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hippodromehatter@aol.com | September 27, 2012
In the garden with Mr. Bee, Lou Boulmetis: Storing the harvest Much of our surplus garden produce is given away to family and friends. But plenty is also stored for meals that will be prepared during the upcoming winter — because I really don't want to wait until next summer to savor the flavor of my favorite varieties. Fortunately, many fruits and vegetables can be kept reasonably fresh for months, without going to the trouble of canning or drying. At our place, for instance, onions and garlic have been in storage for two months, and they will still be edible nine months from now. Other types of produce can easily be stored, too, providing that certain guidelines are adhered to. What follows should help.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Like the sound of a Greek Revival mansion with an "amazing view"? Want to own a "piece of Baltimore history"? Willing to look beyond a "scarred exterior"? Baltimore Housing has launched a marketing campaign for a select group of so-called "eclectic" properties owned by the city, in an effort to highlight the value hidden in the sea of roughly 1,000 vacant buildings it has listed for sale. The 18 sites, drawn from across the city, include the 1838 Upton Mansion, two former schools, two firehouses, a brick warehouse, and a one-time library, as well as some vacant lots open for new construction and several blocks of rowhouses traditionally associated with the Vacants to Value program.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | June 12, 2007
As if plucking money from thin air to help smooth an already silky budget debate, Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon found $4.7 million for new programs yesterday just hours before passage of the city's $2.65 billion budget. The additional money, which will come in part from a budget surplus that is now expected to be larger than forecast four weeks ago, includes $383,000 for mental health programs, $412,000 more for after-school initiatives and $790,000 for pools. At a meeting before the City Council's vote to approve the budget, Dixon and City Councilman Bernard C. "Jack" Young, chairman of the council's budget committee, read aloud items that would receive the newfound cash.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Michael H. Weinman, a retired real estate developer who was a co-manager of the family-owned Morris Weinman Co., died Sunday of heart failure at his Worthington Valley home. He was 78. Michael Henry Weinman was born and raised in Baltimore and was a 1953 graduate of St. Paul's School. In 1957, he earned a bachelor's degree in business from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He served in the Army for a year at Fort Knox, Ky., before going to work in 1958 for Sunny's Surplus, which was a family-owned retail business.
NEWS
December 23, 1990
Former County Executive Habern W. Freeman made a presentation before the County Council Dec. 11 during which he contended that County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann has been incorrect in her portrayal of the the county budget and the use of budget surplus money. The text of Mr. Freeman's presentation follows:During the past week we have been presented with a deluge of false information and a fabrication on the subject of "surplus."County charter section 506:(1) A statement of all revenue estimated to be received by the county during the ensuing year.
NEWS
August 29, 1994
The receipts have been tallied and the bills have been paid, and it looks like Annapolis finished the 1994 fiscal year with money to spare.According to figures City Administrator Michael Mallinoff released yesterday, the city ended the fiscal year on June 30 with a surplus of $1.66 million.The city had a general fund surplus of $2.07 million and a loss of $411,000 in its enterprise funds that include water, sewer, parking and transportation funds. Most of the deficit came from the transportation fund, which ended the year $895,000 in the red.Mr.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 6, 2005
An influential Baltimore citizens group is asking city officials to use more of the city's budget surplus to promote after-school programs for children. The group, Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development (BUILD), is lobbying for $5.9 million of the surplus to be earmarked for in-school programs and community-based youth programs. So far, city leaders have said they will set aside $3.4 million for in-school programs. Mayor Martin O'Malley has said a large portion of the $59 million surplus needs to be used to cover overspending by some city agencies.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | September 16, 1992
The bean counters have counted, and Baltimore County officials have a pleasant surprise -- a $4.9 million budget surplus for the fiscal year that ended June 30.But Hayden administration officials say the money won't come close to covering the $20 million to $30 million the county expects to lose this year when the state cuts aid to local governments in an effort to deal with its own budget deficit.County Executive Roger B. Hayden said that he is preparing to reduce the size of county government still further and will look at all county programs and services.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1994
Maryland ended its budget year with a modest surplus, the state comptroller announced yesterday.The state closed the books on the 1994 fiscal year, which ended June 30, with an extra $60 million, Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein said.Mr. Goldstein put the current surplus in context when he said it's enough money to keep state government running for less than two days.Still, it's the largest surplus since 1988, a few years before the recession took its full toll on the state's budget and economy.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
Call it a fluke. Call it a miracle.The city of Annapolis is calling it a $732,000 surplus, one of the largest in the city's history."It is unusual to have one of this size," said Alderman John R. Hammond, R-Ward 1 and chairman of the Finance Committee. "I don't know if this [surplus] is the largest we've ever had. But this is unusual."While other jurisdictions are fighting to balance their budgets with less and less help from the state and federal governments, Annapolis finds itself in the unlikely position of having ended fiscal year 1992 on June 30 with a substantial surplus.
