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TRAVEL
By Reed Hellman and Reed Hellman,SPECIAL OF THE SUN | May 2, 1999
Standing on Route 1 near Rehoboth, Del., witnessing an ocean of people surge over acres of tax-free outlet stores, you'd never guess that the locals call this place "Slower, Lower Delaware."Sometimes, even a well-mannered beach resort like Rehoboth can seem too hectic. Traveling a slower road through the rest of Delaware's Sussex County can fill more than one weekend with adventure. "Inland Sussex County is the Delaware you never knew," says Millsboro shop owner Pete Marconi. Eight years ago, Marconi's signature T-shirts first publicized the county's calmer approach to life.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Bill Atkinson and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2004
Delaware officials said they found no new cases of the potentially devastating avian influenza yesterday - but that was little comfort to farmers in the poultry-intensive Delmarva peninsula, who are isolating themselves in an effort to keep their livelihoods safe. Also yesterday, Maryland's U.S. senators, Barbara A. Mikulski and Paul S. Sarbanes, asked the nation's agriculture secretary for federal help containing what they called a "potentially catastrophic situation." "Viruses don't recognize state lines," Mikulski said.
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NEWS
February 7, 2001
GEORGETOWN, Del. - Sussex County officials have approved a drastically smaller version of a disputed community that opponents feared would overwhelm crowded roads in Delaware beach towns and threaten fragile inland bays just north of Ocean City. The project, proposed for an 885-acre site just west of Fenwick Island, was to include 2,900 homes and more than 200,000 square feet of commercial space. In a 4-1 to one vote yesterday, the County Council approved 1,700 units and limited commercial development to 170,000 square feet.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2002
OCEAN CITY - Police plan to begin searching public landfills tomorrow for the bodies of a Virginia couple they believe were shot to death in a luxury penthouse nearly a week ago, stuffed into plastic garbage bags and dumped in a trash bin amid the glitzy high-rises of north Ocean City or in nearby Delaware. Visitors and longtime residents alike were baffled yesterday by the killings, the first in more than three years in Ocean City and the first in memory on the northern end of the 10-mile strand.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Bill Atkinson and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2004
Delaware officials said they found no new cases of the potentially devastating avian influenza yesterday - but that was little comfort to farmers in the poultry-intensive Delmarva peninsula, who are isolating themselves in an effort to keep their livelihoods safe. Also yesterday, Maryland's U.S. senators, Barbara A. Mikulski and Paul S. Sarbanes, asked the nation's agriculture secretary for federal help containing what they called a "potentially catastrophic situation." "Viruses don't recognize state lines," Mikulski said.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1999
Perdue Farms Inc. has received approval to build a $10 million chicken waste-processing plant in the Blades-Laurel area of Sussex County, Del., that will help handle the large amounts of waste produced at Eastern Shore poultry facilities.The project, a joint venture of Salisbury-based Perdue and AgriRecycle Inc. of Springfield, Mo., will convert chicken manure into pelletized fertilizer."We consider our chicken producers to be partners in this industry," said Tita Cherrier, a spokeswoman for Perdue.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1996
GEORGETOWN, Del. -- Thousands gathered on the circle in front of the courthouse in this small town yesterday to celebrate Return Day, a festive ceremony that marks the end of the political season and dates to Colonial days.In a political ritual observed each election year since the late 1700s, Sussex County political leaders buried the hatchet -- literally. Libertarian Jack Dalton, Republican Roland Derrickson and Democrat Myrtle Shockley together grasped a tomahawk before placing it in a wooden box and pouring sand on it."
FEATURES
By Bob Dart and Bob Dart,Cox News Service | January 24, 1993
WAVERLY, Va. -- Compared to the Smithsonian Institution, the museum located catty-cornered from the Dairy Queen in this Tidewater town is just peanuts.But the nation's first (and probably only) peanut museum is located here in Sussex County, where the nation's first commercial crop of peanuts was harvested about 150 years ago."You'd be surprised at how many visitors we get," said Lucye Hughes, widow of a Planters Peanuts executive and a volunteer at the tiny museum.Most folks tend to associate peanuts with Georgia, and the Peach State produces nearly half the nation's peanuts -- much more than any other state.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2002
GEORGETOWN, Del. - Nearly a year after Georgetown's mayor complained about a wave of Hispanic immigrants, landlords have gone to federal court, charging officials in this historic town with a campaign of harassment and discrimination. The landlords, who insist the town has stepped up housing inspections by targeting houses and apartments rented by Hispanics, filed suit last month when the town tripled the yearly licensing fee for each rental unit from $50 to $150 - half the $300 fee the Town Council had considered.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2000
GEORGETOWN, Del. - Two days earlier, Republican Sen. William V. Roth Jr.'s 30-year career in Congress had ended in a crushing defeat at the hands of Democratic Gov. Thomas R. Carper. But Roth never gave a thought to being anywhere yesterday but riding in a horse-drawn antique carriage with Carper as Delaware celebrated Sussex County Return Day - one of the oldest political events in the nation. Every two years, on the second day after the general election, Delaware politicians - winners and losers, from the governor to county clerk - gather with citizens in this historic county seat to hear the Sussex County returns proclaimed by a town crier and to feast on such delicacies as roast ox and fried oysters.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2002
GEORGETOWN, Del. - Nearly a year after Georgetown's mayor complained about a wave of Hispanic immigrants, landlords have gone to federal court, charging officials in this historic town with a campaign of harassment and discrimination. The landlords, who insist the town has stepped up housing inspections by targeting houses and apartments rented by Hispanics, filed suit last month when the town tripled the yearly licensing fee for each rental unit from $50 to $150 - half the $300 fee the Town Council had considered.
