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By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2012
Some community leaders want to increase the property surtax in Midtown Baltimore by more than a third to pay for additional security cameras and safety patrols — a plan that has divided residents over whether a tax increase and public safety upgrades are needed. The proposal, which is being pushed primarily by residents of Charles North and Mount Vernon, is set for a vote Wednesday night by the Midtown Community Benefits District's board of directors. Under the proposal, property owners would pay 18.2 cents for every $100 dollars in assessed value, 5 cents more than the current rate.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2012
Some community leaders want to increase the property surtax in Midtown Baltimore by more than a third to pay for additional security cameras and safety patrols — a plan that has divided residents over whether a tax increase and public safety upgrades are needed. The proposal, which is being pushed primarily by residents of Charles North and Mount Vernon, is set for a vote Wednesday night by the Midtown Community Benefits District's board of directors. Under the proposal, property owners would pay 18.2 cents for every $100 dollars in assessed value, 5 cents more than the current rate.
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NEWS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | March 13, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A "special benefits district" for downtown Baltimore, where commercial building owners would pay a surtax for cleaner streets and more security, cleared its last major hurdle in the General Assembly yesterday.The Baltimore Senate delegation voted to approve the legislation, which other lawmakers have agreed to consider a local issue, subject only to the decisions of city legislators.With the House delegation's approval of the measure earlier this week, yesterday's 8-1 vote means the House and Senate bills will become law if the two delegations can settle minor differences between their versions.
BUSINESS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | March 4, 1995
Maryland House and Senate conferees ended a two-week stalemate yesterday by agreeing to lower the unemployment insurance surcharge on businesses to 1.1 percent from 1.7 percent and raise the benefits for the jobless to $250 a week from $223.The emergency legislation was expected to be approved by the full House and Senate Monday night. It would then be sent immediately to Gov. Parris N. Glendening for his signature. Notices with the new rates should be mailed to businesses this month.Mr. Glendening, who earlier yesterday morning chastised the legislature for being slow in reaching a compromise, called the bill "good for Maryland and Maryland businesses."
NEWS
By Stephen E. Nordlinger and Stephen E. Nordlinger,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 6, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Representative Dan Rostenkowski, D-Ill., chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, advocated yesterday that an income surtax be imposed to pay for the American forces in the Persian Gulf.The extra tax would be added to whatever a taxpayer already owes.The surcharge -- which would cover the U.S. share of the cost of Operation Desert Shield, whether or not a war occurs -- would need to be about 5 percent, raising an estimated $13.5 billion in 1991, according to the Congressional Budget Office.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Seizing the Republican banner of "family values," House Democrats passed legislation yesterday intended to keep troubled families together and prevent them from going hungry.Democrats insisted that the plan, which would be paid for by higher taxes on millionaires, offered Congress a chance to do more than talk about helping families. Rep. Patricia Schroeder, D-Colo., said the bill shows "who's for kids and who's just kidding."The bill was adopted on a vote of 256-163, with 236 Democrats, 19 Republicans and one independent in favor and 19 Democrats and 144 Republicans opposed.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 31, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Man bit dog yesterday: Business called for higher taxes.At a hearing before a House committee, representatives of thousands of Maryland businesses endorsed a Schaefer administration plan to raise an immediate $61 million in unemployment insurance taxes.But despite a strong show of support from the state chamber of commerce and other groups, there was dissension. Bethlehem Steel Corp. warned that the proposed changes would be "catastrophic to the economy," particularly a plan to raise the amount of payroll on which unemployment insurance taxes are levied.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 16, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- To address an annual shortfall of about $36 million, the state recommended yesterday that unemployment insurance taxes be increased by 0.2 percent a year, or $14 per employee, for all employers.The maximum tax rate was scheduled to rise from 6.0 percent to 6.5 percent July 1. So the new proposal, if approved by the General Assembly, would increase the top rate to 6.7 percent, or $469 per employee each year.Companies are taxed on the first $7,000 of each employee's salary, and the tax rate is based on the amount of employee turnover.
BUSINESS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | March 4, 1995
Maryland House and Senate conferees ended a two-week stalemate yesterday by agreeing to lower the unemployment insurance surcharge on businesses to 1.1 percent from 1.7 percent and raise the benefits for the jobless to $250 a week from $223.The emergency legislation was expected to be approved by the full House and Senate Monday night. It would then be sent immediately to Gov. Parris N. Glendening for his signature. Notices with the new rates should be mailed to businesses this month.Mr. Glendening, who earlier yesterday morning chastised the legislature for being slow in reaching a compromise, called the bill "good for Maryland and Maryland businesses."
