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NEWS
By Staff Report | September 30, 1992
The results of a survey mailed to 28,000 Columbia residents will be reviewed by the Columbia Council before it votes on a proposal to restrict memberships at the Hobbit's Glen Golf Course.The proposal, made by John Hansen, chairman of the council, would bar sales of so-called annual and daily memberships to people who don't pay the Columbia Association an annual assessment fee.Golfers who now hold those memberships could continue to renew their memberships under the proposal. And those who purchase so-called package plan memberships would also be allowed to buy and renew those memberships, under the Hansen proposal.
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NEWS
May 5, 2014
The Chesapeake Bay Blue Crab is an omnivore. If a favorite food like worms, plants or baby clams is unavailable, it switches to something else. Maryland's human denizens may want to seriously consider doing that same thing. That's because the latest news regarding one of Maryland's favorite seafood delicacies isn't good. For the second straight year, the bay's crab population is in decline, with the number of female crabs - the most critical factor for future reproduction - below what biologists regard as safe to maintain the current stock.
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NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2004
The Anne Arundel County teachers union released results yesterday of a recent survey showing that voters think education is a more pressing issue than the economy or the county's growth and, separately, would support a tax increase, if needed. The phone survey of 819 randomly selected Anne Arundel voters found that a majority was in favor of a slightly higher income tax rate that would cost the average household an extra $75 a year. The tax-increase question was not specifically linked to education.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
The Chesapeake Bay's blue crab population remains in a serious slump for the second straight year, with the number of females dropping to a dangerously low level, officials announced Thursday. Severe winter weather, not overfishing, is largely to blame, officials said. But to improve chances of a rebound, Maryland and Virginia both plan to cut back on the bay harvest this year - a move likely to hurt the region's struggling watermen and cost crab-loving consumers, pushing high prices higher still.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2003
The results of a $248,000 survey commissioned by the Howard County school system show that although parents are generally satisfied with educational offerings, teachers have serious doubts about the district's leadership. Sixty percent of teachers responding to the survey - which was given to thousands of parents, support staff, administrators, students, instructors and district-level managers in May - indicated low confidence in Superintendent John R. O'Rourke and his staff to "provide the leadership and resources" they need.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | July 15, 2013
The Baltimore city school system released this month the results of its annual school climate surveys, now called "School Surveys," which poll staff, students and parents on their satisfaction with everything from academic support to school safety. While the school district reported that the results of the survey were generally positive when it came to overall satisfaction with schools--except their physical infrastructure--the results also show that there was notable dissatisfaction with the climate in several of them.  Of note, staff and students responded that there is a lack of discipline and consequences in schools, a reoccuring conversation in the district since it implemented a student discipline code that has sought to discourage suspensions for non-violent offenses.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | November 27, 1991
NEW YORK -- As the holiday retailing season begins, the mood of the nation's shoppers has fallen to the lowest level since the dog days of the 1980 recession.Consumer confidence, an important indicator of business conditions, has eroded badly this month, according to a survey released yesterday by the Conference Board, a New York-based business research group. The drop extended a slide that began this summer, as euphoria from the Persian Gulf war dissipated.And that's a disturbing sign for retailers and manufacturers who already have suffered through two difficult years.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2000
More than four out of five residents of the Washington-Baltimore area support the effort to bring the Olympic Games to the region in 2012, according to a recent survey commissioned by local Olympic organizers. The poll also found that nearly seven of 10 area residents would attend the Games if they came to the region. "It just reinforces that the people in the region are excited about the Olympics," said Dan Knise, president and chief executive officer of the Washington-Baltimore Regional 2012 Coalition.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | October 17, 1992
In an unusual move, the Baltimore County Planning Board has rejected a recommendation that would have cleared the way for development around one of the county's busiest intersections.York Road at Burke Avenue is a major artery for Towson area employees heading to and from work.Public works officials had asked that the designation of the intersection at the southern edge of central Towson be upgraded because surveys show congestion there may be easing.Stephen E. Weber, assistant traffic engineer for the county Bureau of Traffic Engineering, said this was the first time the board had rejected a recommendation on an intersection's designation since the county's Basic Services Law went into affect in 1979.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | March 4, 2007
Though the recent count of the homeless population in Harford County revealed a 20 percent increase over two years ago, more people are opting for shelters or other programs instead of living on the streets, county social services officials say. The federally mandated count in late January tallied 145 homeless people countywide, including eight who decline to use the county's seasonal emergency shelter or other options. "It is a large increase, but the breakdown shows more people are living in shelters and taking advantage of our transitional housing programs," said Elizabeth Meadows, community development coordinator of the county community services department, of the biennial count.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | July 15, 2013
