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NEWS
September 14, 1993
As the daughter of sharecroppers, Dr. Joycelyn Elders never expected successes to come easily in life. Even so, the delay of nine months between President Clinton's announcement of his intention to appoint her the nation's next surgeon general and her confirmation by the Senate last week was a difficult wait for a woman as focused and forceful as Dr. Elders.Her willingness to ruffle feathers by blunt talk about social and sexual realities guaranteed that hers would be a high-profile appointment, and that her confirmation would be a lightning rod for those who see partisan politics as the major front in a broad-based cultural conflict.
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NEWS
March 23, 2014
Thank you for your editorial describing Dr. Vivek Murthy's qualifications to serve as our nation's next surgeon general. Moreover, thank you for chastising the National Rifle Association's irrational, unfounded attacks on Dr. Murthy ( "Another NRA victim," March 20). Let me offer a few facts and my firsthand observations of Dr. Murthy's skills and abilities. As your editorial notes, he truly is accomplished in several key aspects of delivering health care directly to patients, teaching medical students, conducting research and setting up innovative private sector information systems for doctors.
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NEWS
July 16, 1993
Dr. Joycelyn Elders, who is President Clinton's nominee for surgeon general of the United States, faces confirmation hearings before the Senate Labor Committee today that deserve to be fiercely controversial -- and educational. We support Dr. Elders without reservation, not least because she dares to shock the American public and enrage the religious right with blunt commentary on how this country should confront the searing problem of unwanted, unplanned teen-age pregnancies.She favors health education in schools that would alert adolescents of the perils they face before it is too late.
NEWS
March 19, 2014
Learning more about the causes of injury and death and recommending policies that might lengthen people's lives has long been the mission of the public health community. Under those circumstances, it's hardly surprising that those in the field are concerned not only about viruses and infectious agents but also about firearm-related injuries and deaths. For years, doctors have been looking at gun violence, the nature of the injuries it causes and the policies that might prevent it. This is strictly mainstream stuff.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 16, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The fight over the nomination of Dr. Henry W. Foster Jr. as surgeon general has become nearly as tortured and politicized as recent struggles over Supreme Court or Cabinet nominees.Heated congressional debate, war-room strategy-making, TV appearances -- all over a public health position that has little explicit responsibility, no policy involvement, a tiny budget and staff, and an oddly anachronistic military uniform.But the furor over the position of surgeon general, once a post of great administrative prominence and force, in many ways reflects the revamping of the 124-year-old job into a potentially powerful bully pulpit.
NEWS
By ALFRED SOMMER | August 8, 1993
The debate over confirmation of Dr. Joycelyn Elders as surgeongeneral speaks volumes about the evolution of that office and its position in the contemporary health establishment. Only in recent times, shorn of most of its original administrative functions, has the office emerged as "First Doctor" to the nation and vocal advocate for health reform.The surgeon general, usually a three-star commissioned officer in the U.S. Public Health Service, is the lineal descendant of the "Supervising Surgeon" of the "Marine Hospital Service."
NEWS
By Michael Tanner | June 19, 2007
It's apparently time for another pointless debate over who should be surgeon general of the United States. In 1993, President Bill Clinton appointed M. Joycelyn Elders, who famously called for schools to teach young people how to masturbate. Now President Bush has tapped James W. Holsinger Jr., a surgeon and cardiologist from Kentucky, for the position. Dr. Holsinger evidently has some antediluvian views on homosexuality, which makes his fitness for office questionable, to say the least, and the usual suspects are preparing to do battle whether or not he should be confirmed.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | July 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Amid right-wing attacks that Surgeon General nominee M. Joycelyn Elders is a radical, anti-family "Condom Queen," the White House and numerous health groups have mounted a full court press, hoping to head off the kind of opposition that derailed the controversial Lani Guinier nomination last month.Dr. Elders, the outspoken Arkansas health chief who has championed school-based health clinics, availability of contraceptives in schools, sex education beginning in kindergarten and abortion rights, is scheduled to go before the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee for her confirmation hearing Friday.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | December 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Setting off a firestorm that the administration immediately tried to extinguish, Surgeon General M. Joycelyn Elders said yesterday that she believes the legalization of drugs would dramatically reduce the nation's soaring crime rate.Speaking about violence as a public health issue at a National Press Club luncheon, Dr. Elders noted that the majority of violent crimes involve alcohol or drug use and asserted that othernations have legalized drugs with positive results."I do feel we'd markedly reduce our crime rate if drugs were legalized," she said in response to a question.