NEWS
October 10, 1994
Maintaining the current method of trash collection in Carroll County serves the interest of the haulers at the expense of the public. The time has come for the county commissioners to decide whether they will continue to allow small garbage haulers to dictate the county's solid waste collection policy.The evidence is undeniable -- people who don't live in the five Carroll municipalities that have a contract with Waste Management Inc. or in Sykesville, which collects it own trash, pay at least twice as much for their weekly collection.
NEWS
October 10, 1994
Maintaining the current method of trash collection in Carroll County serves the interest of the haulers at the expense of the public. The time has come for the county commissioners to decide whether they will continue to allow small garbage haulers to dictate the county's solid waste collection policy.The evidence is undeniable -- people who don't live in the five Carroll municipalities that have a contract with Waste Management Inc. or in Sykesville, which collects it own trash, pay at least twice as much for their weekly collection.
NEWS
December 30, 1993
Surtax HogwashThe public should support legislation in the 1994 General Assembly to extend the surtax on high incomes.As a middle class person, I resent having to pay what amounts to a higher tax rate than upper income Marylanders, when sales taxes and Social Security are figured in.The surtax on high incomes at least begins to balance the situation. And on top of that, we all know the state needs the additional revenue to pay for education and infrastructure and to fight crime.The argument that the surtax has a negative effect on Maryland's business climate is hogwash.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Seizing the Republican banner of "family values," House Democrats passed legislation yesterday intended to keep troubled families together and prevent them from going hungry.Democrats insisted that the plan, which would be paid for by higher taxes on millionaires, offered Congress a chance to do more than talk about helping families. Rep. Patricia Schroeder, D-Colo., said the bill shows "who's for kids and who's just kidding."The bill was adopted on a vote of 256-163, with 236 Democrats, 19 Republicans and one independent in favor and 19 Democrats and 144 Republicans opposed.
NEWS
March 15, 1992
The perpetual imbalance in Maryland's unemployment insurance fund needs fixing. Too little money flows in during good times; too much seeps out in bad. A surtax is used to bridge the gap. But perversely, it forces businesses to take a major tax hit at precisely the time they can least afford it.A bill making its way through the General Assembly would smooth out these peaks and valleys by taxing businesses more in lean times to provide a cushion for darker...
NEWS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | March 13, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A "special benefits district" for downtown Baltimore, where commercial building owners would pay a surtax for cleaner streets and more security, cleared its last major hurdle in the General Assembly yesterday.The Baltimore Senate delegation voted to approve the legislation, which other lawmakers have agreed to consider a local issue, subject only to the decisions of city legislators.With the House delegation's approval of the measure earlier this week, yesterday's 8-1 vote means the House and Senate bills will become law if the two delegations can settle minor differences between their versions.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | February 28, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The idea wouldn't be to turn Baltimore's downtown district into a shopping center, but it's not a bad way to think about it, according to its proponents.Like a shopping center, a "special benefits district" that city leaders would like to create would impose extra charges on its inhabitants to pay for special benefits such as heightened security, stepped-up maintenance and possibly even joint marketing programs.Most owners of private buildings that pay property taxes probably would pay an extra 5 percent under a bill being considered by the House Ways and Means Committee.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 29, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- With more than $50 million a month in unemployment benefits being paid out -- almost twice last year's level -- state officials urged lawmakers yesterday to change Maryland's unemployment insurance law to slow the bleeding from the fund that pays benefits.The changes would increase each employer's unemployment insurance taxes by about 21.4 percent; raise the maximum level of emergency taxes the state could impose to boost the UI trust fund quickly; and allow the system to respond more quickly to downturns in the economy.
NEWS
March 15, 1992
The perpetual imbalance in Maryland's unemployment insurance fund needs fixing. Too little money flows in during good times; too much seeps out in bad. A surtax is used to bridge the gap. But perversely, it forces businesses to take a major tax hit at precisely the time they can least afford it.A bill making its way through the General Assembly would smooth out these peaks and valleys by taxing businesses more in lean times to provide a cushion for darker...
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | February 4, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A plan to make the state Insurance Division an independent agency, with the needed financing provided by a surtax on all Maryland insurers, will be introduced in the General Assembly this week with the governor's support.The bill will include an annual surtax on all insurers based in Maryland and "most likely" will remove the Insurance Division from the Department of Licensing and Regulation, David Iannucci, Gov. William Donald Schaefer's chief legislative officer, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 4, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A plan to make the state Insurance Division an independent agency, with the needed financing provided by a surtax on all Maryland insurers, will be introduced in the General Assembly this week with the governor's support.The bill will include an annual surtax on all insurers based in Maryland and "most likely" will remove the Insurance Division from the Department of Licensing and Regulation, David Iannucci, Gov. William Donald Schaefer's chief legislative officer, said yesterday.
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