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NEWS
July 27, 2010
Cry me a river! It's inconvenient to have neighbors applying for jobs in the defense and intelligence sectors because you might get interviewed ("Secrecy industry hits home," Commentary, July 26)? You blame the loss of neighborhood camaraderie on the fact that local children grow up to work for NSA, etc. Let's be real, the historic decline in citizens participating in civic life and neighborhood exchanges is nationwide and cannot be solely attributed to the presence of the intelligence and defense industries.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Baltimore police released surveillance photos of the suspects in a stabbing and robbery of a man this summer in Federal Hill. On Aug. 17, police say Sal Schittino , 24, was left in critical condition by four teens on mopeds in the 1200 block of Wall Street. Police say the teens rode in tandem on a green and a black scooter when they approached Schittino. One of the teens got off the black scooter and stabbed him several times. Police described the assailant as black, wearing a light colored T-shirt and dark pants.
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NEWS
By Firmin DeBrabander | May 16, 2012
The surveillance state expands. The Patriot Act allows our phones to be wiretapped. Our email and Internet transactions leave a trail for some to follow. The police can access our GPS location data through our smartphones without a warrant. Retailers record our purchasing habits with painstaking detail. Apparently, Target studies those purchases to determine when customers are pregnant - in the second trimester, no less - for specialized marketing purposes. And now, there will be surveillance drones.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
For all the revolutionary technological change rocking media these days, the TMZ video of Ray Rice punching Janay Palmer in a casino elevator is a stark reminder of the enduring and awesome power of the image. The two punches Rice delivers to his then fiancee take up only about four seconds of actual video time, yet they instantly blew away more than seven months of speculation, spin, damage control and image building from high-priced attorneys, fellow players, sports-media sympathizers, the Ravens organization and the National Football League.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Fleischer Tamen and Joan Fleischer Tamen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 22, 2002
The next time you log on at work, the boss could be gathering data to see if you're a star - or a slacker. Computer technology can document, analyze, measure and monitor almost every aspect of an employee's performance. It can count keystrokes per minute, as well as clock your workday like a punch card. It can track distractions such as time spent at an eBay auction or a naughty cyber site. Software can even show managers what employees are saying over instant messages, or how much time they're spending on the phone.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | February 22, 2012
Baltimore police have released two pictures of possible suspects in Tuesday night's shooting of a customer during a holdup of a Royal Farms store in Hamilton. The Sun's Steve Kilar wrote: "According to spokesman Det. Donny Moses, officers responded about 9:40 p.m. to reports of a shooting at the store. There, they found a 46-year-old man who had been shot in the chest. "He was conscious and breathing as medics took him to Johns Hopkins Hospital. As of 9 a.m. Wednesday, Moses said the victim was hospitalized in good condition and, barring any setbacks, was scheduled for release later in the day. "According to witnesses, two seemingly masked men - one armed with a silver handgun - came in and announced a robbery, Moses said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2012
When Baltimore first installed crime cameras in 2005, they numbered fewer than 200 and were largely confined to high-crime areas. Two mayors later, the number of cameras in the city's police surveillance system has quadrupled. Baltimore owns 583 and has access to feeds from more than 250 installed by various businesses. Now that system is likely to become much larger. The city's Board of Estimates agreed last week to create a database that will make it easier for businesses to give the Police Department access to their private security cameras.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN REPORTER | November 2, 2006
The Maryland Transit Administration has begun installing an advanced surveillance system at its Metro, MARC train and light rail stations to protect against terrorism and reduce crime, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. announced yesterday. MTA officials held a news conference at the Camden Yards Light Rail and MARC station to demonstrate the new technology, which is designed to provide around-the-clock coverage at transit stations. Ehrlich said the MTA is one of the first transit agencies in the country to introduce the technology, which relies on digital security cameras and a computer software program to analyze images.
NEWS
By HERBERT LONDON | March 29, 2006
The American Civil Liberties Union and several other organizations have brought two well-publicized lawsuits against the Bush administration on the issue of "unauthorized" domestic spying. Of course, the plaintiffs cannot demonstrate that they have been targeted by the surveillance program, and the claim that this is domestic spying is not technically accurate because only those conversations with suspected terrorists outside the United States are considered. Plaintiffs include a gaggle of left-wingers, including the Council on American Islamic Relations, Greenpeace, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and a writer for the Nation, among others.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
On her first full day on the job, the new Anne Arundel County executive shut down a surveillance operation inside the county office building that included 500 cameras recording minute-by-minute activity in and around numerous county government facilities. County Executive Laura Neuman said she became "suspicious" upon discovering the surveillance equipment, and called law enforcement officials about the operation, which was conducted from a small, unmarked room at the Arundel Center complex that few seemed to know about.
