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NEWS
March 9, 1992
Volunteers at the Susquehannock Environmental Center in Bel Air wondered for years whether the rest of the world ever would catch up to them.Born in a high school ecology club, Susquehannock is among the oldest continuously operating recycling centers in the nation. It just celebrated its 20th anniversary.When a science teacher named Bob Chance and his eco-club began accepting recyclables from Harford countians in January 1972, they were considered tree-huggers, the counter-culture flakes.
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NEWS
By Matt Kasper and Matt Kasper,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2004
After 32 years of service and recognition as the oldest continuing recycling center in the country, the Susquehannock Environmental Center on North Tollgate Road will close this month. A combination of waning profits, declining service and overall fatigue finally took its toll, causing the board to vote to close the center, said Clifton Dowling, head of the board of directors. "As a board, we're tired," Dowling said after noting that since the country curbside pickup program went into effect in 1994, the center has seen a steady decline of recyclable material.
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NEWS
September 6, 1992
Susquehannock Environmental Center, a non-profit recycling station near Bel Air, will begin accepting mixed paper on Tuesday.Used paper products, including magazines, junk mail, cereal boxes and egg cartons can be dropped off at the center. Susquehannock is at 700 N. Tollgate Road near Harford Mall, just off U.S. 1.The center will continue to accept used newspapers and certain grades of office paper, including computer paper.Susquehannock officials said paper products should be separated by mixed paper, office paper and newspapers.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1999
The last time a large area of Soldiers Delight Natural Environment Area was set on fire was in 1730, when the Susquehannock Indians burned it to flush white-tail deer from the woods. The charred woods gave rise to grasslands, but with the decline of the area's American Indian population, the ecosystem died.Yesterday, in an effort to restore the lost grasslands environmental system and the endangered plants it produces, state Department of Natural Resources officials began burning 100 acres in the western Baltimore County park.
NEWS
September 3, 1995
You can help people paint their homes simply by supplying the paint.Bring usable latex paints in labeled, tightly sealed containers to Kefauver's Lumber Co., 1505 Churchville Road in Bel Air, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today and help supply the paint for this season's fourth and final latex paint recycling program.This year, 540 gallons have been collected. Last year, residents contributed enough paint to fill 500 one-gallon cans.The donated paint will be mixed on site. After being sent to the Loading Dock, a Baltimore-based building material recycler, the paint is distributed free or sold at a low price to low-income housing projects.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 4, 1992
Between 5,000 and 7,000 people in St. Mary's, Charles and Prince George's counties claim Piscataway Indian ancestry, according to Mervin A. Savoy, chairwoman of the Piscataway-Conoy Confederacy."
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1999
The last time a large area of Soldiers Delight Natural Environment Area was set on fire was in 1730, when the Susquehannock Indians burned it to flush white-tail deer from the woods. The charred woods gave rise to grasslands, but with the decline of the area's American Indian population, the ecosystem died.Yesterday, in an effort to restore the lost grasslands environmental system and the endangered plants it produces, state Department of Natural Resources officials began burning 100 acres in the western Baltimore County park.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | June 16, 1991
Julie Thompson had a hard time establishing curbside recycling in her Jarrettsville neighborhood when she left bins for glass, cans and plastic at the dead end of Trout Farm Road."
NEWS
January 8, 1995
Harford County residents can continue the holiday spirit this month by giving something back to Mother Nature through the county government's annual Christmas Tree Recycling Program.More than 47,000 trees have been recycled and about 47,000 cubic yards of county landfill space saved since the program began five years ago.Six collection centers at various sites throughout the county will accept the trees, stripped of decorations, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 14 and Jan. 21. When residents return their trees, they will receive a coupon redeemable in the spring for a free evergreen seedling.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | July 7, 1991
While the county executive prepares to get a large number of Harfordresidents to sort their trash for recycling, a more daunting task lays ahead: finding buyers for the glass, aluminum, paper and other recyclable material collected.The county executive is proposing a voluntary curbside recycling program just as prices plummet for a broadrange of recycled commodities.The countywide program County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann proposed last month could move Harford ahead of other Baltimore-area jurisdictions, which are taking a phased-in approach to meet a state mandate to reduce its waste streams by 1994.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1996
Ashley Laleker is 11 years old, and prefers studying to hiking. Her mother is concerned."She wants to do math and science. I don't know if I want her to do that all summer," said Suzanne Laleker, one of hundreds of parents who came to Catonsville yesterday hoping to find the right camp for their kids. "I want her to hike and go outside."The Lalekers and others at a camp fair on the University of Maryland Baltimore County campus faced a potentially overwhelming range of choices. Science camp or soccer camp?
