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Susan Sontag

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 5, 2000
Susan Sontag is one of the most interesting minds in America. I first became aware of her by reading her still often-anthologized essay, "Notes on Camp," published in 1964 in Partisan Review. It created a stir among my chattier friends, who recommended it. It brilliantly made clear the concept of the then-burgeoning mockery of seriousness. (Think pink flamingos.) The analytic discipline and the precision of expression in that piece launched the term "camp" into the common vocabulary. It began to convince me that Sontag was one of those rare talents who combine the creative insight of the artist and the comprehensive perspective of the scholar at their best.
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NEWS
December 29, 2004
HER RECOLLECTION of lying in bed as a youngster, looking at the volumes in her bookcase, wasn't particularly original or unconventional or provocative. "A book was like stepping through a mirror," Susan Sontag once said. "I could go somewhere else. Each one was a door to a whole new kingdom." But each door she opened, every literary, philosophical, cultural and social landscape she explored, sharpened her thinking and writing, which in turn opened innumerable doors for those daring to venture out. Her looking glass often conveyed an image of the world that challenged conventional thinking.
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NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | August 16, 1992
THE VOLCANO LOVER: A ROMANCE.Susan Sontag.Farrar, Straus & Giroux.415 pages. $22. It will doubtless come as a surprise to her readers that Susan Sontag, intellectual par excellence, whose fiction and essays are modernist and theoretical, has subtitled her first novel in 20 years "a romance." The designation is ironic, for the novel, a retelling of the famous love triangle between Sir William Hamilton; his wife, Emma (Lady Hamilton), and her lover, Horatio (Lord Nelson), is in fact more of an anti-romance than a romance.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | December 29, 2004
Susan Sontag was perhaps the most prominent example of an increasingly endangered species in modern American life - the public intellectual. The outspoken philosopher, novelist, playwright, film director and essayist - winner of the 2000 National Book Award - died yesterday of leukemia at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. She was 71. "What a privilege it was to be alive when she was writing," said Craig Seligman, the New York-based author of Sontag and Kael. "Susan Sontag could make her readers madder than just about any other writer except for [the late film critic]
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2000
Maryland poet Lucille Clifton is among 20 finalists for the National Book Awards, it was announced yesterday. "I just found out yesterday," Clifton said from her home in Columbia. "It is an honor. It's one of the most prestigious literary awards in the country." Clifton was nominated for her book, "Blessing the Boats: New and Selected Poems 1988-2000" (BOA Editions, Ltd.) "It's my 30th or 31st book, which includes 10 books of poetry," she said. The book by the former poet laureate of Maryland was among 835 titles considered for awards by the National Book Foundation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren Weiner and Lauren Weiner,Special to the Sun | July 9, 2000
"Susan Sontag: The Making of an Icon" by Carl Rollyson and Lisa Paddock. W.W. Norton and Company. 370 pages. $29.95. The woman that Carl Rollyson and Lisa Paddock depict in their biography "Susan Sontag: The Making of an Icon" became a household name by arguing, rebelling, playing the contrarian -- often toward her own previously expressed views and ideas. Her first revolt -- the one that brought her early fame -- was against the Freudianism that pervaded the world of the intellect in the 1950s and 1960s.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | December 29, 2004
Susan Sontag was perhaps the most prominent example of an increasingly endangered species in modern American life - the public intellectual. The outspoken philosopher, novelist, playwright, film director and essayist - winner of the 2000 National Book Award - died yesterday of leukemia at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. She was 71. "What a privilege it was to be alive when she was writing," said Craig Seligman, the New York-based author of Sontag and Kael. "Susan Sontag could make her readers madder than just about any other writer except for [the late film critic]
NEWS
December 29, 2004
HER RECOLLECTION of lying in bed as a youngster, looking at the volumes in her bookcase, wasn't particularly original or unconventional or provocative. "A book was like stepping through a mirror," Susan Sontag once said. "I could go somewhere else. Each one was a door to a whole new kingdom." But each door she opened, every literary, philosophical, cultural and social landscape she explored, sharpened her thinking and writing, which in turn opened innumerable doors for those daring to venture out. Her looking glass often conveyed an image of the world that challenged conventional thinking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 17, 2000
'Tis the season to be jolly, just as surely as the Magis follow the Eastern Star, bearing stuff. I am not an enthusiast for obligatory gift lists in newspapers and magazines. As to books, I believe that a gentle trot through a good book shop will do you more good than the endless inventories recommended by editors. A nasty little secret of publishing is that many -- maybe most -- of those lists are generated by a Macedonian phalanx of public relations people, and the consequence is that legions of blameless citizens get as gifts books that never have their covers cracked.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | August 24, 1992