NEWS
August 4, 2014
In his commentary, "Ray Rice is not a victim" (July 31), Jacob Simpson sets us women back to pre-women's suffrage era. I understand he is a pastor and advocate against domestic violence, that's great, and I'm sure everyone he assists is grateful for that; we need more people like him in this world. What we don't need, however, is to hear from men who claim to "care" about Ray Rice's wife because she was "a victim" of alleged domestic violence. The same men who say "you should never put your hands on a woman" are probably saying that because they feel "women" are too fragile, weak or incapable of expelling the same violent tendencies and/or actions that Mr. Rice is being accused of doing to his then-fiancee.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
The Town of Ocean City is taking multiple steps to increase safety on the boardwalk this summer, police officials said. Visitors on Memorial Day will notice increased surveillance cameras placed in strategic locations along the boardwalk. The city has always had a few cameras in position but those were mostly used for tourism purposes, said Lindsay O'Neal, spokeswoman for the Ocean City Police Department. "We will have dozen or so cameras total on the boardwalk - and we will have one of our employees monitoring the cameras," said O'Neal, adding that in the past the cameras were not generally used for policing purposes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
An emotionally disturbed man drives a landscaping truck into the lobby of Baltimore TV station WMAR around noon and then spends the afternoon inside the building watching other TV outlets covering his five-hour standoff with police. Sounds like a media story to me. It sounds as if it could be the story of someone with a troubled mind literally trying to break his way into the bright, shiny world of television - and accomplishing it, for a few hours at least, through his act of violence.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
City officials promised a doubling of security on the collapsed block of East 26th Street in Charles Village on Monday after two of its 19 evacuated homes were reported broken into. One homeowner reported $250 worth of damage to a window frame after he noticed his second-story air conditioning unit had been forced into the home, according to a police report. Residents of another home reported missing nearly $1,200 in cash and other personal items - including shoes, jewelry and a laptop computer - after it was determined there had been a break-in there as well.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 18, 2014
The Pulitzer Prizes to two news outlets that cooperated with whistleblower Edward Snowden in the disclosure of widespread National Security Agency surveillance of electronic communications at home and abroad has U.S. officialdom in a dither. With the exiled Mr. Snowden harbored in Russia and widely branded at home as a traitor for leaking the voluminous evidence to reporters working for The Washington Post and the U.S. arm of Britain's Guardian newspaper, the Pulitzer committee came down squarely on the side of freedom of the press.
NEWS
April 10, 2014
Thanks for publishing the article "Lawsuit targets use of warrantless NSA wiretaps in criminal prosecutions" (April 7). It seems that Jamshid Muhtorov, accused of providing support to a terrorist group, was a victim of FBI and National Security Agency surveillance, as his phone conversations were heard and his emails read. The article indicated that the evidence was gathered "under a 2008 law that authorizes foreign intelligence surveillance without warrants. " A basic legal tenet is that a defendant, through the discovery process, has the right to see the government's evidence.
NEWS
By Chet Dembeck | January 9, 2007
I wonder how many of those who voted for Gov.-elect Martin O'Malley realized they were also voting for an open-ended, statewide expansion of citizen surveillance that includes "watch centers" and "watch lists"? You may think this sounds Orwellian, but it's no joke. Mr. O'Malley never hid his strong intention to expand the use of technology and police resources to fight crime and terrorism; he simply failed to outline any safeguards that would ensure such increased surveillance wouldn't be abused to spy on law-abiding citizens for political or any other reasons.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 1, 2007
CINCINNATI -- A lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union urged a federal appeals court yesterday to affirm a lower court decision that the Bush administration's Terrorist Surveillance Program is illegal and that "the president has to obey the law." But a Justice Department lawyer insisted the program is legal and called on the judges to overturn the ruling, while also arguing that the case is now moot. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals peppered them with questions about broad constitutional principles as well as the issue of whether the ACLU's clients have standing to challenge the program.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
He was captured on video using an ATM in Beltsville, later at a McDonald's in Burtonsville and then arriving in a taxi at The Mall in Columbia on Jan. 25. Nineteen-year-old Darion Marcus Aguilar also left another tip for investigators by uploading a "selfie" taken inside the store's dressing room moments before he started shooting, creating one final freeze-frame marking the precise time of his attack. Howard County police were not able to trace Aguilar's exact steps in the hours before he opened fire in the mall, killing two clothing store clerks, but surveillance video from around the region helped them account for his actions from the time he left home in College Park at 5:15 a.m. and fired his first shots at 11:14 a.m. Cameras aren't exactly everywhere - they captured Aguilar riding escalators in the mall but missed him as police say he waited near the food court before the shooting - but the range of footage released last week showed just how broad their coverage has become.
NEWS
By Christi Parsons and Ken Dilanian, Tribune Newspapers | January 17, 2014
President Obama proposed new safeguards for the government's vast surveillance of communications in the U.S. and abroad, adding additional judicial review and disclosure requirements, but largely leaving in place programs that he said were needed to "remain vigilant in the face of threats. " His proposals, unveiled in a long-anticipated speech on Friday, drew warm reviews from intelligence officials, but expressions of disappointment from many civil liberties activists and some prominent technology company executives.
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