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NEWS
Andrea K. Walker | April 17, 2012
Severely injured patients are more likely to survive if they are transported to a hospital by helicopter than by ambulance, new Johns Hopkins research has found. The use of  helicopters has been scrutinized because they may crash and end up killing people. They are also expensive to operate. But the study found that patients transported by helicopter are 16 percent more likely to survive than those who travel by land.  “We know helicopter trips are costly and carry some risks, but this research shows they do save lives,”  study senior author Dr. Adil Haider, an associate professor of surgery, anesthesiology and critical care medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a statement.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | April 21, 2014
A doctor with the The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins has received one of 14 grants totaling $5 million to support research of pancreatic cancer. The $1 million grant, awarded by The  Pancreatic Cancer Action Network  and the  American Association for Cancer Research ,  was given to Dr. Dung T. Le. The grants are aimed at research that could help improve pancreatic cancer survival rates. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network has a goal to double pancreatic cancer survival by 2020.
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NEWS
February 25, 1992
More than 80 percent of all people undergoing liver transplants at Johns Hopkins Hospital are surviving for two years after surgery -- a record that enables Medicare to cover the once-experimental operations, hospital officials said.Hopkins is the 13th hospital nationwide to earn Medicare coverage for liver transplants since April. That was when the government added liver transplants for disabled and elderly people to the list of "reasonable and necessary" surgeries eligible for payments.
EXPLORE
September 3, 2013
The National Automobile Dealers Charitable Foundation will make a donation of CPR training aids to the Level Volunteer Fire Company on Thursday, Sept. 5 at 10 a.m. at the fire station at 3633 Level Village Road in Havre de Grace. Charlie Walls of Plaza Ford in Bel Air will be on hand to present the members of Level VFC with several CPR mannequins, which will be used to teach pre-hospital care providers and citizens high performance CPR. Quality Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation improves survival from cardiac arrest.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2007
ImClone Systems Inc. Shares climbed $6.97, or 18.4 percent, to $44.90 after the company said the drug Erbitux improved the survival rate of patients with the most common type of lung cancer in a late-stage study.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | April 21, 2014
A doctor with the The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins has received one of 14 grants totaling $5 million to support research of pancreatic cancer. The $1 million grant, awarded by The  Pancreatic Cancer Action Network  and the  American Association for Cancer Research ,  was given to Dr. Dung T. Le. The grants are aimed at research that could help improve pancreatic cancer survival rates. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network has a goal to double pancreatic cancer survival by 2020.
NEWS
By Albert Sehlstedt Jr. Lynda Robinson of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | October 28, 1991
Dr. R Adams Cowley, the visionary and sometimes abrasive surgeon at the University of Maryland who established a world renowned shock trauma center to treat severely injured people, died yesterday at his Baltimore home. He was 74.Dr. Cowley, who suffered from heart disease for years, died of apparent coronary failure at 2:17 p.m.Dr. Cowley was native of Utah who received his medical degree from the University of Maryland in 1944. He propounded the theory that there was a "golden hour" in the ebbing lives of accident victims when they could be saved if specially trained doctors and nurses could exercise their skills in a properly equipped surgical setting.
