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September 6, 1998
Write each of these compound words found in the story "Mirette on the High Wire" on an index card. Cut a wavy line between the two small words that make up each compound word. For example: her self. Then mix up the individual words and ask your child to put the word puzzles together to form the 10 original compound words. Some words may match with more than one ending (e.g., something or someone), but the pieces will fit exactly with the original words. Let your child find and circle the compound words in the story.
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NEWS
December 23, 2001
This year at Christmastime, people all over the world are united in spirit. It's also an opportune time for learning about the unique ways people in other countries celebrate Christmas. In GERMANY on the eve of Dec. 6, children place a shoe or boot by the fireplace. During the night, St. Nicholas goes from house to house carrying a "book of sins" in which all of the misdeeds of the children are written. If they have been good, he fills their shoe with delicious holiday edibles. If they haven't been good, their shoe is filled with twigs!
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FEATURES
December 13, 1998
Sometimes all that's required to enjoy a good book is a little imagination! After reading "Going Home," invite your child to retell the events of the story in order in her own way. She may choose to act it out, write a poem, make a collage of magazine cutouts or draw a series of pictures. Help out if your child gets confused about the characters or the sequence of the events. If your child makes a collage or drawings, ask her to tell you about the story. Help your child learn to use terms such as "What happened first?"
NEWS
September 30, 2001
As Dyslexia Awareness Week winds down today, don't let the opportunity to learn about it slip away. Though some may think dyslexia is synonymous with difficulty in learning how to read, it is generally defined as a language-based learning disability (affecting 15 to 17 percent of the population). Dyslexia can make it very difficult for a student to succeed academically - but that doesn't mean that success in other matters is elusive. "Many disabilities that produce failure in traditional schools might be seen as abilities in life's rough waters," explains Sally Smith in her book Succeeding Against the Odds.
FEATURES
April 29, 1998
To encourage the sort of rhyming found in poetry, try this game.Write each of these words on an index card (or come up with your own list): say, play, may, stay. Tell, shell, fell, spell. Thing, ring, bring, sing. Men, pen, ten, wren.Mix up the cards and place them on a table in four rows of four cards. Take turns playing concentration by turning over one card and trying to match it with a rhyming word. If it's a match, that player gets to go again. If it's not a match, replace the card in the same spot and move on to the next person's turn.
FEATURES
June 24, 1998
Asking questions after reading to your child is a wonderful way to help him or her think about the story and develop comprehension skills. Ask a few, but not too many questions, and remember to have fun. Here are some suggestions for the Anansi story:* Which part of the story did you like best? (Or least?)* Which part was the funniest? (Silliest? Saddest?)* What words did you like best?* Why do you think Anansi acted the way he did?* How would you have changed the story's ending?* What would have happened if Little Bush Deer had not seen Anansi and decided to teach him a lesson?
FEATURES
April 15, 1998
After reading the story "Stone Soup," discuss how the soldiers were able to make soup from stones. Then have the child name some of the food that the peasants in the town were able to find:saltcabbagepotatoesciderpepperbeefbarleyroastcarrotsbreadmilkwaterThen ask the child these questions:Which are meats? (roast, beef)Which are vegetables? (potatoes, carrots, cabbage)Which one is a grain? (barley)Which are liquids? (milk, cider)You can extend this activity by making a vegetable or vegetablbeef soup with your child.
FEATURES
August 2, 1998
The ultimate goal for listening and reading is comprehension. By setting a purpose for listening to or reading literature, you will be helping your child to derive meaning and satisfaction from print.Help your child organize his or her thoughts after reading the story "The Fabulous Flying Fandinis." First, draw an organizer chart like the one pictured here. Invite your child to listen as you read the story aloud. Then, have your child recall the ideas to tell the story again, but change the ending or change the problem.
NEWS
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | May 23, 1999
Teach your child about syllables by first clapping or tapping as you say the words. After reading the story "Eloise," ask, "How many sounds do you hear in the name El-o-ise?" (three) Then, say your child's name and ask her to clap the number of sounds she hears. Next, try clapping the sounds to some one (bat, school, book), two (pen-cil, base-ball, air-plane), three (vi-o-lin, pine-ap-ple, ra-di-o), four (tel-e-vis-ion, en-ter-tain-ment, el-e-va-tor) or more syllables (hip-po-pot-a-mus, en-cy-clo-ped-i-a)
FEATURES
June 3, 1998
After reading "The Story About Ping," look at the pictures of the ducks. Count aloud together: first, second, third, fourth, fifth. Ask, "Which duck is last?"Discuss what it means to be last. When is it bad to be last? For example: waiting in line to get ice cream; the last one into class. Are there times when it might be good to be last?See if your child can recognize and read the numbers mentioned in the story1 2 3 11 7 42Ask if she remembers, "How many sisters did Ping have?" (two)How many brothers?
