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BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie & Randy Johnson | October 19, 1997
WATER, water, where it shouldn't be, is a continuing problem for homeowners.A reader who's arranging some home improvements for an elderly friend in Harford County writes:"My friend gets her water from an indoor well. Each time it rains heavily rain water and soil sediment spill out of the pump room onto the main cellar floor. The plumber informs me that the well is in good condition and is made of concrete. However, it was probably not grouted or encased, as the house was built in the early 1950s before this was required.
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NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,[Sun Reporter] | March 4, 2007
Several surface water options, including proposed reservoirs at Union Mills and Gillis Falls, are featured prominently in the county's updated water and sewer master plan. After the county commissioners signed off on it last week, the plan now awaits approval from the state Department of the Environment. In addition to the reservoirs, the county has also agreed to possible intakes from streams: one for Mount Airy at Gillis Falls, and one for Westminster at Big Pipe Creek. "We can't just rely on groundwater," said County Planning Director Steven C. Horn.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
Maryland environmental officials will take surface water samples at Baltimore County's Parkton Landfill late next week in the first phase of a site investigation requested by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.Mike Sullivan, a spokesman for the state Department of the Environment, said the initial tests will sample surface water and sediments from streams on the 217-acre site. Leachate -- rainwater that has percolated through the buried refuse -- will also be sampled.Area residents have long suspected that toxic substances mixed with the household trash have moved into the ground water and threaten their wells.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Comet Tempel 1, little more than a fuzzy spot of light in astronomers' telescopes, has turned out to be a complex little world whose surface has the consistency of dry powder snow. Scientists poring over data sent back by NASA's Deep Impact last July told colleagues yesterday that the comet is also unexpectedly active, belching clouds of water vapor and carbon dioxide into space as often as once a week. A science team, led by University of Maryland professor Michael A'Hearn, has just begun to plumb the voluminous data sent back by the spacecraft and the 820-pound "impactor" it dropped into the path of the speeding comet on Independence Day. "There's more than enough to keep us busy until well after I retire," said A'hearn, 64, at the 207th meeting of the American Astronomic Society.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,[Sun Reporter] | March 4, 2007
Several surface water options, including proposed reservoirs at Union Mills and Gillis Falls, are featured prominently in the county's updated water and sewer master plan. After the county commissioners signed off on it last week, the plan now awaits approval from the state Department of the Environment. In addition to the reservoirs, the county has also agreed to possible intakes from streams: one for Mount Airy at Gillis Falls, and one for Westminster at Big Pipe Creek. "We can't just rely on groundwater," said County Planning Director Steven C. Horn.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2000
Dear Mr. Azrael: My neighbor several years ago filled in a low area on their property, changing the contour so that rainwater now drains onto my property. Much of the fill was being pushed past the property line. I dug a drainage ditch along my side of the property line to divert water back where it formerly drained. I did this to stop erosion of the bank between us, which was created 60 years ago by a previous owner, and was not a problem until [my neighbor] filled the low areas of their property.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2004
Dear Mr. Azrael: What are rules in general as to the directing of rain spout or sump pump water to my property from a house next door, even if their ground is slightly higher than mine? Dear Reader: The general rule is that the owner of the higher land has a right to have surface water flow naturally from the high ground over the land of the lower landowner. So, when falling rain and melting snow flow naturally from upper land to lower land, the owner of the lower land has no right to erect embankments that change the natural flow of the surface water.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2005
What are rules in general as to the directing of rainspout or sump-pump water to my property from a house next door, even if their ground is slightly higher than mine? It is a well-established legal rule that the owner of higher land has a right only to have surface water flow naturally from the high ground over the land of the lower property. So, when falling rain and melting snow flow naturally from upper land to lower land, the owner of the lower land has no right to erect embankments that change the natural flow of water.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | January 6, 1995
State engineers met with Manchester officials yesterday, urging them to decide on a plan for replacing more than half the town's water supply.The choices are to filter the spring water the town uses for 55 percent of its drinking water, or to build enough wells to replace it with ground water, which is less vulnerable to contamination from surface water. Most town and state officials prefer ground water.Manchester is ahead of some small towns in meeting the state's February 1996 deadline for adopting stricter state and federal clean water guidelines because it commissioned a professional water study more than a year ago, said Barry O'Brien, an engineer with the state Department of the Environment.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1995
The Maryland Department of the Environment has ruled out two possible sources of bacteria in the Union Bridge water supply, and the agency now plans to check a suspected sinkhole near the well on Locust Street.Treated water from the well is safe to drink, an MDE spokesman said when tests started in September. But the agency wants to know the source of bacteria in the untreated water.Dye tests showed no infiltration from the town's sewer system, which is "very good news," said John W. Grace, an MDE public health engineer.