EXPLORE
September 3, 2013
The National Automobile Dealers Charitable Foundation will make a donation of CPR training aids to the Level Volunteer Fire Company on Thursday, Sept. 5 at 10 a.m. at the fire station at 3633 Level Village Road in Havre de Grace. Charlie Walls of Plaza Ford in Bel Air will be on hand to present the members of Level VFC with several CPR mannequins, which will be used to teach pre-hospital care providers and citizens high performance CPR. Quality Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation improves survival from cardiac arrest.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | January 6, 2013
Like all parents, John and Tammy Carver face daily challenges in trying to raise a large brood. But for the Manchester couple, who have adopted six youngsters from orphanages in Russia and Belarus between 1997 and 2004, those challenges also include helping their youngest child fight cancer. Juliana Carver, 11, is now in the middle of 36 weeks of chemotherapy, most of which is performed on an in-patient basis at Baltimore's Sinai Hospital. "I'm a little bit tired," said Juliana, who is being treated by a team of three oncologists.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | December 22, 2006
Who should be screened for lung cancer with the new, low-dose CT scans? It's a tough call because doctors disagree and insurance doesn't pay for it, so if you do opt for this noninvasive test, you'll be paying out of pocket -- about $300. In October, the New England Journal of Medicine published a study of more than 30,000 current and former smokers and found that screening, which can catch lung cancers very early, at Stage I, was linked to a projected 88 percent, 10-year survival rate if patients were treated promptly with surgery.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2013
Maryland Shock Trauma Center patients who had previously undergone kidney, liver, lung and other organ transplants recovered as well as the general population, according to a University of Maryland study that experts say demonstrates the resiliency of transplanted organs. But they were more likely than their peers who had not suffered traumatic injuries to later reject transplanted organs, the study found. That raises new questions about the immune response that trauma can trigger and how it affects transplant patients.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
It is well known that HPV (human papillomavirus) can lead to deadly cervical cancer in women, but the virus is causing cancer in men as well. Throat cancers caused by HPV are showing up typically in men with little or no history of smoking, said Dr. Kevin J. Cullen, an oncologist who specializes in treating head and neck cancers. Cullen, the director of the University of Maryland's Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, talks about the growing cases of HPV-related throat cancers.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | January 6, 2013
Like all parents, John and Tammy Carver face daily challenges in trying to raise a large brood. But for the Manchester couple, who have adopted six youngsters from orphanages in Russia and Belarus between 1997 and 2004, those challenges also include helping their youngest child fight cancer. Juliana Carver, 11, is now in the middle of 36 weeks of chemotherapy, most of which is performed on an in-patient basis at Baltimore's Sinai Hospital. "I'm a little bit tired," said Juliana, who is being treated by a team of three oncologists.
NEWS
Andrea K. Walker | April 17, 2012
Severely injured patients are more likely to survive if they are transported to a hospital by helicopter than by ambulance, new Johns Hopkins research has found. The use of  helicopters has been scrutinized because they may crash and end up killing people. They are also expensive to operate. But the study found that patients transported by helicopter are 16 percent more likely to survive than those who travel by land.  “We know helicopter trips are costly and carry some risks, but this research shows they do save lives,”  study senior author Dr. Adil Haider, an associate professor of surgery, anesthesiology and critical care medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Tribune Newspapers | November 18, 2009
Mechanical pumps originally designed to supplement the pumping action of a failing heart and keep the patient alive until a transplant could be found have taken a major step toward becoming a permanent treatment - a development that could expand their use to tens of thousands of patients in the United States. Results presented Tuesday at the Orlando, Fla., meeting of the American Heart Association showed that a new type of device doubled the two-year survival of heart failure patients.
FEATURES
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | January 17, 2008
Joe Moffett wishes the spit test was available four years ago, before the tumor near the base of his tongue put him through months of radiation treatments, chemotherapy and surgery -- plus the hassle of taking nourishment through a feeding tube inserted at Johns Hopkins Hospital. "Having a test out there, I could have avoided a whole lot. But still, I thank the good Lord I'm alive, and I'm excited about this test. It could help a lot of people," said Moffett, 69, a retired Army pilot from Dillon, S.C. Researchers at Hopkins published findings this month showing they are close to developing a mouth rinse that can detect head and neck cancer such as Moffett's.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2013
Maryland Shock Trauma Center patients who had previously undergone kidney, liver, lung and other organ transplants recovered as well as the general population, according to a University of Maryland study that experts say demonstrates the resiliency of transplanted organs. But they were more likely than their peers who had not suffered traumatic injuries to later reject transplanted organs, the study found. That raises new questions about the immune response that trauma can trigger and how it affects transplant patients.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | May 20, 1994
Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the disease that killed Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, is an increasingly common form of cancer that often responds to treatment but proves tragically persistent in many cases.It is a cancer of the lymph system, the network of nodes and vessels that plays a major role in protecting the body against infection.The cancer usually appears first as a painless swelling of lymph nodes clustered in the neck, armpit or groin, but it can also attack solid organs first.Early symptoms can also include anemia, weight loss and fever.
BUSINESS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | December 19, 2007
A Rockville biotech company announced yesterday that it has cleared a major hurdle in fulfilling a $165.2 million federal contract to supply a new anthrax drug. Human Genome Sciences Inc. says its clinical trials show that a single dose of ABthrax improved survival rates up to 64 percent in monkeys infected with anthrax over a 28-day period. The drug also proved safe in trials where it was given to 180 human volunteers. "The most challenging scientific work is behind us," Dr. David C. Stump, a physician who is executive vice president, told reporters in a telephone briefing yesterday.
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