NEWS
February 7, 2001
GEORGETOWN, Del. - Sussex County officials have approved a drastically smaller version of a disputed community that opponents feared would overwhelm crowded roads in Delaware beach towns and threaten fragile inland bays just north of Ocean City. The project, proposed for an 885-acre site just west of Fenwick Island, was to include 2,900 homes and more than 200,000 square feet of commercial space. In a 4-1 to one vote yesterday, the County Council approved 1,700 units and limited commercial development to 170,000 square feet.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2001
DEWEY BEACH, DEL. - For Mayor Robert G. Frederick, the debate about the breakneck pace of development in Sussex County becomes clear in a 20-minute drive from his little beach town up through the commercial smorgasbord of 200 outlet stores, strip centers, big-box retailers and fast-food restaurants that is Route 1. Ten years ago, when he bought a house at the Delaware shore, the same trip took "seven, eight minutes tops," says Frederick. "Route 1 is a nightmare, but that's just part of it. From the environment to our highways, anybody with common sense can see that something has to be done."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2000
GEORGETOWN, Del. - Two days earlier, Republican Sen. William V. Roth Jr.'s 30-year career in Congress had ended in a crushing defeat at the hands of Democratic Gov. Thomas R. Carper. But Roth never gave a thought to being anywhere yesterday but riding in a horse-drawn antique carriage with Carper as Delaware celebrated Sussex County Return Day - one of the oldest political events in the nation. Every two years, on the second day after the general election, Delaware politicians - winners and losers, from the governor to county clerk - gather with citizens in this historic county seat to hear the Sussex County returns proclaimed by a town crier and to feast on such delicacies as roast ox and fried oysters.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2000
FENWICK ISLAND, Del. -- Local activists, municipal leaders and Delaware officials are vowing to block a 2,900-unit golf course community straddling the Maryland-Delaware border just north of Ocean City -- the largest development ever proposed for fast-growing Sussex County. Environmentalists worry about losing Delaware's last remaining coastline on Assawoman Bay. Opponents in the tiny beach town of Fenwick Island and in the "Quiet Resorts" of Rehoboth, Dewey and Bethany say the project will overwhelm the already congested Route 54 -- a vital emergency evacuation route for area beach towns, including north Ocean City.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1999
Perdue Farms Inc. has received approval to build a $10 million chicken waste-processing plant in the Blades-Laurel area of Sussex County, Del., that will help handle the large amounts of waste produced at Eastern Shore poultry facilities.The project, a joint venture of Salisbury-based Perdue and AgriRecycle Inc. of Springfield, Mo., will convert chicken manure into pelletized fertilizer."We consider our chicken producers to be partners in this industry," said Tita Cherrier, a spokeswoman for Perdue.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2000
FENWICK ISLAND, Del. -- Local activists, municipal leaders and Delaware officials are vowing to block a 2,900-unit golf course community straddling the Maryland-Delaware border just north of Ocean City -- the largest development ever proposed for fast-growing Sussex County. Environmentalists worry about losing Delaware's last remaining coastline on Assawoman Bay. Opponents in the tiny beach town of Fenwick Island and in the "Quiet Resorts" of Rehoboth, Dewey and Bethany say the project will overwhelm the already congested Route 54 -- a vital emergency evacuation route for area beach towns, including north Ocean City.
FEATURES
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | July 17, 1992
Rehoboth Beach, Del. -- Slowly, a crane lifts a pink, steel basket, stopping it 140 feet above a crowd of curious spectators.Kathy Spanich, wearing a chest harness attached to a long, heavy-duty elastic cord, stands in the basket, gazing at the horizon. She is nervous.Minutes pass.And then a countdown begins . . . Five-four-three-two-one."Ahhhhh," screams Ms. Spanich as she free falls toward the ground, descending like a spider from its web.Ms. Spanich has just bungee-jumped -- a sport that, in recent years, has grown from being a trendy hobby for a thrill-seeking few to a $40 million-year industry.
TRAVEL
By Reed Hellman and Reed Hellman,SPECIAL OF THE SUN | May 2, 1999
Standing on Route 1 near Rehoboth, Del., witnessing an ocean of people surge over acres of tax-free outlet stores, you'd never guess that the locals call this place "Slower, Lower Delaware."Sometimes, even a well-mannered beach resort like Rehoboth can seem too hectic. Traveling a slower road through the rest of Delaware's Sussex County can fill more than one weekend with adventure. "Inland Sussex County is the Delaware you never knew," says Millsboro shop owner Pete Marconi. Eight years ago, Marconi's signature T-shirts first publicized the county's calmer approach to life.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1996
GEORGETOWN, Del. -- Thousands gathered on the circle in front of the courthouse in this small town yesterday to celebrate Return Day, a festive ceremony that marks the end of the political season and dates to Colonial days.In a political ritual observed each election year since the late 1700s, Sussex County political leaders buried the hatchet -- literally. Libertarian Jack Dalton, Republican Roland Derrickson and Democrat Myrtle Shockley together grasped a tomahawk before placing it in a wooden box and pouring sand on it."
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