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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
A natural gas company has agreed to give $500,000 to monitor water quality in the Susquehanna River basin after a Pennsylvania well blowout last year spilled "fracking" fluids into a tributary of the river, Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler announced Thursday. Gansler had formally threatened to sue Chesapeake Energy Corp. for allegedly endangering the health of Marylanders by the April 2011 spill in Bradford County, Pa. The river supplies drinking water to 6.2 million people and is home to sensitive Chesapeake Bay fish populations of American shad and striped bass, Gansler noted.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
A natural gas company has agreed to give $500,000 to monitor water quality in the Susquehanna River basin after a Pennsylvania well blowout last year spilled "fracking" fluids into a tributary of the river, Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler announced Thursday. Gansler had formally threatened to sue Chesapeake Energy Corp. for allegedly endangering the health of Marylanders by the April 2011 spill in Bradford County, Pa. The river supplies drinking water to 6.2 million people and is home to sensitive Chesapeake Bay fish populations of American shad and striped bass, Gansler noted.
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EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
Editor: I thank The Aegis and Allan Vought for today's (5/18/11) article, "Susquehanna called the most endangered river. " After reading the American River's reasons for this ranking and Susquehanna River Basin Commission response, my question for Mr. Swartz, Executive Director of SRBC, is, "What action will the Commission take to address the impact of hydraulic fracturing on the Susquehanna River?" Mr. Swartz reports that the Commission does not have the legal power to impose a moratorium.
EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
Editor: I thank The Aegis and Allan Vought for today's (5/18/11) article, "Susquehanna called the most endangered river. " After reading the American River's reasons for this ranking and Susquehanna River Basin Commission response, my question for Mr. Swartz, Executive Director of SRBC, is, "What action will the Commission take to address the impact of hydraulic fracturing on the Susquehanna River?" Mr. Swartz reports that the Commission does not have the legal power to impose a moratorium.
NEWS
August 6, 1999
THE GOOD NEWS is that Baltimore's three great reservoirs are more than half full. The bad news is that they are nearly half empty. The really bad news is that state and city officials who should cooperate and exchange expertise in the public interest were bickering and threatening lawsuits, thoroughly confusing the public. But now the really good news is that Baltimore's public works director, George G. Balog, is planning to tap the Susquehanna River for water Monday, just as Gov. Parris N. Glendening had ordered.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2005
PORT DEPOSIT - While walking along this riverfront town's Main Street in September to see firsthand the flood damage from Tropical Storm Ivan, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. turned to Mayor Robert Flayhart and said: "We were lucky. It looks like Port Deposit dodged the bullet, right?" Flayhart agreed. But it was through no kindness of Mother Nature that this 19th-century community escaped the full wrath of the storm. Much of the credit goes to the Susquehanna River Basin Commission, a little-known federal agency on the banks of the Susquehanna River in Harrisburg, Pa., that now faces its own threat - not from rising water, but from federal budget cuts.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 13, 2003
A Harford County group filed suit in federal court yesterday seeking to strike down the Susquehanna River Basin Commission's decision to allow the city of Aberdeen to draw water from a designated scenic stream during emergencies. The Deer Creek Watershed Association, made up primarily of property owners whose land is next to the creek, filed its suit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. The action comes after the city indicated two weeks ago that chemical contamination in several city wells led officials to shut them down late last month, creating an emergency need.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 12, 1999
The Susquehanna River Basin Commission issued a drought warning yesterday for the New York and Pennsylvania portions of the river's watershed. The Maryland portion has been under a drought warning since December.Ground-water levels in the 27,500-square-mile region were reported "dangerously low." The river's flow at Harrisburg was the lowest in 110 years of recordkeeping, and 38 other streams also were setting new lows.The worsening drought "should not be taken lightly," said commission Chairman John Hicks.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 27, 2003
Aberdeen City Manager Peter Dacey says the town planned to begin drawing water from Deer Creek over the weekend under an emergency-use certificate approved this month by state environmental officials. In a document dated July 14, the Susquehanna River Basin Commission - which regulates water use on Susquehanna tributaries - authorized withdrawals of up to 500,000 gallons a day, when available, after the Maryland Department of the Environment declared an emergency because of contamination in Aberdeen's wells.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1998
Stubborn drought in most of the mid-Atlantic states has prompted a call for some Marylanders to conserve water.The Susquehanna River Basin Commission, which regulates use of the big river's water in Pennsylvania, parts of New York and Maryland, issued a drought advisory yesterday for people who get their water from the river or from wells within its drainage basin.The basin covers northern Harford County and parts of Carroll, Baltimore and Cecil counties, and includes Conowingo, Darlington, Port Deposit, Havre de Grace and Perryville, as well as Aberdeen Proving Ground.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2005
PORT DEPOSIT - While walking along this riverfront town's Main Street in September to see firsthand the flood damage from Tropical Storm Ivan, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. turned to Mayor Robert Flayhart and said: "We were lucky. It looks like Port Deposit dodged the bullet, right?" Flayhart agreed. But it was through no kindness of Mother Nature that this 19th-century community escaped the full wrath of the storm. Much of the credit goes to the Susquehanna River Basin Commission, a little-known federal agency on the banks of the Susquehanna River in Harrisburg, Pa., that now faces its own threat - not from rising water, but from federal budget cuts.
NEWS
August 6, 1999
THE GOOD NEWS is that Baltimore's three great reservoirs are more than half full. The bad news is that they are nearly half empty. The really bad news is that state and city officials who should cooperate and exchange expertise in the public interest were bickering and threatening lawsuits, thoroughly confusing the public. But now the really good news is that Baltimore's public works director, George G. Balog, is planning to tap the Susquehanna River for water Monday, just as Gov. Parris N. Glendening had ordered.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2003
A multistate commission that oversees water management for the Susquehanna River is calling on Congress to restore funding for a flood forecasting system that was cut unexpectedly from the House of Representatives' omnibus appropriations bill. The Susquehanna River Basin Commission was told late last month that a $1.3 million line-item appropriation for the program had been eliminated. The money is needed to update aging gauges and other equipment used in its Susquehanna Flood Forecasting and Warning System.
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