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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | December 5, 2012
Sinai Hospital of Baltimore has opened a surgery center targeting the elderly population. The Sinai Center for Geriatric Surgery is led by Dr. Mark R. Katlic, chief of Surgery at Sinai Hospital and author of several books and numerous peer-reviewed journal articles on geriatric surgery. “The conditions that often require surgery - cancer, atherosclerosis, degenerative joint disease, cataracts, prostate disease and gallstones - increase in incidence with increasing age," Katlic, said in a statement.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Maryland health officials may ask state lawmakers for permission to oversee plastic surgery centers, a move inspired in part by the death of a Lochearn woman after liposuction. The state health department had already been considering whether to ask for a change to the legal definition of free-standing surgery centers to align regulations with medical risk instead of insurance billing practices, Secretary Joshua Sharfstein said. Surgical centers currently are subject to state inspection only if they meet certain criteria in how they bill insurance companies, he said.
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NEWS
By From Staff Reports | July 6, 1994
Carroll County General Hospital settled yesterday on the purchase of the county Health Department building at 540 Washington Road for $4.5 million.The hospital plans to put a $5.2 million freestanding surgery center on the building's first floor and to house outpatient and diagnostic treatment services on the second floor. Hospital officials say the building's 149 parking spaces will ease a parking shortage at Carroll County General.Health Department employees are expected to vacate the building in June and construction on the new surgery center will begin shortly thereafter, said hospital spokeswoman Gill Chamblin.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
A bill to give health regulators more oversight of facilities like the now-closed Monarch Medspa in Timonium is making a late surge in the General Assembly after weeks of discussions among state and industry officials. The House of Delegates unanimously passed the legislation Monday afternoon. It needs to clear the Senate, including an extra procedural step, within the next week. The legislative session draws to a close April 8. If passed, the law would close a regulatory gap that does not allow state health officials to proactively inspect and oversee plastic surgery centers.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | June 19, 1994
At the Central Maryland Surgery Center in South Baltimore recently, a nurse prepared Mildred Bonadio for cataract surgery by dropping a local anesthetic into her eye.Normally, the patient would be asleep and a physician would have injected the drug with a needle. But the drops, introduced this spring at the center, saved 10 minutes on Mrs. Bonadio's procedure and the others that followed. By 2 p.m., the operating room was running ahead 1 1/2 hours -- enough time to schedule four more patients.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | April 14, 1993
St. Agnes Hospital buys surgery centerELLICOTT CITY -- St. Agnes Hospital has purchased a Columbia Medical Plan outpatient-surgery center in Ellicott City, its first major expansion outside of Baltimore City in more than 100 years.The Baltimore City hospital bought the Patuxent Surgicare Center at 2850 North Ridge Road on Monday to better serve patients in Howard and Baltimore counties. About 2,000 Howard County residents visited the hospital in 1991, hospital officials said.The hospital will use the first floor of the three-story building to perform outpatient surgery ranging from podiatry to plastic surgery.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | April 14, 1993
St. Agnes Hospital has purchased a Columbia Medical Plan outpatient surgery center in Ellicott City, its first major expansion outside of Baltimore City in more than 100 years.The Baltimore City hospital said it bought the Patuxent Surgicare Center at 2850 North Ridge Road on Monday to better serve patients in Howard and Baltimore counties."We felt we needed a facility close to them," hospital spokesman George J. Moniodis said. About 2,000 Howard County residents visited the hospital in 1991, hospital officials said.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | September 4, 1991
New facilities and corporate offers, fund raising and a memorial honoring the late Atlee Wampler topped the agenda at last night's quarterly meeting of the Board of Carroll County Health Services Inc.Carroll County Health Services is the parent company of Carroll County General Hospital, Carroll County Med-Services Inc. and Carroll CountyGeneral Hospital Foundation. Its subsidiaries report on their business operations at the quarterly meetings.Kevin Kelbly, vice president for finance and the hospital's chieffinancial officer, said that Carroll County Health Services and its subsidiaries generated $34.4 million in operating and non-operating revenue for fiscal 1991, which ended June 30.That compares to $28.4 million in revenue for fiscal 1990.
NEWS
November 30, 2007
$1.35 million OK'd to replace ice rink The state Board of Public Works has approved $1.35 million to help replace the ice rink at Quiet Waters Park just outside Annapolis, putting it on track to reopen this time next year. The money awarded Wednesday from Program Open Space funds covers two-thirds of the cost of the much-anticipated $2 million project to reopen the popular rink. Anne Arundel County, anticipating the state funding, set aside the remaining money in its budget for this year, with County Executive John R. Leopold saying it was prudent to pay for the repairs sooner rather than later, as the costs will increase over time.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1994
Hospital chain buys surgery centerColumbia/HCA Healthcare Corp. yesterday agreed to buy surgery center operator Medical Care America Inc. for approximately $1.1 billion in stock and assumed debt, in another step in the rapid consolidation of the medical care industry.The proposed merger expands the reach of Louisville, Ky.-based Columbia/HCA, already the nation's biggest hospital chain, by adding 96 outpatient centers.Medical Care America shareholders will receive Columbia/HCA shares worth approximately $30 for each Medical Care share, according to a formula based on the value of Columbia's share price.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | December 5, 2012
Sinai Hospital of Baltimore has opened a surgery center targeting the elderly population. The Sinai Center for Geriatric Surgery is led by Dr. Mark R. Katlic, chief of Surgery at Sinai Hospital and author of several books and numerous peer-reviewed journal articles on geriatric surgery. “The conditions that often require surgery - cancer, atherosclerosis, degenerative joint disease, cataracts, prostate disease and gallstones - increase in incidence with increasing age," Katlic, said in a statement.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
A 59-year-old Lochearn woman died Monday of a rare infection after liposuction surgery, and two other patients have also contracted infections, prompting health officials Wednesday to shut down the Timonium cosmetic surgery center where each was treated. Monarch Medspa officials are cooperating as Maryland and Baltimore County health officials investigate the source of the infections, which involve the same bacteria that causes strep throat. But the bacteria can be significantly more dangerous when infecting other parts of the body, sometimes causing shock, organ failure and even death.