NEWS
By Kym Byrnes | April 17, 2014
As the county budget process gets underway, three Carroll County commissioners have put two plans on the table to spend $12.9 million FY2014 in budget surplus. In a Town Hall meeting on Tuesday, Carroll County commissioners Doug Howard and Haven Shoemaker proposed a plan to spend the surplus on education, nonprofits and IT upgrades, among other things. "I think [this plan] will actually allow us to move forward in strengthening some of the areas that have been struggling for the past couple years," Howard said.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
A outdated state-owned pier along an industrial stretch of Canton waterfront is one step closer to landing on the open market. The Maryland Board of Public Works approved a request by the Maryland Port Administration on Wednesday to declare the pier and its water access rights as surplus to the state's needs, the first step toward selling the property. The 346,000-square-foot Clinton Street Marine Terminal pier and the narrow half-acre piece of land it attaches to along South Clinton Street in the Canton Industrial Area are valued between $2.5 million and $3.1 million.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
The Maryland Port Administration is urging state officials to approve its sale of a 346,0000-square-foot pier in the Canton Industrial Area. The Clinton Street Marine Terminal, which has seen little use for decades, sits across the Inner Harbor from Fort McHenry in the 1800 and 1900 blocks of S. Clinton Street, and has an appraised value between $2.5 million and $3.1 million, according to remarks on the intended sale before the Board of Public Works....
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
Unexpected expenses and shortfalls - $3.8 million in police expenses, $4 million in unpaid tax credits, a $14.4 million gap from inactive speed cameras - left Baltimore officials scrambling in recent months to patch holes in the budget, the city's fiscal chief said Tuesday. Budget Director Andrew Kleine detailed the fixes in the $2.4 billion spending plan at a quarterly briefing before City Council members. He said he now expects a $4.5 million surplus by the end of the fiscal year in June.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2013
Two years after the Obama administration relaunched an effort to get rid of surplus federal buildings, almost all of the excess property identified in Maryland remains in government hands, a review by The Baltimore Sun has found. Red tape, lack of congressional action and inadequate funding have left federal agencies stuck with at least 200 vacant or underutilized properties in the state, from closet-size storage sheds in Beltsville to an eight-story, historic office building a block from Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
When first-year Superintendent Renee Foose presented her first operating budget for Howard County public schools, she lauded the proposal as being just a $7 million increase over last year's budget and said it meets the primary objective of protecting the classroom with no furloughs or decreases to staff. The $721.1 million plan also addresses such concerns as a new elementary school, accommodating 550 new students throughout the system and implementing several program enhancements.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | November 1, 2005
Baltimore County finished the fiscal year that ended June 30 with a $237 million surplus, $20 million more than forecast, thanks to higher-than-expected income tax revenue and a booming real estate market, the county auditor reported yesterday. About $68 million of the surplus will be locked in a "rainy-day" fund set aside for emergencies. Donald I. Mohler, a spokesman for County Executive James T. Smith Jr., said yesterday that the remaining money would likely be used for one-time expenses such as school construction, adding that a cut in the property tax rate would be risky.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | October 13, 1990
Howard County, accustomed to starting each new budget with the discovery of a healthy, unanticipated surplus, finds the cupboard bare as it starts making spending plans for next year, Budget Officer Raymond S. Wacks said yesterday.Mr. Wacks said estimates showed the government finished the fiscal year that ended June 30 with no unanticipated surplus -- something that hasn't happened in Howard County since the recession of the mid-1970s.That means the county will start drafting a budget for the upcoming fiscal year, which begins next July 1, with no money left over.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
Along the brick streets of Annapolis' historic downtown this week, public works employee Kevin Brown deployed the newest weapon in the city's arsenal. Steam arose from beneath the brass bristles of Brown's contraption as it pulverized the dark, sticky smears flecking the sidewalk at the corner of Main and Francis streets. Now that Annapolis has emerged from a budget crisis, Mayor Joshua Cohen said, he has focused attention on beautification efforts, including a new website for reporting problems with city service and a $17,000 investment in a "gum buster" that Brown used to eradicate chewing gum from bricks in the historic district.
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hippodromehatter@aol.com | September 27, 2012
In the garden with Mr. Bee, Lou Boulmetis: Storing the harvest Much of our surplus garden produce is given away to family and friends. But plenty is also stored for meals that will be prepared during the upcoming winter — because I really don't want to wait until next summer to savor the flavor of my favorite varieties. Fortunately, many fruits and vegetables can be kept reasonably fresh for months, without going to the trouble of canning or drying. At our place, for instance, onions and garlic have been in storage for two months, and they will still be edible nine months from now. Other types of produce can easily be stored, too, providing that certain guidelines are adhered to. What follows should help.
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