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October 9, 2012
The woman whose body was found in the Susquehanna River in Havre de Grace Friday morning was identified Monday as Marie Rocco, 47, with addresses in both Havre de Grace and Vail, Colo. Rocco's body was discovered in the water off Hutchins Park by Havre de Grace Police at about 8:40 a.m. No further information about the cause of death was available, Ofc. Jeff Gilpin said in an e-mail Monday. "As in any death by unknown circumstances, we are treating this as a homicide until, or unless, evidence dictates otherwise," Gilpin said.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
To hear Larry Hogan tell it, the multibillion-dollar effort to clean up the Chesapeake Bay has been a dismal failure - and the biggest problem is getting Pennsylvania and New York to stop sending sediment pollution down the Susquehanna River. The Republican gubernatorial candidate vows to "stand up" for Maryland farmers, watermen and homeowners, who he contends have been unfairly burdened with the bay's restoration, and says he'd take the other states to court if necessary to get them to do more.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 13, 2000
The search for a man reported missing in the Susquehanna River north of Port Deposit since Sunday was called off last night and was to resume today. Nelson Stauffer and Brent M. Horst, both of Ephrata, Pa., were fishing off Bird Island about 6 p.m. when their outboard-powered boat began filling with water and sinking, said John Surrick, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Surrick said Horst, 22, was rescued by boaters but that Stauffer, about 25, could not be found.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 9, 2014
Legislators from Maryland and Pennsylvania sparred at a hearing in Annapolis Monday over whether their states are doing too much or too little to reduce Chesapeake Bay pollution. In a U.S. Senate subcommittee hearing called to review the new bay restoration agreement, Maryland state Sen. Steve Hershey complained about the "astronomical cost" of cleaning up the ailing estuary, calling it an "unfunded mandate" from the federal government. Maryland's share has been estimated at nearly $15 billion through 2025, he noted.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 15, 1999
The body of an unidentified woman was pulled from the Susquehanna River in Harford County yesterday, a spokeswoman for the Department of Natural Resources said.Two fishermen, Frank D. Gallucci of Oxford, Pa., and Steve Miller, a retired police officer from Rising Sun, discovered the body shortly before 10 a.m. about a mile downstream from the mouth of Broad Creek and notified authorities.Susan O'Brien, a Department of Natural Resources spokeswoman, said the body was pulled from the water at 10: 32 a.m.O'Brien said the body is believed to be that of a white female, 20 to 40 years old, wearing blue jeans and a black Hard Rock Cafe T-shirt.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1998
YORK, Pa. -- If Baltimore continues to have unrestricted access to water from the Susquehanna River, marina owner Byron R. Young fears for the river's future."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2002
ABERDEEN - A deepening drought in the Susquehanna River basin may soon force golf courses, power plants and other big water users in the three-state watershed to cut their usage, find alternate sources or pay hefty fees for the river water. Susquehanna River Basin commission officials said yesterday that if flow rates in the 444-mile-long river continue to fall, the commission would move to impose curbs on major consumers and move to seek water releases from upstream reservoirs. "Up until two or three weeks ago, the main stem [of the river]
NEWS
May 8, 2005
Last week, we asked what environmental concerns you have about the health of the Susquehanna River and what you think area governments should be doing about the river. Here are readers' views: Displaced soil creates muddy river Contrary to what Julie Oberg of the Maryland Department of the Environment says regarding the Susquehanna River - "It's fine for fishing; it's fine for swimming" - I totally disagree. About one month ago, shortly after Easter, my husband and I were traveling up Route 40 between Edgewood and Havre de Grace.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | December 16, 2007
In the latest response to the impact that months of dry weather have had on water supplies, Harford County will change the source of its water supply this week from Loch Raven Reservoir to the Susquehanna River. Residents should not notice any change in the quality or taste of their water but might see a slight increase in their quarterly bills, county officials said. Starting Tuesday, water will be diverted from the river through pumps at Deer Creek for the first time in almost six years.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2004
PORT DEPOSIT -- This historic Susquehanna River town will take a big step toward becoming a Cecil County tourist attraction tomorrow when it begins advertising for bids on the construction for a long-planned restoration of its waterfront property. Plans call for the development of a waterfront park and marina and reconstruction of a jetty that the Navy built during World War II. Sailors attending boot camp at the Bainbridge Naval Training Center, on a plateau above town, would pack the pier, waiting to clamber into one of the more than 100 whaleboats docked there so they could practice maneuvers up and down the river.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
There weren't any keepers yet, but the fish were definitely biting for Willie Edwards one day last week as he trolled along the edge of the Susquehanna Flats. The 72-year-old fisherman from North East said he'd caught "a lot of little rock," or striped bass. The Flats - a vast, grass-covered shoal at the mouth of the Susquehanna River - are a magnet for fish and the anglers who pursue them. But they're also a symbol to scientists of the Chesapeake Bay's resilience, and of its ability to rebound, if given a chance, from decades of pollution and periodic battering by storms.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 27, 2014
Water rescue teams pulled two people out of the Susquehanna River near Conowingo Dam after reports of a missing kayaker early afternoon on Memorial Day. Rescue personnel and watercraft were staged along the river south of the dam near the Rock Run Road area in Susquehanna State Park, according to monitored Harford County emergency radio broadcasts shortly before 12:30 p.m. The two people were rescued at about 1:30 p.m. and taken to Lapidum Landing,...