NEWS
July 22, 2001
Editor's Note: Susan Rapp presents the first of several articles that will help families navigate the Internet. Today she discusses how to incorporate this technology into developing reading skills. The Worldwide Web offers parents, caregivers and children innumerable ways to broaden their knowledge and enrich their lives. A wealth of sites allows children to read books, communicate with their favorite authors and even publish their own stories. But, even if you use the Internet all the time, it is hard to know where to begin.
NEWS
May 14, 2000
Advice and strategies to help your children read Long ago in England, people honored their mothers on a special day called "Mothering Day." Carnations adorned the celebration. On the other side of the Atlantic, Anna Jarvis makes Mother's Day an American tradition starting in 1907. President Wilson then proclaimed Mother's Day an official holiday observed the second Sunday in May. This day provides the perfect opportunity for children to demonstrate the warmth and support they receive from their mothers all year long by creating a meaningful, homemade gift from the heart.
NEWS
April 30, 2000
Advice and strategies to help your children read Camps make learning fun Summer camp is often perceived as a vacation from school, but it can also be a place for kids to pick up valuable academic skills. Locally, there are camps to meet every interest, price and schedule. Youngsters can refresh their reading fundamentals -- phonics, comprehension, writing or spelling -- or focus on using reading in everyday applications, such as news stories. Programs such as "College for Kids" at Towson University or "Kids on Campus" at Howard Community College bring the younger crowd onto the big turf with enticing courses.
NEWS
August 22, 1999
Young children begin each school year full of wonder and eager to learn. They have a natural curiosity and an unending supply of questions. "Do fish fly?" "Why is the ocean blue?" In the past, questions like these may have been given a cursory response or even dismissed in the rush of the busy school day. With today's technology, however, teachers can direct students to sources that will quickly expand their knowledge and feed their appetite to learn.Search toolsThese web guides are uncomplicated, have easy-to-follow directions and search within a limited range of appropriate sites:* www.yahooligans.
NEWS
June 6, 1999
After reading "Because You're Lucky," write each of these sight words on a 3-by-5 index card. Place five words at a time in front of your child. Give clues to describe the new word, then ask your child to say the word and use it in a sentence. For example, using the first row of five cards say, "Can you be a good detective and find a new word that means battle?" Your child should pick up the card with the word "fight" and use it in a sentence. As a variation, place four of the sight words in a row in front of your child.
NEWS
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | May 23, 1999
Teach your child about syllables by first clapping or tapping as you say the words. After reading the story "Eloise," ask, "How many sounds do you hear in the name El-o-ise?" (three) Then, say your child's name and ask her to clap the number of sounds she hears. Next, try clapping the sounds to some one (bat, school, book), two (pen-cil, base-ball, air-plane), three (vi-o-lin, pine-ap-ple, ra-di-o), four (tel-e-vis-ion, en-ter-tain-ment, el-e-va-tor) or more syllables (hip-po-pot-a-mus, en-cy-clo-ped-i-a)
FEATURES
May 27, 1998
Use a shopping catalog such as J.C. Penny or Sears. Tell your child you are going on a shopping trip. Have him select an item, such as a television, and ask him, "What sound does television begin with?"You can do the same with other items, and every time he gives the correct sound, he gets to cut out and keep that object. When he does not know a sound, tell him, "Television begins with the sound 't'." Try not to say a vowel after the sound, in other words say 't' not 'tuh.' Praise him for the sounds he does give correctly.
NEWS
By Susan Rapp | January 31, 1999
Editor's note: Today, reading specialist Susan Rapp discusses the benefits of electronic toys and provides guidelines for selecting them. On Wednesday's Parent & Child page, she will review specific toys appropriate for emerging readers.Somewhere between the phonics workbooks and the high-tech CD-ROM games are new products that can motivate and entertain while providing serious learning of reading skills. These include electronic toys, which are more portable than personal computer games and more interesting than paper and pencil tasks.
NEWS
April 25, 1999
"Starting Out Right: A Guide to Promoting Children's Reading Success," editors: M. Susan Burns, Peg Griffin and Catherine E. Snow, $14.95. Available at bookstores or by calling National Academy Press at 800-624-6242. You can read the book online at the Web site www.nap.edu.Much has been written about establishing the best ways to teach children how to read. "Starting Out Right" clearly explains the latest research findings and provides suggestions for parents, caregivers and teachers. Based on a major report of the National Research Council, "Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children," this book offers practical guidelines, program descriptions, advice on resources and strategies that can be used in everyday life.
NEWS
February 28, 1999
ACTIVITYChildren enjoy the playful language contained in rhymes. Rhyming introduces children to the sounds of words and improves their sensitivity to the phonemes that make up our language. Through rhymes children learn that language not only has meaning, but it also has form. A Web source that allows children to complete rhymes and to submit some of their own is www.abctooncenter.com/rhymes.htm.Did You Ever See?:Silliness is the name of the game with this fun activity. Read a variety of funny rhymes and poems by Dr. Seuss, Shel Silverstein or Jack Prelutsky.
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