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By DAVID H. BRITTON | October 28, 1992
Each morning the welders, fitters and other craftsmen streamed down Bethlehem boulevard on their way to another oppressive day, passing only a few yards from him as he stood there in the shadow of the overpass next to the steel wasteland.None of them heard the strains from his bagpipe. Amid weeds choked with dust and slag, he played his silent melody to usher in the day shift, like his Scottish cousins who sent their warriors off to the fray.This bagpiper in T-shirt and shorts practicing his instrument outside the entrance to BethShip's Sparrows Point yard seemed out of place; but it was summertime down the shipyard, where few details are precisely ordered.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The challenge was to design a garden that evoked the familiar phrase “Color my world.” It sounds simple - gardens are nothing if not colorful. Carroll Landscaping owner Robert Jones and his designer, Beth Burnham, of Baltimore County chose the color green. Then they turned the challenge inside out. “We like thinking a little bit outside of the box,” says Burnham with a shy smile. Their garden would not be green as in “shades of.” It would be green as in recycled, reclaimed and repurposed - a sustainable garden.
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FEATURES
By Newsday | November 15, 1992
To hear Judith Ivey tell it, she needs television to give her the celebrity to sustain her theatrical career."In the theater now, there's more casting emphasis on celebrity than ability," says Ms. Ivey, who this season joined the cast of CBS' "Designing Women."She plays former court reporter B. J. Poteet, a rich Texas widow who buys into Sugarbakers, the series' Atlanta-based interior-design business. Ms. Ivey, a native Texan, finds it amusing she now has to employ a Texas accent after having worked so hard to be rid of it.Ms.
NEWS
September 9, 2014
President Barack Obama plans to address the nation tomorrow to lay out his strategy for defeating ISIS, the radical Islamist group whose gruesome beheadings and mass killings have terrorized tens of thousands of Iraqi and Syrian civilians in the areas it controls. The actions he is expected to propose will take time to work and require strong American leadership to build the kind of broad-based coalition needed to confront ISIS' battle-hardened militants. But they are also the result of a realistic assessment of the threat, and they can succeed given a sustained commitment to finish the job on the part of the U.S. and its allies.
NEWS
December 9, 2005
Every year, more than 2 million Americans fall and sustain serious injuries. Such injuries are a serious health problem among the elderly.
NEWS
March 3, 2006
Did you know?--About 1.5 million Americans sustain a traumatic brain injury each year. - Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
NEWS
November 3, 1998
An article in The Sun yesterday incorrectly stated the number of seats the Republican Party would have to gain in today's election to sustain a filibuster in the state Senate against a reapportionment plan. To sustain a filibuster in the Senate normally takes at least 16 votes, but maintaining filibusters against redistricting plans require 19 votes under Senate rules.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 11/03/98
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley | October 3, 1999
1 Wake up the linebackers. Carolina will test this young unit, running wide and looking for big plays on screens.2 Keep focused. The Redskins have a recent history of playing down to inferior clubs.3 Sustain longer drives. The less time the Redskins play defense, the better.
NEWS
July 11, 1995
Congratulations to Columbia's Kiwanis Club for pulling off the city's annual Fourth of July celebration a week ago amid trying circumstances. The club's triumph is that much more impressive given the fact that its membership includes only eight people. Of course, there were hundreds of volunteers who gave their time and energy to direct traffic, collect parking fees and clean up afterward. Despite the weather, which kept people away during the early entertainment portion of the event, it was a qualified success.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | July 22, 1992
Unable to raise enough money to sustain its annual budget, the Maryland chapter of the National Conference of Christians and Jews (NCCJ) has ended 65 years of interfaith leadership.People both in and outside the organization saw its disbanding as a sad loss yesterday for interreligious cooperation."It's very discouraging that the kind of interfaith work we saw as so important isn't perceived by the community to be something to support," said Rabbi Ira J. Schiffer of Baltimore's Beth Am Synagogue, one of three clergymen on the 24-member board.
SPORTS
September 3, 2014
Weeks after falling awkwardly against the Dallas Cowboys and coughing up blood, Ravens starting cornerback Jimmy Smith proclaimed that he's made a full recovery. Smith suffered a chest contusion against the Cowboys and also had lung issues, but has been practicing since last week and says he's on track to play Sunday against the Cincinnati Bengals at M&T Bank Stadium. Smith said he won't need any extra padding to protect his chest. "I'm absolutely fine," said Smith, who's not listed on the first injury report released Wednesday.