NEWS
September 3, 1995
You can help people paint their homes simply by supplying the paint.Bring usable latex paints in labeled, tightly sealed containers to Kefauver's Lumber Co., 1505 Churchville Road in Bel Air, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today and help supply the paint for this season's fourth and final latex paint recycling program.This year, 540 gallons have been collected. Last year, residents contributed enough paint to fill 500 one-gallon cans.The donated paint will be mixed on site. After being sent to the Loading Dock, a Baltimore-based building material recycler, the paint is distributed free or sold at a low price to low-income housing projects.
NEWS
January 8, 1995
Harford County residents can continue the holiday spirit this month by giving something back to Mother Nature through the county government's annual Christmas Tree Recycling Program.More than 47,000 trees have been recycled and about 47,000 cubic yards of county landfill space saved since the program began five years ago.Six collection centers at various sites throughout the county will accept the trees, stripped of decorations, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 14 and Jan. 21. When residents return their trees, they will receive a coupon redeemable in the spring for a free evergreen seedling.
NEWS
September 6, 1992
Susquehannock Environmental Center, a non-profit recycling station near Bel Air, will begin accepting mixed paper on Tuesday.Used paper products, including magazines, junk mail, cereal boxes and egg cartons can be dropped off at the center. Susquehannock is at 700 N. Tollgate Road near Harford Mall, just off U.S. 1.The center will continue to accept used newspapers and certain grades of office paper, including computer paper.Susquehannock officials said paper products should be separated by mixed paper, office paper and newspapers.
NEWS
September 6, 1992
From: Geoffrey R. CloseBel AirIn late 1991, County Executive Eileen Rehrmann announced the beginning of curbside recycling in Harford County. The State of Maryland had long since mandated that every county and Baltimore City reduce the never-ending flow of rubbish by 20 percent; only Harford County had failed to adopt an approved recycling plan.After months of exhaustive study and debate, Rehrmann decided that voluntary curbside recycling was the best alternative. Private haulers would collect "blue bags" full of recyclables onceweekly.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | August 23, 1992
Brad MiLton is a man for hire.Need a few cows milked? Want your lawn cut? How about a truckload of mulch? A cord of wood? Any hauling done? You can contact this 19-year-old whirlwind entrepreneur.He can be found most any morning around 11 o'clock stocking his latest venture -- Brad's Produce Stand on Route 22 near Route 543. If you miss him, his employees will gladly furnish one of his business cards.His odyssey in the business world began seven years ago. As a Churchville youngster, he tried playing soccer like most of his friends, but "it just didn't grab me," he said.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | June 30, 1991
The county's long-awaited curbside recycling plan arrived Thursday in a leaky blue plastic bag.County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann demonstrated how Harford residents can begin sorting their garbage intothe blue recyclable bags under the proposal she will send to the County Council Tuesday."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1996
Ashley Laleker is 11 years old, and prefers studying to hiking. Her mother is concerned."She wants to do math and science. I don't know if I want her to do that all summer," said Suzanne Laleker, one of hundreds of parents who came to Catonsville yesterday hoping to find the right camp for their kids. "I want her to hike and go outside."The Lalekers and others at a camp fair on the University of Maryland Baltimore County campus faced a potentially overwhelming range of choices. Science camp or soccer camp?
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 4, 1992
Between 5,000 and 7,000 people in St. Mary's, Charles and Prince George's counties claim Piscataway Indian ancestry, according to Mervin A. Savoy, chairwoman of the Piscataway-Conoy Confederacy."
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | April 19, 1992
Recycling. Traffic. Greyhounds.Those are some of the topics thatwill be featured during next weekend's Earth Day celebration at the Susquehannock Environmental Center near Bel Air.Running from noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday, the celebration will highlight steps anyone can take to make the Earth a better place -- fromcar pooling to adopting a greyhound racing dog.The annual Earth Day celebration also will commemorate the 20th anniversary of Susquehannock, the...
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