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By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
Supporters of Maryland's new same-sex marriage law look to the Empire State for cash this evening at a fundraiser hosted by a bevy of boldfaced names. Susan Sarandon, Josh Charles, John Waters and ice hockey player Sean Avery are among the stars expected to mingle with supporters who are paying between $250 and $25,000 to be at the Manhattan event. Gov. Martin O'Malley is also planning to be there as a "special guest. " Opponents to the new law have taken notice. Derek McCoy, the executive director of Maryland Marriage Alliance, wrote in a fundraising e-mail sent out yesterday: "We know that in spite of the millions that they will receive from movie stars, Marylanders will not allow marriage to be redefined.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
Supporters of Maryland's new same-sex marriage law look to the Empire State for cash this evening at a fundraiser hosted by a bevy of boldfaced names. Susan Sarandon, Josh Charles, John Waters and ice hockey player Sean Avery are among the stars expected to mingle with supporters who are paying between $250 and $25,000 to be at the Manhattan event. Gov. Martin O'Malley is also planning to be there as a "special guest. " Opponents to the new law have taken notice. Derek McCoy, the executive director of Maryland Marriage Alliance, wrote in a fundraising e-mail sent out yesterday: "We know that in spite of the millions that they will receive from movie stars, Marylanders will not allow marriage to be redefined.
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FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | June 19, 1991
Susan Sarandon continues to speak her mind. She is 44 now, but time has not made her any less verbal. She is our own Vanessa Redgrave. Politically, she is not so visible as Redgrave, but in her own way she is outspoken and undaunted by controversy.She recently attracted attention when she made comments about the war against Iraq. She did not approve and let it be known.She still does not approve and continues to say so. ''The United States has been raping non-white countries, and we've gotten a bad name for it,'' she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
"Ping Pong Summer," an indie film starring Susan Sarandon, Amy Sedaris and John Hannah, is set to start filming for six weeks in Ocean City next month, the state announced today. The Maryland Film Office estimates that producers will hire 90 local crew, actors and extras, as well as purchasing and renting goods and services from 140 Maryland businesses. The economic impact: $2 million, according to estimates by the state. The film is written and will be directed by Maryland native Mike Tully.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 12, 1999
It's possible to see a torch being passed in "Anywhere But Here," a small coming-of-age drama in which Natalie Portman, the shy, lissome center of the movie, effectively steals the show from Susan Sarandon. Portman is too good an actress to make a show of this; her power lies in her ability to draw attention by doing what looks like nothing at all. And Sarandon is generous enough to cede her ground graciously."Anywhere But Here" is a pretty good movie, but it's a great example of class in action.
NEWS
By Sandy Coleman and Sandy Coleman,BOSTON GLOBE | March 17, 1996
In case we hadn't noticed, Glamour points out this month that Hollywood's "most desirable women are over 35 and acting their age."The hot celluloid ladies include Ellen Barkin, 40; Meryl Streep, 46; Susan Sarandon, 49; and Michelle Pfeiffer, 38.That's great news for all of us who aren't getting any younger. However, the fact still remains that those actresses will never be paired with a sweet young thang the way older male actors are. Robert Redford, 58, can offer 33-year-old Demi Moore an indecent proposal, but when will we see Meryl Streep get busy with, say, 34-year-old Michael J. Fox?
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 26, 1996
Mel Gibson's "Braveheart" proved the heartiest, if not the bravest, movie of the year as it won four Oscars at last night's 68th Annual Acadmey Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director for Gibson. The film, a reaffirmation of "old movie values" in a period when movies have come under more and more criticism, told the story of Scottish patriot William Wallace who, in the 13th century, led an army against the English oppressors, won several battles but ultimately was captured and executed.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY | September 19, 2008
My favorite of all time is Annie Savoy, Susan Sarandon's groupie literature professor in Bull Durham. She's sexy, smart, knows literature and baseball, and even references the Frank Robinson-Milt Pappas trade. I mean, come on. Groupie or not, that's a perfect woman. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/cornersportsbar)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 9, 2008
The Wachowski Brothers, the same overgrown boy wonders who concocted The Matrix, create a psychedelic candy store in Speed Racer, then get caught in it with their eyes popped, their brains blown and their pants down. It's a family film done as a trip film. It is a trip, but it's a bad trip. This new version of the Japanese cartoon series about a child auto-racing champ named, with charming obviousness, "Speed Racer," is live-actor, but not exactly live-action. The Wachowskis cast Emile Hirsch as Speed Racer, Susan Sarandon as Mom Racer and John Goodman as Pops Racer, then filmed them against a green screen, adding layer after layer of computer-generated imagery to create intricate props and sets and dizzying deep-focus panoramas.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | September 14, 2007
From the character-building brutality of middle school gym class to the towers of psychobabble topping the best-seller list, Mr. Woodcock plants some succulent comedy in its antagonists and then lets the juice drain away. Mr. Woodcock (Billy Bob Thornton) is the Captain Bligh of calisthenics, basketball and wrestling, and John Farley (Seann William Scott) is a former flabby student who has trimmed down in adulthood and written a self-help book, Letting Go. What brings them together 13 years after Farley leaves his class is Woodcock's courtship of Farley's captivating mom, Beverly (Susan Sarandon)
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY | September 19, 2008
My favorite of all time is Annie Savoy, Susan Sarandon's groupie literature professor in Bull Durham. She's sexy, smart, knows literature and baseball, and even references the Frank Robinson-Milt Pappas trade. I mean, come on. Groupie or not, that's a perfect woman. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/cornersportsbar)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 9, 2008
The Wachowski Brothers, the same overgrown boy wonders who concocted The Matrix, create a psychedelic candy store in Speed Racer, then get caught in it with their eyes popped, their brains blown and their pants down. It's a family film done as a trip film. It is a trip, but it's a bad trip. This new version of the Japanese cartoon series about a child auto-racing champ named, with charming obviousness, "Speed Racer," is live-actor, but not exactly live-action. The Wachowskis cast Emile Hirsch as Speed Racer, Susan Sarandon as Mom Racer and John Goodman as Pops Racer, then filmed them against a green screen, adding layer after layer of computer-generated imagery to create intricate props and sets and dizzying deep-focus panoramas.