New York -- It was Crash Davis, the hard-nosed minor league catcher with a literary bent and esoteric air, who gave in the movie "Bull Durham" one of the great declarations of personal philosophy: "I believe in the hangin' curveball, the high-fiver, good scotch, that the novels of Susan Sontag are self-indulgent, overrated crap. I believe that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone and that there should be a constitutional amendment banning artificial turf and the designated hitter."As platforms go, it might not be enough to get elected, but it was enough to get Crash, as played by Kevin Costner, a place in the heart -- and bed -- of the college professor baseball groupie (Susan Sarandon)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 17, 2000
'Tis the season to be jolly, just as surely as the Magis follow the Eastern Star, bearing stuff. I am not an enthusiast for obligatory gift lists in newspapers and magazines. As to books, I believe that a gentle trot through a good book shop will do you more good than the endless inventories recommended by editors. A nasty little secret of publishing is that many -- maybe most -- of those lists are generated by a Macedonian phalanx of public relations people, and the consequence is that legions of blameless citizens get as gifts books that never have their covers cracked.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2000
Maryland poet Lucille Clifton is among 20 finalists for the National Book Awards, it was announced yesterday. "I just found out yesterday," Clifton said from her home in Columbia. "It is an honor. It's one of the most prestigious literary awards in the country." Clifton was nominated for her book, "Blessing the Boats: New and Selected Poems 1988-2000" (BOA Editions, Ltd.) "It's my 30th or 31st book, which includes 10 books of poetry," she said. The book by the former poet laureate of Maryland was among 835 titles considered for awards by the National Book Foundation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren Weiner and Lauren Weiner,Special to the Sun | July 9, 2000
"Susan Sontag: The Making of an Icon" by Carl Rollyson and Lisa Paddock. W.W. Norton and Company. 370 pages. $29.95. The woman that Carl Rollyson and Lisa Paddock depict in their biography "Susan Sontag: The Making of an Icon" became a household name by arguing, rebelling, playing the contrarian -- often toward her own previously expressed views and ideas. Her first revolt -- the one that brought her early fame -- was against the Freudianism that pervaded the world of the intellect in the 1950s and 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 5, 2000
Susan Sontag is one of the most interesting minds in America. I first became aware of her by reading her still often-anthologized essay, "Notes on Camp," published in 1964 in Partisan Review. It created a stir among my chattier friends, who recommended it. It brilliantly made clear the concept of the then-burgeoning mockery of seriousness. (Think pink flamingos.) The analytic discipline and the precision of expression in that piece launched the term "camp" into the common vocabulary. It began to convince me that Sontag was one of those rare talents who combine the creative insight of the artist and the comprehensive perspective of the scholar at their best.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | August 24, 1992
New York -- It was Crash Davis, the hard-nosed minor league catcher with a literary bent and esoteric air, who gave in the movie "Bull Durham" one of the great declarations of personal philosophy: "I believe in the hangin' curveball, the high-fiver, good scotch, that the novels of Susan Sontag are self-indulgent, overrated crap. I believe that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone and that there should be a constitutional amendment banning artificial turf and the designated hitter."As platforms go, it might not be enough to get elected, but it was enough to get Crash, as played by Kevin Costner, a place in the heart -- and bed -- of the college professor baseball groupie (Susan Sarandon)
NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | August 16, 1992
THE VOLCANO LOVER: A ROMANCE.Susan Sontag.Farrar, Straus & Giroux.415 pages. $22. It will doubtless come as a surprise to her readers that Susan Sontag, intellectual par excellence, whose fiction and essays are modernist and theoretical, has subtitled her first novel in 20 years "a romance." The designation is ironic, for the novel, a retelling of the famous love triangle between Sir William Hamilton; his wife, Emma (Lady Hamilton), and her lover, Horatio (Lord Nelson), is in fact more of an anti-romance than a romance.
NEWS
May 29, 2004
Roger W. Straus Jr., 87, a Guggenheim heir who co-founded one of the great publishing houses of the 20th century, died Tuesday of pneumonia at Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan, according to his son, Roger Straus III. The longtime head of Farrar, Straus & Giroux, he was among the last of the true old-fashioned publishers. He ran his own company for more than half a century, holding on even as the book world evolved from a small, clannish community to an increasingly impersonal, money-minded business.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,sun art critic | October 14, 2007
At 58, celebrity portrait photographer Annie Leibovitz seems to have made peace with the choices that led her to a fantastically successful, 35-year career. Though her photos hang in art museums - an exhibition of her work opened this weekend at the Corcoran Gallery of Art - she doesn't seem particularly insistent on claiming everything she does is great art. In Washington last week to promote her show Annie Leibovitz: A Photographer's Life, 1990-2005, she fielded more criticism that the concept - mixing slick images of Demi Moore, Brad Pitt, Queen Elizabeth II, etc. with personal snapshots of family and friends - seemed self-indulgent.
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