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By Diane Browndmbrown@comcast.net | June 13, 2011
I seemed to have thrown a Starbucks barista for a loop a couple of weeks ago, when I asked for a slice of pound cake and a glass of skim milk. She asked her co-coffeemaker, "Can we do that?" The other replied, "I guess so. " "How much do we charge for the milk?" I paid around $4.50 for the two items, then moved to the seating area next to Starbucks, where Target offers an assortment of sandwiches and soft drinks. Whoa. That's where I saw bottles of milk for a buck. So now I know: Grab your cake from Starbucks, then walk six feet if you want cheap milk.
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NEWS
February 11, 2014
I really wish I was in the speed camera consulting business in Baltimore right now, as I could make a killing ( "City takes step toward new speed camera program Feb. 5). Why is this whole speed camera debacle turning into such a surreal comedy? One answer might be that there is such a total disconnect from city government and the people they serve. This seems so evident by all the arrogant proclamations issued by those defending the speed camera program. It is not so much a defense as a "you don't need to know, period.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 16, 2003
Put any group of art critics or historians together in a room, and they could argue for hours over the question of whether cubism or surrealism was the most influential modern art movement of the 20th century. My vote goes to surrealism, if only because it has so thoroughly penetrated American popular culture - everything from fashion photos to record-album covers to the bizarre, unintentional montages of TV images strung together by channel-surfing couch potatoes. We're so used to this kind of pap surrealism we hardly any longer recognize its spiritual descent from the art of such early 20th-century pioneers as Man Ray, Rene Magritte and Salvador Dali.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Anthony Landi, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
"Hold on. I'm in a weird place," said Zach Williams, leader of The Lone Bellow, as he lost reception while passing through a mountain range over the phone on Wednesday. That "weird place" could also be applied to his music career at the moment. The Brooklyn Americana trio is in a transitional phase, shifting from indie darlings to the next big thing. What started as a creative outlet for Williams has become a full-fledged (and critically acclaimed) band, which resulted in the members quitting their day jobs to play Austin, Texas' annual South by Southwest festival and take up music full-time.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 13, 1999
(This is Glenn McNatt's first column as The Sun's new art critic)There's a story that famed photojournalist Henri Cartier-Bresson once was asked to exhibit his pictures in a show of surrealist art.Bresson's philosophy of "the decisive moment" -- the exact instant in which the formal elements of a picture come together to form a pleasing visual harmony -- made him a prime candidate for such a show. Still, the photographer politely declined.Apparently, Bresson thought the label surrealism (literally "more real than real")
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 16, 1996
"The Face of America" at the Baltimore Museum of Art is maddening and exhilarating, frustrating and rewarding, cluttered with works and bursting with ideas. Like America itself, this show is big, sprawling and hard to get a handle on, but getting to know it is worth the trouble.Subtitled "Modernist Art 1910-1950," it's an attempt to show the many aspects of the modern movement in this country through use of the museum's extensive collection. Five curators were involved in putting it together, and it looks it, containing about 240 works that include paintings, sculpture, prints, drawings, photographs, decorative arts and textiles.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 2003
I LIKE TO SEE. Because I like to see, I like to make art look as much like what it is I see," says artist Dave DeRan. Then, he says, laughing, "Art is fun." DeRan is the youngest son of five siblings born to an insurance salesman and schoolteacher-turned-postal worker native to Pylesville, in the northwest corner of rural Harford County - an area once claimed by Pennsylvania and Maryland before the Mason-Dixon survey. Over the past 30 years, in the community of Pylesville and Delta, Pa., DeRan has earned a living by selling art, including murals, watercolor or acrylic paintings, and prints of old buildings and realistic frogs and turtles, spring houses, and river landscapes, often in the same style as Andrew Wyeth.
FEATURES
By Larry Bleiberg and Larry Bleiberg,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 10, 1997
PUBOL, Spain -- Driving into northeastern Spain, you expect the countryside to look a little different.Maybe clocks really do drip from trees here. If only the landscape tilted at odd angles and the furniture were sexually active, it would explain so much about the region's most famous son, Salvador Dali.But even in the heart of Daliland, a surrealist sweep of Spanish countryside, the artist remains inexplicable seven years after his death. There's no obvious source for the outrageous imagination that made him one of the 20th century's most famous, controversial and, at times, just weirdest personalities.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 30, 2002
New York art dealer Leo Castelli had it. So did museum founders Henry Walters and Duncan Phillips. And both of Baltimore's Cone sisters, Etta and Claribel, had it, too. It's an "eye," of course: a combination of intuition, sensibility, training and personal experience that allows art lovers to spot a work of quality. And if you've ever doubted the utility of a good eye in appreciating contemporary art, a visit to the current show at Gallery International ought to convince you there's still a place for this time-honored faculty.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | April 28, 1992
Going to "Russian Artists' Expo: The Post-Glasnost Generation" is like stepping back into another world in art history terms -- at least before mid-century and, at times, centuries earlier than that. It's pleasant to see how remote it seems from our own.The show comes to the BAUhouse because Alexander Friedman, a University of Maryland law student who emigrated from the Soviet Union with his family in 1979, took a trip back in 1990. While there he met some artists interested in selling their works in the West, and on his return to the United States, he approached the BAUhouse about doing a show.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
The UMBC women's soccer team's path from worst to first in the America East is exactly what Leslie Wray envisioned when she was hired by the university in January 2012. But even the coach admitted that she was surprised at the speed at which the players and coaches were able to revitalize a program that went from 1-11-5 last year to 11-5-2 this fall. "Surreal is the right word," Wray said Monday morning. "It has been just absolutely amazing. I'm so proud of the players and the effort they put into this game.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
The realization that long-distance runner Hannah Oneda would represent the United States at the 2013 Pan Am Junior Athletics Championships in Medellin, Colombia, this weekend didn't fully hit the Westminster native and Winters Mill graduate until she opened a package sent by USA Track & Field recently. Inside the shipment was a suitcase, which included a backpack, a uniform, a podium outfit, a rain jacket, T-shirts and shorts - all embroidered with the Team USA logo. Oneda, a soon-to-be sophomore at Johns Hopkins who earned a spot on the national team by finishing third in the 5,000-meter race at the U.S. Junior National Track & Field championships on June 20 in Des Moines, Iowa, knew the gear was coming, but she was still in awe that her name was listed on the shipping label.
