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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
Dr. Howard H. Patt, a former Baltimore surgeon and longtime Mount Washington resident, died April 25 at Sunrise of Santa Monica, a senior living community in California, of complications from a fall. He was 95. "Howard was always a very calm, relaxed and a conscientious surgeon," said Dr. Morton "Morty" Ellin, a retired Baltimore internist, and a friend and colleague of nearly 60 years. "He really felt honored to be a physician and appreciated being one. It just wasn't about making money," he said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2014
Dr. Donald A. Morrison, a retired orthopedic surgeon who had been a partner with Towson Orthopaedic Associates, died Oct. 6 of complications from dementia at Arden Courts of Towson. The longtime Lutherville resident was 82. The son of Allan A. Morrison, a mining engineer, and Ruth Stevens Morrison, a homemaker, Donald Allan Morrison was born in Spokane, Wash., and spent his early years in Helena, Mont. With the coming of World War II, his family returned to Spokane when his father was hired as an executive at Alcoa Aluminum Co. They later moved to Portland, Ore., where Dr. Morrison graduated in 1950 from Ulysses S. Grant High School.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Dr. Jerel Katz, who overcame a childhood bout with polio and went on to have a 40-year career as a general surgeon, died Aug. 5 of kidney failure at Riderwood Village, a Silver Spring senior living community. The former longtime Pikesville resident was 83. The son of a dermatologist and a homemaker, Jerel Katz was born and raised in Philadelphia. Dr. Katz was "a man unique in the extreme who lived a remarkable life - especially considering the physical obstacles thrown in his way, starting with polio - at an early age cause by a failed live-virus vaccination," said his son, Alan Katz, a screenwriter who lives in Los Angeles.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Some women at high risk for breast cancer because of an inherited gene mutation, including actress Angelina Jolie, are choosing to have preventive double mastectomies. Other women who have cancer in one breast are asking their doctors to remove the other breast removed out of caution. Whatever the reason, more women are having both breasts removed in response to cancer or a cancer threat. Dr. David Euhus, chief of breast surgery in the division of surgical oncology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, explains the trend and what happens after.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Dr. Daniel C.W. "D.C. " Finney, a retired Baltimore surgeon and World War II veteran, died Monday of heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Lutherville resident was 88. Dr. Daniel Clarke Wharton Finney — who was known as "D.C. " — was the son of Eben Dickey Finney, an architect, and Margaret Wharton Smith Finney, a homemaker. He was also a collateral descendant of Johns Hopkins and the namesake of Dr. D.C. Wharton Smith, a Baltimore pediatrician, who were both on his maternal side.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
A federal judge dismissed Thursday a harassment lawsuit against St. Joseph Medical Center and its parent company so the plaintiff, a cardiac surgeon, can amend the complaint, which alleges that the hospital is punishing him for refusing to comply with a kickback scheme and blowing the whistle on it. Lawyers for Dr. Peter Horneffer, who filed the lawsuit in February, said they plan to submit a revised document within two weeks, correcting an error...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
Dr. Abdul Ghaffar Qureshi, a retired surgeon who worked with the elderly residents of Baltimore's public high-rise apartments, died of complications of Alzheimer's disease May 6 at Quail Run Assisted Living in Perry Hall. He was 75 and had lived in Westminster and Linthicum. Born in a village in Pakistan, he was the son of Ghulam Haider, a school headmaster, and his wife, Ameer, a homemaker. He received a scholarship to study medicine at Nishtar Medical College in Multan, Punjab, Pakistan.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
The Johns Hopkins doctor who was shot on the job in the hospital Thursday by a patient's son is a well-liked and well-respected surgeon - who is known for entertaining his colleagues by performing magic tricks - according to those who work with him. Police officials said the doctor was expected to survive a gunshot wound to the abdomen. Coworkers identified him as David B. Cohen, a 45-year-old orthopedic and spinal surgeon on Hopkins' staff for more than a dozen years. Hospital officials wouldn't confirm the doctor's name, citing privacy issues, and no one answered the phone or the door at his Cockeysville home or at his Hopkins office phone.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2011
Dr. William Lehman Guyton, a retired surgeon, World War II combat veteran and pre-eminent collector of American silhouettes, died May 23 of pneumonia at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. He was 96. The son of a physician and a homemaker, Dr. Guyton was born and raised in Baltimore. He was a 1931 graduate of City College and a 1934 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. He earned his medical degree in 1938 from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and completed his surgical internship and residency at the old Church Hospital in 1942, when he was commissioned in the Army.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