NEWS
By Chris Soto | August 11, 2014
Every so often, there is reason to cheer a little louder both within the gates of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn., and 350 miles down Interstate 95 at the U.S. Coast Guard headquarters in Washington, D.C. This year, the academy had a banner admissions class, enrolling 256 highly qualified, bright-eyed cadets who took their oaths of office under a beautiful New England summer sky on June 30th. The group, not including international cadets, boasts an average GPA of 3.87 and includes 214 varsity letter earners, numerous class presidents and many other talented young people who will lead our great nation into the next generation.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
More than 50 Maryland middle-schools students have been building a house during a summer camp in Annapolis - not a routine task for teens and preteens. "I came here skeptical," acknowledged JJ Jennings, 13, a rising eighth-grader at the Key School in Annapolis. "Why am I paying to do labor?" To be fair, the house is a small-scale project - 210 square feet and sitting on trailer in the Key School parking lot. But that doesn't mean it's a not a big deal. Complete with solar panels and a rainwater filtration system, the compact home is designed to have the smallest possible carbon footprint.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 3, 2014
We are coming up on the first anniversary of Baltimore's 300 Men March, when far more than that number of men - perhaps double that number - walked the length of North Avenue and back on a Friday night to protest last summer's spike in killings. It was a quickly organized event in response to a particularly sickening period in the life of the city. More than 40 people had been shot in the first couple of weeks of summer, 20 of them in a single weekend. Even with all that - lots of blood on the streets, and lots of urgency in response to it - organizers were surprised by the size of the march.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
The National Aquarium will expand its sustainable seafood efforts with a new endowed program, it announced on Monday. The National Aquarium Sustainable Seafood Program will include enhanced education programs for consumers about sustainable seafood options and will work to expand those options by creating new partnerships between local fishermen and local restaurants, according to the aquarium. Start-up funding for the new program was provided by a gift from the Dana DiCarlo and Scott Plank Family Foundation and their urban development company, War Horse.
NEWS
By Allison Eatough and For The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Gone are the days when factory-produced food went unquestioned. In the age of GMOs and climate change theories, a growing number of consumers are demanding to know how their food gets from the ground to their dinner plates, and local farmers are ready with answers. Whether they are reducing pesticide use, raising animals in pastures instead of confinement or rotating crops to keep the soil healthy, an increasing number of Harford County farmers are taking steps to protect the environment while running a healthy, thriving farm.
NEWS
By Flora Lewis | September 27, 1990
ONCE IN a while somebody comes along with an important, straightforward idea and the dedication and energy to put it to work. Professor Muhammad Yunus, a soft-voiced, 50-year-old economist, is one of them.At the moment, the focus is on macroeconomics: oil prices, inflation, the danger of a worldwide recession that would hurt developed countries and devastate the perpetually poor and the struggling ex-communist states. But even in the last, generally flush decade, the poor were multiplying and seeing no prospects for escape.
NEWS
September 6, 2005
Help farmers pay for ways to curb runoff The swelling size of the bay's dead zone should be a warning that we are not doing enough to address nutrient runoff into the bay ("Oxygen-deprived `dead zone' spreads over 41% of the bay," Aug. 25). The bay is not getting healthier; it's getting worse. Farmers are working hard to do their part, and runoff from farms has been reduced in the last few years. But with more than one-third of the bay unable to sustain life, we must redouble our efforts to reduce runoff from every source.
NEWS
May 28, 2014
In Minnesota Public Radio host Garrison Keillor's mythical town of Lake Woebegone, "all the men are strong, all the women are good-looking, and all the children are above average. " Notwithstanding the statistical improbability of that latter claim, it's at least true of the kids enrolled in the Baltimore City public schools' gifted and talented programs. Whether they're really smarter, or have some special affinity for math or music, or just work harder and stay more focused than their peers really doesn't matter.
NEWS
By Brandi Bottalico, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
Earl Johnson and his neighbors were more serious about emergency preparedness after they experienced a power outage and no running water at the same time a few years ago, he said. "We had elderly people who needed water," he said. "We went to the community association first but they weren't open yet, then we went to a church. " That experience inspired Johnson, now on the Office of Sustainability's Commission on Sustainability, and he taught Baltimore residents how to find and use their resources at a free event hosted by the Baltimore Office of Sustainability Tuesday.
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