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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Moments after President Clinton gave videotaped testimony for the criminal trial of James and Susan McDougal, his former Whitewater partners, he privately agreed to give Susan McDougal a pardon if she was convicted, a new book by James McDougal says."
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | March 26, 1999
Take that, you brute, Saddam . . . uh, Slobodan. Keeping track of the enemy can be so confusing.This does not hurt us more than it hurts them. It hurts them more.Starr is the one who ought to be on trial, if you want to believe Susan McDougal. Or even if you don't.If the traveling public cannot trust a Boeing 737, what's left?Pub Date: 3/26/99
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NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Lyle Denniston contributed to this article | March 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- James B. McDougal, a former Clinton business partner who had been cooperating with independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr in the Whitewater investigation, died yesterday in a federal prison hospital in Texas. He was 58.McDougal was serving a 3 1/2 -year sentence after Starr's office successfully prosecuted him on fraud charges stemming from the collapse of Madison Guaranty Savings & Loan, a McDougal-owned Arkansas thrift that cost taxpayers $60 million when it failed.His death appears to reduce the legal risks to President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton, and was a clear setback to Starr and his prosecutors, who huddled in their offices last night after McDougal's death was announced.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Moments after President Clinton gave videotaped testimony for the criminal trial of James and Susan McDougal, his former Whitewater partners, he privately agreed to give Susan McDougal a pardon if she was convicted, a new book by James McDougal says."
NEWS
By Dan Berger | March 26, 1999
Take that, you brute, Saddam . . . uh, Slobodan. Keeping track of the enemy can be so confusing.This does not hurt us more than it hurts them. It hurts them more.Starr is the one who ought to be on trial, if you want to believe Susan McDougal. Or even if you don't.If the traveling public cannot trust a Boeing 737, what's left?Pub Date: 3/26/99
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton strongly implied yesterday that he believes special prosecutor Kenneth W. Starr is out to get him -- even to the point of soliciting perjured testimony.The president's remarks came about halfway through a 30-minute PBS interview -- taped yesterday and aired last night -- with newscaster Jim Lehrer.In the interview, Lehrer asked the president about possible problems in the final weeks of the campaign, including the continuing Whitewater investigation. As part of that investigation Starr prosecuted -- and obtained convictions against -- James and Susan McDougal, business partners of Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton in the early 1980s.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 17, 1994
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Special counsel Robert Fiske Jr. persuaded a federal judge yesterday to convene a separate grand jury to investigate the allegations surrounding President Clinton's investment in the Whitewater Development Corp.After a 40-minute meeting with Mr. Fiske, U.S. District Judge Stephen Reasoner ruled that a new grand jury should be impaneled to work exclusively on the Whitewater case because the one now sitting in Little Rock is not prepared to continue long enough to hear the evidence in the case.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- "To your knowledge," the prosecutor asked Susan McDougal last summer, "did William Jefferson Clinton testify truthfully at your trial?"The witness, seated before a grand jury in Little Rock, was silent -- as she had been when asked everything but her name. Knowing her silence would result in a contempt-of-court order, she said, "I'm ready to go to jail."That is where McDougal, 41, has been for eight months -- most of that time in solitary confinement in a 5- by-9-foot cell -- surviving on cold meals and defiance.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 29, 1996
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, testifying under oath yesterday in a criminal trial stemming from the Whitewater scandal, denied -- as he has previously in interviews with the news media -- allegations linking him to an alleged conspiracy to defraud two federally backed lending institutions.The president, whose videotaped testimony will be played at a later date in the U.S. District Court case in Little Rock, Ark., was questioned for nearly 4 1/2 hours by defense and prosecution attorneys behind closed doors at the White House.