NEWS
Kevin Cowherd | May 6, 2012
You're an Orioles fan and the big question on your mind now is: How long will it last? A 9-6 win over the Boston Red Sox in 17 innings Sunday for their fifth win in a row and ninth in 11 games? Are you kidding me? With Adam Jones taking Darnell McDonald's cream puff fastball over Fenway Park's Green Monster for the game-winning three-run blast? And designated hitter Chris Davis on the mound for the Orioles, looking like Mariano Rivera as he strikes out Adrian Gonzalez with two on and one out before inducing a game-ending double play?
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | September 2, 2011
I am standing on the south side of Pratt Street, in the shadow of the Bromo Tower and caddy-corner to the Pratt Street Ale House, where I might have to head for a beer if my ears start bleeding. It's Friday afternoon, and 20 feet from me Indy car racers scream by at speeds of over 150 mph during practice runs for theBaltimore Grand Prix. Remember the old Mazda commercial with the tagline "zoom-zoom?" There is a whole lot of zoom-zooming going on. I keep looking around and thinking: Is this really Baltimore?
EXPLORE
By Diane Browndmbrown@comcast.net | June 13, 2011
I seemed to have thrown a Starbucks barista for a loop a couple of weeks ago, when I asked for a slice of pound cake and a glass of skim milk. She asked her co-coffeemaker, "Can we do that?" The other replied, "I guess so. " "How much do we charge for the milk?" I paid around $4.50 for the two items, then moved to the seating area next to Starbucks, where Target offers an assortment of sandwiches and soft drinks. Whoa. That's where I saw bottles of milk for a buck. So now I know: Grab your cake from Starbucks, then walk six feet if you want cheap milk.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2010
In the infield, three blondes sat with green cloths draped around their necks, as if they were about to get haircuts or a touch-up on their roots. Their images were projected onto a screen and, through the magic of "green-screen technology, their heads appeared atop three shimmying bodies dancing to the Black-Eyed Peas' "Boom Boom Pow." They left with free DVD copies of their performance. Meanwhile, young people bellied up to an oxygen bar and willingly strapped on the sort of plastic facial tubing that looks so sad in a nursing home but passed for hip in the Preakness infield.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | August 1, 1991
Three distinguished painters associated with Baltimore for many years are Grace Hartigan, Eugene Leake and the late Keith Martin. Their work can be seen in the latest exhibit (through Sept. 30) at the C. Grimaldis Gallery on Morton Street, the title of which describes their impact: They put "Maryland on the Map."They are painters whose works and origins are somewhat different -- Hartigan comes out of abstract expressionism, Leake out of realist landscape and Martin out of surrealism -- but each artist has used the particular tradition independently.
NEWS
June 1, 2002
COULD REALITY TV get any more absurd than the menu already dished up by television executives: make-believe safaris, a search for the perfect wife, bedding down with a bunch of rats, the furry kind? The answer, sadly, is yes. Here's the latest prime-time chatter from Hollywood: The featured performers in the next wave of reality TV programming won't be wanna-bes like Survivor's Richard Hatch, Big Brother's Will Kirby or Temptation Island's Billy Cleary and Mandy Lauderdale, but real-life stars who wanna-have their own reality TV shows.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER | April 2, 2008
On Palm Sunday, the second day of rioting, Jewell Chambers drove through West Baltimore looking for smoke. The 25-year-old had worked as a reporter for The Afro-American for just a few months. Her assignment on this day was to document the fires and looting that raged in the city. She pulled over near the intersection of Thomas Avenue and Baker Street and walked into a ransacked grocery store, her feet crunching over crackers and cereal that had been scattered across the floor. Inside the store was one other person - an elderly woman gathering groceries amid the shattered glass and broken shelves.
TRAVEL
By Toni Salama and Toni Salama,Chicago Tribune | March 16, 2008
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- There was a haze in the air. Almost as heavy as fog, it was drawn forth by a heat that sapped the very strength of the sea itself. I got out of the tourmaline green water and stood on the sand feeling breathless. It was broad daylight, and as I fixed my gaze, I saw ghosts in the distance, the outline of buildings, buildings, buildings. And among them construction cranes, one-armed wizards there to bid them grow, to multiply. I had been swimming just down the beach from the Burj Al Arab, the sail-shaped hotel, tallest in the world.
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