Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSushi Bar
IN THE NEWS

Sushi Bar

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 1998
Maguro in Glen Burnie is something of a rarity. It's a sushi bar that doesn't pretend to be anything else. There are just a few cooked items on the menu, not counting the cooked toppings for sushi - smoked eel, steamed shrimp and little omelets folded into neat bundles. What you will find here is exquisitely fresh, artfully prepared sushi and, if you must, Korean food through a surprising arrangement with an adjacent restaurant.Sushi chef and owner Pong Yang and his wife, Angela, opened Maguro in February.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
On a sunny Saturday afternoon, Kate Williams stood behind the sushi bar at Pabu in Harbor East's Four Seasons Hotel, concentrating as she carefully wrapped a bamboo mat around rice-strewn seaweed. Chef Jonah Kim, the executive chef at Pabu, stood next to Williams, offering her guidance and casually chatting with a dozen would-be sushi chefs sitting on the other side of the sushi bar. When finished, Williams lifted her creation in the air with a smile. Pabu's Sushi 101 class - a combination of lecture, hands-on experimentation and afternoon snack - is one of several that has recently popped up around the Baltimore area.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 6, 1996
Imo yaki (potatoes with butter). My kind of sushi. Of course, it's not really sushi; but it is something you can order from Minato's sushi bar menu.If you're like me, you've sworn off raw fish. (Although I can't resist a raw oyster every now and then, I feel more comfortable if they're farm raised.) But I miss the exotic flavors and contrasting textures, the subtle pleasures of sushi. The sticky rice, the distinctive taste of nori (dried seaweed), the delicate smoothness and briny sweetness of superbly fresh fish, accompanied by the sharp sting of wasabi (Japanese horseradish)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
Matsuri opened in 1996. I place this in the second wave of Baltimore's sushi experience, when Japanese restaurants began to look as much like the pub next door as the tatami and shoji-screen stage sets of the first wave. Some old-school rituals are in place (diners receive hot cloth towels upon arrival). Some aren't (the hot tea is made from tea bags). I've returned to Matsuri a handful of times over the years, and I'm never disappointed. On the other hand, I've never had my socks knocked off there either, except for once, a lavish birthday dinner (not my own)
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 29, 1998
TODAY'S CULINARY topic is: How to make sushi.I happen to be an expert on this topic, because I recently put in a stint as a chef at an actual sushi restaurant. (One of the first things you learn, as a sushi chef, is how to put in a stint.)Before I give you the details, I should explain, for the benefit of those of you who live in remote wilderness regions such as Iowa, what sushi is. Basically, it is a type of cuisine developed by the Japanese as part of an ancient tradition of seeing what is the scariest thing they can get you to eat raw.The way they do this is, they start out by serving you a nice, nonthreatening piece of fish, from which all the identifying fish parts have been removed.
NEWS
By JILL HUDSON NEAL and JILL HUDSON NEAL,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1999
Ellicott City's MirocJo restaurant might be Howard County's best kept secret.On the second floor of the Bethany 40 Shopping Center, a nondescript office park off U.S. 40 not far from Enchanted Forest Shopping Center, MirocJo will never win any awards for being easy to find.No English signs point you in the direction of the front door, and visitors are likely to mistake any of the surrounding shops and offices for the restaurant -- unless they are fortunate enough to read the many neon signs written in Korean.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1997
It's easy to walk right past Joss Cafe and Sushi Bar, a tiny, 10-table pit stop on Annapolis' Main Street. But once you walk in and the sushi bar chef shouts "Irashai!" ("Welcome" in Japanese), you'll be glad you didn't.My dining companion and I got to the restaurant about 8: 30 p.m., frazzled after a long day at work. Joss Cafe was packed, but its friendly servers and comfy ambience settled our nerves almost immediately.With its soft lighting, partly wood-paneled walls, paper screens and other Japanese artifacts -- including a Kabuki dancer entrance flag -- Joss Cafe makes you feel as if you're dining in a warm, bamboo shack -- a shack lined with the Polaroid photos of customers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
Kyodai bills itself as Baltimore's only rotating sushi bar. The concept is simple, if at first unintentionally amusing: You sit at the bar with your napkin, chopsticks, soy, wasabi and ginger. The sushi-tenders roll up various concoctions, cut them, usually into quarters, plate them, and place them on a shiny silver conveyor belt that chugs along the inside perimeter of the bar. And as they pass, you reach up and pluck down plates that look right for you. No menu. No wondering what it might look like.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 10, 1991
"We've had sushi for years in Baltimore," a joke goes. "We've just called it bait."That joke pretty much summed up my feelings about the chances for success of the Samurai Sushi Bar in the Cross Street Market.I never thought much of sushi. I thought sushi, rather than food, was more a form of amusement for "fashionable" folks. Something that looked pretty, was once "in" in New York, and definitely not for the masses.And so every time I went down to South Baltimore, where real folks and real panhandlers can be found, I expected to see an "out of business" sign on the sushi stand.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 9, 2006