Dr. John Joseph Krejci, a retired general surgeon who helped plan St. Joseph Medical Center's move to Towson, died at that hospital Monday after suffering an aneurysm. He was 89 and lived in Stoneleigh. Born on Milton Avenue, he attended St. Michael the Archangel School. In 1936, in a citywide oratorical contest on communism, he won a half-scholarship to Loyola High School, from which he graduated in 1941. He also played varsity ice hockey and tennis. While at his Loyola High senior prom, he met his future wife, Madelyn V. Krespach.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Dr. James Ellicott Tyson Hopkins, a retired thoracic surgeon and decorated World War II veteran who drew on his battlefield experience to advocate for the use of body armor, died of heart failure Monday at his home near Bel Air. He was 99. He served during World War II with a fabled unit, Merrill's Marauders, behind enemy lines in Burma. Born on his family's farm near Highland in Howard County, he was a descendant of Johns Hopkins, the Quaker philanthropist who founded the Baltimore hospital and university.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Dr. Jay N. Karpa, a retired Baltimore surgeon who was also certified in chronic wound care, died Friday of prostate cancer at his Pikesville home. He was 79. "As a person, he was a true gentleman. He was kind and compassionate and treated his patients like they were his family," said Dr. Alan S. Davis, who is chairman of the department of surgery at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown. "And he was a superb surgeon and was always cool and calm in the OR. " The son of Isador Karpa, a pharmacist, and Dora Karpa, a homemaker, Jay Norman Karpa was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
Dr. Abdul Ghaffar Qureshi, a retired surgeon who worked with the elderly residents of Baltimore's public high-rise apartments, died of complications of Alzheimer's disease May 6 at Quail Run Assisted Living in Perry Hall. He was 75 and had lived in Westminster and Linthicum. Born in a village in Pakistan, he was the son of Ghulam Haider, a school headmaster, and his wife, Ameer, a homemaker. He received a scholarship to study medicine at Nishtar Medical College in Multan, Punjab, Pakistan.
NEWS
March 23, 2014
Thank you for your editorial describing Dr. Vivek Murthy's qualifications to serve as our nation's next surgeon general. Moreover, thank you for chastising the National Rifle Association's irrational, unfounded attacks on Dr. Murthy ( "Another NRA victim," March 20). Let me offer a few facts and my firsthand observations of Dr. Murthy's skills and abilities. As your editorial notes, he truly is accomplished in several key aspects of delivering health care directly to patients, teaching medical students, conducting research and setting up innovative private sector information systems for doctors.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
Orioles manager Buck Showalter said the team received good news about Manny Machado and his follow-up appointment Thursday in Los Angeles. "Nothing's changed, but it's good news to hear somebody else say what our training staff is saying," Showalter said. ESPN.com quoted Machado's surgeon, Neal ElAttrache, as saying the third baseman's left knee is “tracking normally” and Machado can continue with his rehabilitation. There is still no timetable mentioned in the report as to when he can play in games.
NEWS
March 19, 2014
Learning more about the causes of injury and death and recommending policies that might lengthen people's lives has long been the mission of the public health community. Under those circumstances, it's hardly surprising that those in the field are concerned not only about viruses and infectious agents but also about firearm-related injuries and deaths. For years, doctors have been looking at gun violence, the nature of the injuries it causes and the policies that might prevent it. This is strictly mainstream stuff.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
For two busy surgeons, the home they have created offers a serene retreat at the end of the day. Troy Pittman's and Michael Somenek's sleek condo at the Ritz-Carlton Residences provides a chance to relax and renew mind, body and spirit. The couple achieved this level of comfort with a simple design style: a clever use of natural and artificial light along with neutral decor and a discriminating use of color. One of their first tasks after moving in was to place every light switch on a dimmer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
With signs in the hall saying “Carson 2016” and “Run Ben, Run,” Dr. Ben Carson doubled down on some of his most controversial statements in a speech Saturday at the Conservative Political Action Conference in National Harbor, Maryland. And he fired up the partisan audience with talk of "the media," "the left" and "PC police" trying to "shut" him up. Going on the attack early over what he labeled "political correctness" attacks on him, Carson drew cheers from the crowd when he said, “I hate PC, and I will continue to defy the PC police who have tried in many cases to shut me up.” Referring to a statement he made comparing same sex marriage to bestiality, Carson said, “I still believe marriage is between a man and woman.” The statement to which he referred Saturday was made in March on Fox News where Carson is now employed.
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