NEWS
By James M. Kramon | September 22, 1996
IMAGINE YOU'RE James McDougal and you've been convicted on 18 fraud and conspiracy counts that could result in a maximum 84-year prison term and a $4.5 million fine. Would you cooperate with prosecutors in return for the promise of a more lenient sentence?Well, McDougal weighed the possibilities and decided to cooperate with Kenneth W. Starr, the independent counsel who is investigating Whitewater. Starr is seeking evidence of possible criminal conduct by the president and his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | May 8, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Independent prosecutor Kenneth Starr has never been more transparently political than in his clumsy attempt to force President Clinton to share responsibility for the new charges facing Susan McDougal.The notion that the president could have been expected to urge any witness in the Whitewater case to testify is ludicrous. If Mr. Clinton wandered into that thicket, he would face a hundred questions about, for example, why he didn't apply similar pressure to Webster Hubbell or anyone else involved in the case.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Lyle Denniston contributed to this article | March 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- James B. McDougal, a former Clinton business partner who had been cooperating with independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr in the Whitewater investigation, died yesterday in a federal prison hospital in Texas. He was 58.McDougal was serving a 3 1/2 -year sentence after Starr's office successfully prosecuted him on fraud charges stemming from the collapse of Madison Guaranty Savings & Loan, a McDougal-owned Arkansas thrift that cost taxpayers $60 million when it failed.His death appears to reduce the legal risks to President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton, and was a clear setback to Starr and his prosecutors, who huddled in their offices last night after McDougal's death was announced.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- "To your knowledge," the prosecutor asked Susan McDougal last summer, "did William Jefferson Clinton testify truthfully at your trial?"The witness, seated before a grand jury in Little Rock, was silent -- as she had been when asked everything but her name. Knowing her silence would result in a contempt-of-court order, she said, "I'm ready to go to jail."That is where McDougal, 41, has been for eight months -- most of that time in solitary confinement in a 5- by-9-foot cell -- surviving on cold meals and defiance.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | September 26, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Let's use some imagination. Suppose that George Bush were still president. Suppose further that his former business partner of 14 years, found guilty of four felonies including fraud, has been sentenced to jail for contempt of court. The reason? Refusing to cooperate with a grand-jury investigation into the activities of the president.Would this not be front-page news, day after day? Would the jailed friend of the president not be featured on every network news broadcast regularly?
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton strongly implied yesterday that he believes special prosecutor Kenneth W. Starr is out to get him -- even to the point of soliciting perjured testimony.The president's remarks came about halfway through a 30-minute PBS interview -- taped yesterday and aired last night -- with newscaster Jim Lehrer.In the interview, Lehrer asked the president about possible problems in the final weeks of the campaign, including the continuing Whitewater investigation. As part of that investigation Starr prosecuted -- and obtained convictions against -- James and Susan McDougal, business partners of Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton in the early 1980s.
NEWS
By James M. Kramon | September 22, 1996
IMAGINE YOU'RE James McDougal and you've been convicted on 18 fraud and conspiracy counts that could result in a maximum 84-year prison term and a $4.5 million fine. Would you cooperate with prosecutors in return for the promise of a more lenient sentence?Well, McDougal weighed the possibilities and decided to cooperate with Kenneth W. Starr, the independent counsel who is investigating Whitewater. Starr is seeking evidence of possible criminal conduct by the president and his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
By Susan Baer | May 30, 1996
The guilty verdicts this week in the first Whitewater trial are of great interest to the special prosecutor, to President Clinton and to the president's Republican foes.For the prosecutor, the verdicts could accelerate other parts of his investigation. For Republicans, they are ammunition in an election year. For the White House, there is only the modest comfort that the president himself had little to do with the case just concluded.Susan Baer of The Sun's national staff takes a look at what the trial means to the Whitewater saga -- and what it doesn't.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | May 8, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Independent prosecutor Kenneth Starr has never been more transparently political than in his clumsy attempt to force President Clinton to share responsibility for the new charges facing Susan McDougal.The notion that the president could have been expected to urge any witness in the Whitewater case to testify is ludicrous. If Mr. Clinton wandered into that thicket, he would face a hundred questions about, for example, why he didn't apply similar pressure to Webster Hubbell or anyone else involved in the case.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 1996
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- For two decades, Jim Guy Tucker, a gifted, young Arkansas politician, has moved in the ever-lengthening shadow of his more illustrious contemporary, Bill Clinton. Over the years, the rivalry between the two Democrats gradually turned to bitter resentment.Thus it is a brutal twist that Tucker, who was convicted of fraud and conspiracy last week in the first Whitewater-related trial, is resigning as governor as a direct result of a criminal investigation Clinton.As Tucker sees it, according to his friends, he would never have been tried for these crimes if his nemesis had not been elected to the White House.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 30, 1996
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton and his aides put on a brave public face yesterday in the wake of the guilty verdicts in the first Whitewater trial. But at the White House, the realization had sunk in that Whitewater is likely to remain an issue throughout the 1996 presidential campaign -- and possibly beyond."
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