FEATURES
December 21, 2007
Taking a page from Pennies From Heaven, the family and neighbors of Romance & Cigarettes' Nick Murder (James Gandolfini) act out by singing along to kitschy hits, such as Engelbert Humperdinck's "A Man Without Love." It's karaoke with a vengeance as Murder, a Queens, N.Y., construction worker, takes refuge from a dead marriage in the arms of an underwear shop clerk (Kate Winslet, ferreting humanity out of a crass other-woman stereotype). His wife (Susan Sarandon) and his daughters (Mary-Louise Parker, Mandy Moore, Aida Turturro)
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | September 24, 2007
Marlo Thomas stopped in at L.A.'s trendy Frida Mexican and immediately caught the eye of one of this column's handy helpers. Our guy complimented the new sparkling DVD release of Marlo's iconic That Girl sitcom. Mrs. Phil Donahue - of whom he said, "doesn't she ever age?" - was gracious and forthcoming: "I am thrilled about the shows being out. I did an audio commentary. And I have to credit the whole team - the cast and writers - for making the series so successful. Ann Marie was the first single girl on TV to have her own pad and a boyfriend.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | September 14, 2007
From the character-building brutality of middle school gym class to the towers of psychobabble topping the best-seller list, Mr. Woodcock plants some succulent comedy in its antagonists and then lets the juice drain away. Mr. Woodcock (Billy Bob Thornton) is the Captain Bligh of calisthenics, basketball and wrestling, and John Farley (Seann William Scott) is a former flabby student who has trimmed down in adulthood and written a self-help book, Letting Go. What brings them together 13 years after Farley leaves his class is Woodcock's courtship of Farley's captivating mom, Beverly (Susan Sarandon)
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 16, 2006
In the future, let's hope we can leave the word "trick" out of love stories or sex comedies unless it refers to a prostitute's client. The Lake House, in which a mailbox serves as a time portal for two lovers (Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock) is the latest in a series of gimmick-ridden romances. The increasing absurdity of the trick dashes any genuine emotion as the movie goes on. At the screening I went to, the gentleman in front of me turned around to me and my friends and asked whether we'd noticed that the film ended in a way that made its opening action, even on its own terms, impossible.
FEATURES
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,ORLANDO SENTINEL | October 15, 2004
John Clark ought to be a happy man. He has a successful law practice in Chicago. He's married to a beautiful woman who loves him. And they have two terrific kids. But - as we learn in Shall We Dance? - the spark has gone out of his life. If you're thinking midlife crisis, that doesn't quite do it. John (Richard Gere) isn't in crisis so much as he's in stasis. Let's call it a midlife rut. Shall We Dance? - the brassy new Hollywood remake of the delicate 1996 Japanese film - is about how this man rediscovers the romance within himself by enrolling in a ballroom-dancing class.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2000
It's practically a requirement of any film with the word "Paris" in its title to have the Eiffel Tower figure prominently in at least one scene. So when the landmark appears in Nickelodeon's latest cartoon film, "Rugrats in Paris: The Movie," it's natural to expect a cliched, ooh-look-they're-in-France scene. Instead, the Rugrats movie gives a chuckle-worthy nod to two classics when a large, robot dinosaur climbs up the Tower a la "King Kong." And when the babies operating the monster look up and spot an annoying fellow Rugrat hurtling through the sky, they squeal, "It's a nerd!
FEATURES
By Sid Smith and Sid Smith,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 27, 2005
The Exonerated, a made-for-TV movie (9 tonight, Court TV) based on the off-Broadway play, tells the stories behind the headlines about flaws in our criminal justice system. Here are six heartfelt, in-depth autobiographies, conveyed by actors but based on interviews and true stories, telling of individuals falsely convicted, sentenced to death and freed many years later. The outlines of their stories are shocking enough, but Exonerated explores their intimate experiences and conveys the incalculable and irreversible human cost such injustice exacts.
FEATURES
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,ORLANDO SENTINEL | October 15, 2004
John Clark ought to be a happy man. He has a successful law practice in Chicago. He's married to a beautiful woman who loves him. And they have two terrific kids. But - as we learn in Shall We Dance? - the spark has gone out of his life. If you're thinking midlife crisis, that doesn't quite do it. John (Richard Gere) isn't in crisis so much as he's in stasis. Let's call it a midlife rut. Shall We Dance? - the brassy new Hollywood remake of the delicate 1996 Japanese film - is about how this man rediscovers the romance within himself by enrolling in a ballroom-dancing class.
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