NEWS
November 30, 2007
$1.35 million OK'd to replace ice rink The state Board of Public Works has approved $1.35 million to help replace the ice rink at Quiet Waters Park just outside Annapolis, putting it on track to reopen this time next year. The money awarded Wednesday from Program Open Space funds covers two-thirds of the cost of the much-anticipated $2 million project to reopen the popular rink. Anne Arundel County, anticipating the state funding, set aside the remaining money in its budget for this year, with County Executive John R. Leopold saying it was prudent to pay for the repairs sooner rather than later, as the costs will increase over time.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
ANAHEIM, Calif. - Orioles center fielder Luis Matos underwent successful surgery yesterday at Johns Hopkins Hospital to insert a rod in his fractured right shin. He was allowed to return home last night and will be on crutches for about 10 days. The surgery was performed by Dr. Andrew Cosgarea, an orthopedic specialist. Matos was "in recovery and doing fine," said Orioles head trainer Richie Bancells. "He'll basically have to stay off [his leg] for about two weeks and then he'll go home to Puerto Rico if everything goes well.
NEWS
April 12, 1998
IT IS a classic battle between the haves and the have-nots. Only in this case, the have-nots are intent on destroying Maryland's successful health-cost regulatory system to enrich individual hospitals.A handful of hospitals has engaged some of Maryland's most expensive lobbyists to strong-arm legislators into giving them permission to establish expensive open-heart surgery centers -- despite state regulators' objections.Just such a provision has been attached to a bill in Annapolis aimed at restructuring the way Maryland regulates hospital and health-care costs.
NEWS
April 5, 1995
More than most states, Maryland has been successful in containing the ever-rising costs of hospital care. Through a system of sharing the burden of paying for indigent care -- and paying for the essential and expensive role of teaching hospitals -- Marylanders as a group have avoided the skyrocketing costs that have plagued other states.But the uncontrolled growth of free-standing, unlicensed surgery clinics poses a danger. While these centers provide lower costs and greater convenience and comfort for many patients, they draw business away from hospitals -- especially patients with health insurance coverage.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1994
In 1992, Union Memorial Hospital fought competitors and a legal challenge to win the right to an open-heart surgery center. This month, as the center opens, it faces another kind of battle -- that for customers in a declining market for cardiovascular services.The $1.5 million center, expected to serve as many as 500 patients a year at full capacity, is the fifth in the Baltimore area and opens as hospitals are performing fewer and fewer surgeries of all kinds.But managers at Union Memorial say that despite the changes in the health care marketplace since they applied to state regulators for the high-tech service in 1990, the hospital is well-positioned to compete.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | October 27, 1991
Joan Bildstein has seen many changes in her 20 years as a nurse at Carroll County General Hospital, but one thing has been constant."I must say that from the moment I walked in the door at Carroll County General Hospital, it felt like home, and after all these years, it still does," she said.Bildstein, 54, works in the Ambulatory Surgery Center. She becameinterested in CCGH when her family was preparing to move to Glyndon,Baltimore County."When we were getting ready to move into the house, I was debating about where I should work.
BUSINESS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Sun Staff Writer | April 2, 1995
Rather than go to a big hospital to have a cataract operation, Ian Gordon chooses the small St. Agnes Surgery Center.It's more convenient -- tucked away in a quiet neighborhood in Ellicott City 10 minutes from his home.And the center is less daunting than a hospital. A compact, three-story brick building, its automatic sliding glass doors open into what looks like a large doctor's office with upholstered chairs, magazines, a TV, piped-in music and coffee for patients' families.Arriving about 6:30 a.m. on a freezing February morning, Mr. Gordon, a sandy-haired native of Scotland, is soon stretched out in one of four operating rooms.
BUSINESS
By a Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1995
The state Senate and House of Delegates are approaching agreement on legislation governing the more than 80 outpatient surgery centers that have sprung up in Maryland in competition with hospitals.The Senate Finance Committee narrowly approved yesterday a bill that establishes licensing criteria for these centers. But on a 6-to-5 vote the committee rejected controversial proposals to require surgery centers to pay for charity care and graduate medical education.The committee's bill, which now moves to the full Senate, is in line with legislation favored by a House panel.
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