -- Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture will hold its fifth annual conference, "Farming for Profit and Stewardship," on Jan. 16 and 17 at Four Points Sheraton in Hagerstown. Check-in and registration will begin at noon Jan. 16. An opening session will begin at 1:30 p.m. with presentations on "Successful Farming and "New Markets, New Generations and New Technology." A Future Harvest membership meeting will be held at 3:30 p.m. Jan. 16, followed by networking, dinner and a panel discussion on successful farming enterprises in the Mid-Atlantic region.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | May 28, 1994
On his farm in the lovely, rolling countryside of northwestern Harford County, Scott Nevin wants to build condos in the name of perpetuating ecologically sound agriculture.If that sounds radical, well, talk to Nevin for a while and you may end up wondering whether it's not the rest of the world that's gone a little crazy.It was 1950 when he and his wife, Sally, moved here from Middle River to rear seven kids in the oddly long, rectangular farmhouse.The home once was a duplex, and Scott and Sally lived on separate sides.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2002
Four dozen people from Northeast rural enclaves stepped off a bus yesterday in search of agricultural know-how. They were visiting Howard County, where no land is zoned "agricultural." What attracted them was the nature of Howard's suburbs, where farmers ply their trade on thousands of acres tucked between subdivisions. The out-of-towners from growing places hoped to catch a glimpse of the future for their communities - and how to handle it. "We're further down the timeline in development than some of the regions we work with; there's lessons to be learned in land use and encroachment," said Ginger Myers, agricultural marketing specialist for the Howard County Economic Development Authority.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | July 20, 2009
One student butchered a sheep for her senior project. Another went on to study animal husbandry. Still more found work on vegetable farms. Professor Hugh Pocock taught them all, not at a land grant university but at Maryland Institute College of Art. For reasons ranging from highbrow theories of art and social justice to booming farmers' markets, young people with no background in agriculture are going into the field. And quite a few of them are artists. "A lot of us didn't set out to farm for a living, to have that be what we did all day," said Greg Strella, 24, who came to MICA to become a sculptor and graduated a farmer.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 6, 2012
Urban farming guru Will Allen will be in B'more Wednesday (3/7) to speak about sustainable agriculture and the challenges ahead.  Allen, son of a sharecropper and a former professional basketball player with the Baltimore Bullets (now the Wizards), is founder and CEO of Growing Power  Inc., a farm and community food center in Milwaukee.  His efforts have earned him numerous awards and recognition, including a MacArthur "genius" grant in 2008. His lecture and signing of a new book, On the Nature of Food , will be at 12:15 p.m. at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe St.  His appearance is sponsored by Hopkins' Center for a Livable Future .
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | July 20, 2009
One student butchered a sheep for her senior project. Another went on to study animal husbandry. Still more found work on vegetable farms. Professor Hugh Pocock taught them all, not at a land grant university but at Maryland Institute College of Art. For reasons ranging from highbrow theories of art and social justice to booming farmers' markets, young people with no background in agriculture are going into the field. And quite a few of them are artists. "A lot of us didn't set out to farm for a living, to have that be what we did all day," said Greg Strella, 24, who came to MICA to become a sculptor and graduated a farmer.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | January 13, 2008
Some of the best minds in agriculture will be offering their predictions for the year ahead during the U.S. Department of Agriculture's annual outlook forum, a two-day event starting Feb. 21. Speakers will also discuss the trends in agriculture and farm policies. There will be addresses by two of the top officials at the USDA - the secretary and the chief economist. Because both positions are filled by acting replacements, the USDA said it is too soon to say who will be giving the talks.
NEWS
December 24, 2006
Conference set on sustainable farming The Future Harvest Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture will hold its eighth annual "Farming for Profit and Stewardship" conference Jan. 12 and 13 at the Four Points Sheraton in Hagerstown. Participants will learn strategies for improving production, ways to market products and ideas for new enterprises through 20 seminars offered over two days. On Jan. 12, seminars will be held from 8:30 a.m. to noon on grazing, vegetable production and small fruits and berries; and from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on crop rotation for organic farmers and producing for a farmers' market.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | December 24, 2006
It's farm economics 101: Farming is a business, and it needs to make money to survive. Perhaps one of the best examples of this is Maryland's dairy industry. Monthly milk checks too low to cover the cost of production, pay the mortgage and put food on the table is a primary reason for the continued decline of the state's dairy industry. Since 1990, nearly a third of Maryland's dairy farmers have succumbed to the financial pinch, sold their cows and gone out of business. With this in mind, state Agriculture Secretary Lewis R. Riley says repeatedly, "The best agriculture land preservation program is a profitable farm."
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | December 10, 2006
A growing number of health-conscious consumers are turning to beef, poultry, pork and other meats coming from pasture-raised livestock, and more Maryland farmers are striving to satisfy those appetites. The demand for grass-fed beef, lamb and other products has risen about 10 percent the past two years, according to Theo Weening, national meat coordinator for Whole Foods Market, the Austin, Texas-based company that identifies itself as the world's leading retailer of natural and organic foods.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | December 10, 2006
A growing number of health-conscious consumers are turning to beef, poultry, pork and other meats coming from pasture-raised livestock, and more Maryland farmers are striving to satisfy those appetites. The demand for grass-fed beef, lamb and other products has risen about 10 percent the past two years, according to Theo Weening, national meat coordinator for Whole Foods Market, the Austin, Texas-based company that identifies itself as the world's leading retailer of natural and organic foods.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | December 10, 2006
A growing number of health-conscious consumers are turning to beef, poultry, pork and other meats coming from pasture-raised livestock, and more Maryland farmers are striving to satisfy those appetites. The demand for grass-fed beef, lamb and other products has risen about 10 percent the past two years, according to Theo Weening, national meat coordinator for Whole Foods Market, the Austin, Texas-based company that identifies itself as the world's leading retailer of natural and organic foods.
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