LONDON -- Russian dissident Alexander Litvinenko was likely poisoned at the bar of a hotel here where he met with two other Russians, both of whom are currently in hospitals showing symptoms of radiation sickness, health investigators said yesterday. For weeks, investigators had zeroed in on a different location, the Picadilly Circus sushi restaurant where Litvinenko had lunch, believing that that was a likely location for his mysterious poisoning with radioactive polonium-210. But that theory has been shaken by medical evidence showing that seven people who worked at the bar of the Millennium Hotel in London's Mayfair district have also been exposed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2011
The folks at XS have been stirring. The multistory cafe, sushi bar and lounge has very recently revealed a freshened-up menu, along with a few weekly specials and a handsome new marketing package. That's good to see; I like to see a restaurant trying. XS just passed its seventh anniversary, and although it appears to be doing well — it's always crowded when I walk by — I don't think anyone outside its core base of customers thinks of it much. XS is located on the same strip of Charles Street in Midtown Belvedere as the other members of Jay's Restaurant Group.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
Kyodai bills itself as Baltimore's only rotating sushi bar. The concept is simple, if at first unintentionally amusing: You sit at the bar with your napkin, chopsticks, soy, wasabi and ginger. The sushi-tenders roll up various concoctions, cut them, usually into quarters, plate them, and place them on a shiny silver conveyor belt that chugs along the inside perimeter of the bar. And as they pass, you reach up and pluck down plates that look right for you. No menu. No wondering what it might look like.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2010
Open only since late September, Baltimore Sticky Rice already feels like an established presence on the Fells Point scene. The new place is performing the impressive trick of feeling like a part of the neighborhood while expanding its appeal beyond the cobblestones. So, on an unpredictably crowded Tuesday night, the crowd at Baltimore Sticky Rice is a healthy mix of downtown and uptown folks, most of them young, and all of them having a good time. This is the third Sticky Rice, and it walks the shrewdly designed path laid down by the original in Richmond, Va., which was founded in 1999 by John Yamashita and Jason Henry, and a second Sticky Rice, located in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2010
On a busy night at Sushi Sono , which by many accounts is every night, the wait for a table in the cramped entrance area, even with a reservation, can be an exercise in patience. Formalities and niceties are mostly dispensed with, and the service on a busy night can border on the hectoring. The idea that you could maintain a state of quiet contemplation in Sushi Sono's hectic dining room is laughable. None of this matters. The reason to make the trip to Lake Kittamaqundi, to put up with the confusing signs and alienating ingress into Wincopin Circle, is that Sushi Sono might just have the best sushi in the four-county area.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2010
The client's in town. The client loves sushi. I want the client to love me. I take the client to Joss Cafe. I pick up the tab. Done deal. You can replace "client" with out-of-town guest, superior officer, love interest, fellow foodie, or anyone else you want to impress, Joss promises to appeal because of two strong leading indicators: fine sushi, great space. Just don't go there expecting bargain-basement tabs. When you walk up half a flight of stairs off the sidewalk on 413 N. Charles and enter Joss, you're stepping up in more ways than one. 12:42 p.m. We enter a sparsely attended dining room and are offered our choice of unoccupied tables.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large| elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | January 20, 2010
H ave you noticed how new Little Italy restaurants are less traditional than the old ones? Milan (1000 Eastern Ave.,410-685-6111, OneMilan.com), which opened a couple of weeks ago where Luigi Petti was, advertises itself on the edge of Little Italy and Harbor East, so it's clearly trying to appeal to two separate audiences. The new Italian-slash-Mediterranean restaurant is a far cry from the comfortable, family-owned southern Italian places that used to be the standard for Little Italy.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1998
When Chong Im and Chong Won So moved to Glen Burnie 15 years ago, the Korean-American community there was virtually nonexistent, so they opened Peking Garden restaurant at 7523 Ritchie Highway and served Chinese food.But as more Korean-Americans settled in Glen Burnie, the couple slowly began adding Korean dishes to the menu. About six months ago, the metamorphosis was complete.The Sos added a sushi bar and new tables with built-in hot plates for Korean-style barbecue, introduced a new menu with Korean, Japanese and Chinese fare, and changed the restaurant's name to Blue Garden.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | July 26, 1991
John Steven Ltd. is like many other Fells Point bars in some ways. True to its neighborhood, the bar itself is a massive affair that must have kept a wood carver busy for weeks. Overhead, the pressed tin ceiling and gently whirring fans are also remiJohn Steven Ltd. is like many other Fells Point bars in some ways. True to its neighborhood, the bar itself is a massive affair that must have kept a wood carver busy for weeks. Overhead, the pressed tin ceiling and gently whirring fans are also reminders of just how old this waterfront community is. Add in the requisite antique and just plain odd bric-a-brac covering the walls and you immediately get that funky Fells Point feeling.
FEATURES
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2009
Geisha is one of the few restaurants I can think of that looks better during the daytime than at night. Geisha's dining rooms are below ground level, down a flight of stairs from its entrance on Charles Street, and at night you can feel a little sad in them, as though you've been confined to the basement while adults are having a party upstairs. By day, though, the room's rusts, cherries and ambers resolve themselves handsomely along clean midcentury lines, and the ambience feels more intentional, like an executive dining room.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.