The Baltimore city school system released this month the results of its annual school climate surveys, now called "School Surveys," which poll staff, students and parents on their satisfaction with everything from academic support to school safety. While the school district reported that the results of the survey were generally positive when it came to overall satisfaction with schools--except their physical infrastructure--the results also show that there was notable dissatisfaction with the climate in several of them.  Of note, staff and students responded that there is a lack of discipline and consequences in schools, a reoccuring conversation in the district since it implemented a student discipline code that has sought to discourage suspensions for non-violent offenses.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
Tisa L. Silver-Canady, who counsels University of Maryland, Baltimore students about loan repayments and runs other financial education programs at the school, realized toward the end of last year that she had not used about a third of her vacation time. Last year, the assistant director of financial eduction and wellness in the university's office of student financial assistance and education took two brief trips, one for work, the other a vacation that included a conference related to her job. And she took two days off to move to a new house.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 16, 2012
The hunter-backed effort to bring wild elk back to western Maryland is gaining some steam, though fierce resistance remains in key quarters. A survey done by pro-hunting groups finds that nearly three-fourths of Marylanders asked favor restoring the large, majestic ungulates to the state's mountainous region, which hasn't seen any of the animals since the 1700s. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources has been working with the Maryland Legislative Sportsmen's Foundation and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation to review the biological, social and economic feasibility of restoring the species in the state.  The telephone survey, done by Responsive Management , a Virginia-based polling firm, was underwritten by the two foundations, according to a DNR press release about it. While the survey found widespread public support for bringing elk back to Maryland, the survey also found a strong current of opposition among some western Maryland farmers and others  who feared the large animals could jeopardize their livelihood, spread disease or damage their property.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
Rebounding from near-collapse four years ago, the Chesapeake Bay's blue crabs are more plentiful than they've been in nearly two decades, with a record crop of young, Maryland officials announced Thursday. The annual winter survey of Maryland and Virginia waters found an estimated 764 million crabs baywide — two-thirds more than last year and the highest since 1993, officials said. The number of juvenile crabs nearly tripled to 587 million, the most seen since the survey began 22 years ago. That should mean there'll be plenty of the crustaceans available this year, especially in late summer.
NEWS
By Catherine Goldstead | January 17, 2012
As a daily commuter who rides the Maryland Transit Administration's #11 bus northbound in the morning and southbound in the evening, I have to wonder: Could there be a more unreliable organization than the MTA? I have certainly never encountered one. The MTA must put forth a more significant effort to try to keep bus, train and light rail running on schedule than current results reflect. Two months ago, when I waited at a stop for two full hours while as many as four scheduled buses were no-shows, I called customer service - which offered absolutely no help.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2011
Do you like your job? Do you like your bosses? If so, why? These are the key questions behind this special publication by The Baltimore Sun. During these unsettled economic times, learning what makes workers happy is crucial information for companies. Budgets may be lean, but firms can take affordable steps to improve their employees' morale - sometimes it can be as simple as learning the workers' names or sharing information. That's not only good for employees; a company's bottom line also can benefit from happier workers.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | June 15, 2006
A survey of Baltimore students, teachers and parents shows an overall perception that city schools were safer and more welcoming in the 2005-2006 school year than in the year before. But the survey also highlighted the need for the school system to do more to improve safety in middle schools, where 46 percent of pupils said student possession of weapons such as guns or knives was a "moderate" or "major" problem. Forty-one percent of middle school pupils also noted problems with student alcohol and drug abuse.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 28, 2011
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has famously declared that she wants her next job title to be "grandmother. " But a Harris Poll indicates that Mrs. Clinton is just about the only politician with a job approval rating above sea level. And a second survey suggests that American moms - remember the role of the soccer mom in 1996? - would rather vote for her for president than Barack Obama or any of the Republican candidates. It might be time to change the date on those "Hillary 2008" buttons.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
Members of the Howard County school system's largest employee union have been instructed not to reveal results of an annual job satisfaction survey to administrators until leaders devise a strategy they hope will force top officials to improve working conditions at some schools. Ann DeLacy, president of the Howard County Education Association, said her organization's board of directors will meet March 3 to discuss the best way to share the results with the administration. "We need to formulate a strategy," DeLacy told a room of HCEA representatives from all schools during a meeting Tuesday.
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