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 21, 2014
Two new sites have been added to Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway's 14th annual River Sweep, a volunteer shoreline and roadside clean-up in honor of Earth Day, that takes place on April 26 from 9 a.m. to noon, rain or shine. The National Historic Tome School, on what was the Bainbridge Naval Training Center in Port Deposit, is a new location this year, as is Conowingo Creek Boat Launch in Conowingo. Other River Sweep sites include locations in Havre de Grace, Perryville, Port Deposit and Garrett Island.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
Wilbur L. Iley, a decorated World War II veteran who worked in the Harford County dairy industry for many years, died Monday of cancer at the Forest Hill Medical and Rehabilitation Center. The Fallston resident was 94. Mr. Iley was born on his family's farm off Grier Nursery Road in Street and was a 1937 graduate of Highland High School. He worked on the 70-acre farm until he entered military service in the Army during World War II. Family members said he was an expert marksman; he attained the rank of master sergeant.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | November 15, 2013
The Harford County Department of Public Works' Water and Sewer Division will temporarily switch water sources at the Abingdon Water Treatment Plant from the usual supply originating at Loch Raven Reservoir to the Susquehanna River behind Conowingo Dam. The switch will occur during the evening of Monday, Nov. 18. DPW will start treating the Susquehanna water through the treatment plant on the morning of Tuesday, Nov. 19. Once the switch has...
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Letter to the Aegis | July 18, 2013
Welcome to Tax Hell!  Marylanders are suffering under a deluge of taxes and fees.  More than 40 taxes and fee increases have been forced upon the people in the last 8 years.  The latest and dumbest is the "Rain Tax. "  The "Rain Tax" is projected to confiscate more than 14 billion dollars from family budgets and the State's economy.  Those funds could be used for education, public safety, and transportation rather than fighting against a misleading problem...
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | April 6, 2008
Ann S. Persson ran her hand gently across a primitive sunburst design carved into rock thousands of years ago. She traced lines radiating from the center to the rock's edge. "It's like touching history, our connection from the past to the present," said Persson, curator of the Havre de Grace Maritime Museum, which today opens an exhibit of ancient rock art, known as petroglyphs. Charlie Hall, the state's terrestrial archaeologist, will introduce the collection of rocks that he called "powerful communications devices" that date back about 4,000 years.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | November 15, 2013
The Harford County Department of Public Works' Water and Sewer Division will temporarily switch water sources at the Abingdon Water Treatment Plant from the usual supply originating at Loch Raven Reservoir to the Susquehanna River behind Conowingo Dam. The switch will occur during the evening of Monday, Nov. 18. DPW will start treating the Susquehanna water through the treatment plant on the morning of Tuesday, Nov. 19. Once the switch has...
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Editorial from The Aegis and The Record | June 11, 2013
Get ready to help pay for road construction elsewhere in Maryland. The tolls are going up at the state Transportation Authority's two Susquehanna River bridges - I-95 and Route 40 - and it's pretty clear the money will be used to subsidize projects like the InterCounty Connector that serves commuters in the Washington, D.C., suburbs. Starting July 1, the cost to cross the Susquehanna using either the Route 40 Hatem bridge or the I-95 Tydings bridge will increase from $6 for a round trip to $8 for a round trip.
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June 5, 2013
As taken from the pages of The Aegis dated Thursday, June 6, 1963: Fortune telling became a criminal offense in Harford County this week in 1963. A bill approved in the Maryland General Assembly became effective on June 1. The bill called for a fine of between $25 and $500 or imprisonment up to 60 days or both upon conviction. The law said any person in Harford County who shall ask, demand, charge or accept any gratuity for forecasting, foretelling or for pretending to forecast or foretell the future of another by cards, palm reading or any other scheme, practice or device shall be guilty.
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