NEWS
By SHERIDAN LYONS and SHERIDAN LYONS,SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2005
The Mount Airy Town Council has given a local builder its consent to begin designing a water supply from the South Branch of the Patapsco River - at his expense and in conjunction with a recent agreement by the town with the Maryland Department of the Environment on its water allocation. Rob Scranton, an owner of CVI Development Group LLC of Woodstock, said he had "no luck" drilling for groundwater for wells on 120 acres of the Doubs property that lies along the river on the Carroll County side, with 26 additional acres in Howard.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2005
What are rules in general as to the directing of rainspout or sump-pump water to my property from a house next door, even if their ground is slightly higher than mine? It is a well-established legal rule that the owner of higher land has a right only to have surface water flow naturally from the high ground over the land of the lower property. So, when falling rain and melting snow flow naturally from upper land to lower land, the owner of the lower land has no right to erect embankments that change the natural flow of water.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2004
Dear Mr. Azrael: What are rules in general as to the directing of rain spout or sump pump water to my property from a house next door, even if their ground is slightly higher than mine? Dear Reader: The general rule is that the owner of the higher land has a right to have surface water flow naturally from the high ground over the land of the lower landowner. So, when falling rain and melting snow flow naturally from upper land to lower land, the owner of the lower land has no right to erect embankments that change the natural flow of the surface water.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2003
Aberdeen Proving Ground is gearing up for a shoreline repair job in the Edgewood Area, where erosion at a former chemical weapons testing range has left mortar shells and other projectiles exposed along the Bush River. The D Field shore restoration is expected to begin in October and cost about $1.8 million, Army officials say. The 1 1/2 -year project will contain what is now a critical threat to the river, they say, because new munitions are exposed each year by the erosion. The field was used from about 1918 to the 1960s for live fire, surface-to-surface and air-to-surface testing, officials said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 2001
MIAMI - In a bid to head off drinking-water shortages, Florida is nearing approval of a disputed plan that would allow billions of gallons of untreated, partly contaminated water to be injected deep into the ground in what would serve as subterranean water banks. Aides to Gov. Jeb Bush say the approach, which would involve capturing rainwater before it flows to the sea, would save the state hundreds of millions of dollars in treatment costs, and that extensive precautions would be taken to avoid any danger to human health.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2000
Dear Mr. Azrael: My neighbor several years ago filled in a low area on their property, changing the contour so that rainwater now drains onto my property. Much of the fill was being pushed past the property line. I dug a drainage ditch along my side of the property line to divert water back where it formerly drained. I did this to stop erosion of the bank between us, which was created 60 years ago by a previous owner, and was not a problem until [my neighbor] filled the low areas of their property.
NEWS
By SHERIDAN LYONS and SHERIDAN LYONS,SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2005
The Mount Airy Town Council has given a local builder its consent to begin designing a water supply from the South Branch of the Patapsco River - at his expense and in conjunction with a recent agreement by the town with the Maryland Department of the Environment on its water allocation. Rob Scranton, an owner of CVI Development Group LLC of Woodstock, said he had "no luck" drilling for groundwater for wells on 120 acres of the Doubs property that lies along the river on the Carroll County side, with 26 additional acres in Howard.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1997
A $500,000 surface-water filtering system is due to be installed soon at three Westminster wells to meet state and federal requirements, city officials said.The installation of two filters at three city wells is in the engineering stage.Construction is planned this year, about a year behind a state deadline, said Thomas B. Beyard, the city's director of planning and public works."We estimate that we'll finish in the fall of 1997," he said. "No government has been able to meet [the deadline]
NEWS
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2000
The judges pick up the glasses, swish the liquid around ever so gently, then sniff. They hold the glasses up to the light, the better to ascertain clearness. Then they take sips. They judge the liquid on appearance, odor, flavor and aftertaste. Finally, after deliberation, a winner is chosen. The best of show goes to ... South Carroll. The best water, that is. If you're served by the county's Freedom District Water Treatment Plant, the water you're drinking is prize-winning stuff. So next time you go to your faucet for a long, cool drink of H2O, savor it slowly.
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