FEATURES
By Frederic M. Biddle and Frederic M. Biddle,Boston Globe | March 10, 1992
Old Joe Camel, the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. "smooth character," should hit the desert trail because his message is too seductive to children, the surgeon general and the American Medical Association said yesterday.Surgeon General Antonia Novello's invitation to cramp the style of Old Joe, who shoots pool, plays Las Vegas and woos women with a Camel in his snout, raised the stakes of a public relations battle over the marketing of tobacco and alcohol products. Ms. Novello's status as surgeon general -- and her notification yesterday of the Federal Trade Commission of her concern -- also raised a First Amendment issue.
NEWS
January 27, 2014
It's been half a century since the first U.S. surgeon general's report appeared linking smoking to lung cancer. In the decades that followed, federal and state health officials waged a vigorous public information and education campaign that convinced millions of Americans to kick the habit. But as a new surgeon general's report this month warned, smoking remains the leading cause of preventable deaths in the U.S., and its health consequences for individuals are even more lethal than previously believed.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | February 10, 2011
Washington's best-known chain smoker is Speaker of the House John Boehner. Its best-known sneak smoker is President Barack Obama. Mr. Boehner is tired of being queried about his habit, saying to Chris Wallace of Fox News, "Why is this a topic? Leave me alone. " The White House, on the other hand, has been adhering to a policy of trying to keep the presidential puffing from being a topic by ignoring questions about it. However, on Tuesday, First Lady Michelle Obama ignited more talk about her husband's reputed five-cigarette-a-day habit by saying he has stopped smoking.
NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Noam N. Levey,Tribune Newspapers | May 23, 2009
WASHINGTON - -In a historic shift in public health policy almost half a century after the U.S. surgeon general first warned of the lethal dangers of smoking, Congress is poised to give the federal government sweeping new authority to regulate the manufacturing of cigarettes and other tobacco products. The legislation, long resisted by the tobacco industry, could allow consumers to see for the first time what chemicals and other additives tobacco companies put in their products. It would empower the Food and Drug Administration to put new limits on harmful ingredients and prohibit tobacco companies from marketing "light" cigarettes.
NEWS
By Tribune Washington Bureau | January 7, 2009
President-elect Barack Obama has asked Dr. Sanjay Gupta to be the next surgeon general, looking to a popular television personality to help provide a public face for his health care agenda. A health and medicine correspondent for CNN and CBS, Gupta, 39, is also a practicing neurosurgeon in Atlanta and a member of the faculty of the Emory University School of Medicine. The surgeon general oversees some 6,000 officers in the commissioned corps of the Public Health Service. Gupta would bring to the post an unparalleled background as a communicator, having won widespread public recognition and a number of journalistic awards in recent years.
NEWS
August 2, 2008
JULIUS RICHMOND, 91 Former U.S. surgeon general Dr. Julius Richmond, the U.S. surgeon general in the Carter administration who issued a report labeling cigarette smoking "slow-motion suicide," has died. Dr. Richmond, who was the first director of Head Start, died Sunday at his Boston-area home, said a spokeswoman for Harvard University, where Dr. Richmond was professor emeritus. In 1979, Dr. Richmond presented his Surgeon's General's Report on smoking, a follow-up to the 1964 report by an earlier surgeon general that led to warnings on cigarette packs.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun Reporter | January 31, 2008
When it comes to health and fitness, the magic pill may not be a pill at all. It may be something much harder to swallow. Many U.S. health professionals are adopting the decades-old directive of a Japanese researcher who said adults need to go for a long walk - 10,000 steps - nearly every day of the week. Children and people aiming to lose weight need more steps, and seniors need fewer. Other factors, such as medical conditions, also complicate the generic one-size-fits-all approach. But it's tough to find someone in the health arena who doesn't think more walking would benefit a lot of hearts, bones, muscles and even psyches.
NEWS
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Reporter | December 16, 2007
The florid face, the heaving gut, that terrible wheezing he makes just getting out of the sleigh and landing with a thud on your roof like a pallet of cinder blocks. Let's not even get into blood pressure issues, cholesterol levels and body mass index. "A heart attack in a red flannel suit" - that's what they whisper at the doctor's office when he shows up for his annual physical. The question is this: Should Santa Claus be hitting the StairMaster? Is it time for the big guy to sign up for NutriSystem, join a gym, slim down, tone up and try to fit into those Dockers with the 36-inch waist again?
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 15, 2007
Richard Nixon was a crook. He was also a liar and anti-Semite who sought to subvert the Constitution. I wish he was president again. I'd also take Jimmy Carter, widely perceived as being about as effectual as Elmer Fudd, or Bill Clinton, fastest zipper in the West. Flawed men, yes, but say this much for them: When it came to a choice between people and party, between the public and the politics, there was at least a bare chance they would put the people, the public, first. No such chance exists with the current occupant of the mansion on Pennsylvania Avenue.
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