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Surface Area

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NEWS
November 18, 2005
The Earth has a surface area of 197 million square miles, 29 percent of which is land.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 29, 2012
Arctic ice spread to its largest footprint of the year March 18. It was smaller than normal, but not as small as a year earlier. The ice cap, defined as the total surface area of ocean that is at least 15 percent ice, reached 5.88 million square miles, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center . A year ago, the ice cover was the smallest since 1979, at 5.65 million square miles. It has averaged 6.12 million square miles since 1979. The peak was almost two weeks later than previous years, typically about March 6. Walt Meier, a research scientist at the center, isn't sure why that is but theorizes it's because the ice has more room to grow because of increased melting during the summer months.
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NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,Sun reporter | November 15, 2006
Hoping to reduce storm water runoff into Chesapeake Bay tributaries, Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer has proposed one of the state's toughest limits for impervious surfaces, such as parking lots and roofs, on redeveloped properties. Under the ordinance introduced at Monday's City Council meeting, those redeveloping property, with some exceptions, would be required to cut by 50 percent the amount of existing surface area that does not absorb or filter water. State law and city code now require a 20 percent reduction for redeveloped properties.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,Sun reporter | November 15, 2006
Hoping to reduce storm water runoff into Chesapeake Bay tributaries, Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer has proposed one of the state's toughest limits for impervious surfaces, such as parking lots and roofs, on redeveloped properties. Under the ordinance introduced at Monday's City Council meeting, those redeveloping property, with some exceptions, would be required to cut by 50 percent the amount of existing surface area that does not absorb or filter water. State law and city code now require a 20 percent reduction for redeveloped properties.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2002
In geometry class last week, freshmen at the Key School in Annapolis learned about surface area and volume by using oranges and mini-marshmallows. And then they ate them. They ate chocolate bars, too, but they weren't part of the lesson. As teacher Gail Kaplan explained, "I tell them they can bring in any candy they want. Otherwise, we won't have enough marshmallows." The students used toothpicks to connect the marshmallows and form complex geometric shapes with up to 10 sides. Then they peeled the oranges to measure the fruit's surface to independently figure out the relationship between surface area and radius.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2002
In geometry class last week, freshmen at the Key School in Annapolis learned about surface area and volume by using oranges and mini-marshmallows. And then they ate them. They ate chocolate bars, too, but they weren't part of the lesson. As teacher Gail Kaplan explained, "I tell them they can bring in any candy they want. Otherwise, we won't have enough marshmallows." The students used toothpicks to connect the marshmallows and form complex geometric shapes with up to 10 sides. Then they peeled the oranges to measure the fruit's surface to independently figure out the relationship between surface area and radius.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 29, 2012
Arctic ice spread to its largest footprint of the year March 18. It was smaller than normal, but not as small as a year earlier. The ice cap, defined as the total surface area of ocean that is at least 15 percent ice, reached 5.88 million square miles, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center . A year ago, the ice cover was the smallest since 1979, at 5.65 million square miles. It has averaged 6.12 million square miles since 1979. The peak was almost two weeks later than previous years, typically about March 6. Walt Meier, a research scientist at the center, isn't sure why that is but theorizes it's because the ice has more room to grow because of increased melting during the summer months.
NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | November 24, 2001
SEATTLE - It's an age-old question: If you have to go outside and you don't have an umbrella, will you stay drier walking or running? Science for more than a half-century has found ways to complicate the matter until two North Carolina researchers settled the question with a highly sophisticated experiment: One walked in the rain, the other ran, and then they weighed their clothes. More than logic The logical theory - run, spend less time in the rain, get less wet - would be true enough if rain landed only on the top of your head and shoulders.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1996
Fire can inflict terrible injuries on anyone, but no one is more vulnerable than a child.A house fire can generate air temperatures of 500 degrees Fahrenheit or more, hot enough to sear a victim's throat and make it swell shut. But it can be hard to tell when a child is suffocating from throat burns, said Dr. Julius Goepp, assistant director of the pediatric emergency department at Johns Hopkins Children's Center. "Children are very, very strong," said Dr. Goepp, who treated one of yesterday's victims in an East Baltimore rowhouse fire.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | February 5, 1995
It was one of the sadder days of my childhood, and it didn't have anything to do with unrequited love, a lost dog or an execrable report card.It was the day I lost all my marbles. (Comments of regular readers as to the permanence of that loss are duly noted, but I mean literally and not figuratively.)I lost them all fair and square, in a series of bare-knuckle contests in the dusty ring of the school playground. The agates and the solid-colored mibs, a couple of cat's eyes and even a pair of "shooters" that were a bit larger than the rest.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,[Sun Reporter] | November 4, 2006
Navy@Duke Today, 1 p.m, 1090 AM, 1430 AM Line: Navy by 11 1/2
NEWS
November 18, 2005
The Earth has a surface area of 197 million square miles, 29 percent of which is land.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2002
In geometry class last week, freshmen at the Key School in Annapolis learned about surface area and volume by using oranges and mini-marshmallows. And then they ate them. They ate chocolate bars, too, but they weren't part of the lesson. As teacher Gail Kaplan explained, "I tell them they can bring in any candy they want. Otherwise, we won't have enough marshmallows." The students used toothpicks to connect the marshmallows and form complex geometric shapes with up to 10 sides. Then they peeled the oranges to measure the fruit's surface to independently figure out the relationship between surface area and radius.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2002
In geometry class last week, freshmen at the Key School in Annapolis learned about surface area and volume by using oranges and mini-marshmallows. And then they ate them. They ate chocolate bars, too, but they weren't part of the lesson. As teacher Gail Kaplan explained, "I tell them they can bring in any candy they want. Otherwise, we won't have enough marshmallows." The students used toothpicks to connect the marshmallows and form complex geometric shapes with up to 10 sides. Then they peeled the oranges to measure the fruit's surface to independently figure out the relationship between surface area and radius.
NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | November 24, 2001
SEATTLE - It's an age-old question: If you have to go outside and you don't have an umbrella, will you stay drier walking or running? Science for more than a half-century has found ways to complicate the matter until two North Carolina researchers settled the question with a highly sophisticated experiment: One walked in the rain, the other ran, and then they weighed their clothes. More than logic The logical theory - run, spend less time in the rain, get less wet - would be true enough if rain landed only on the top of your head and shoulders.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1996
Fire can inflict terrible injuries on anyone, but no one is more vulnerable than a child.A house fire can generate air temperatures of 500 degrees Fahrenheit or more, hot enough to sear a victim's throat and make it swell shut. But it can be hard to tell when a child is suffocating from throat burns, said Dr. Julius Goepp, assistant director of the pediatric emergency department at Johns Hopkins Children's Center. "Children are very, very strong," said Dr. Goepp, who treated one of yesterday's victims in an East Baltimore rowhouse fire.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,[Sun Reporter] | November 4, 2006
Navy@Duke Today, 1 p.m, 1090 AM, 1430 AM Line: Navy by 11 1/2
BUSINESS
By Adele Evans and Adele Evans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 1999
The house is so peaceful that Michael and Susan Mullendore had to install microphones to hear the outside brook trickling through the yard."It's wonderfully quiet; still and quiet," Susan said of her Ellicott City home.Indeed, the strength of the Mullendore home fosters a comforting inner silence. Why? Well, the answer is fairly concrete.The Mullendore home is made of a concrete-polystyrene combination, or ICF, for "insulated concrete form." The Mullendores chose it because of its anticipated energy savings, quality and strength.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | February 5, 1995
It was one of the sadder days of my childhood, and it didn't have anything to do with unrequited love, a lost dog or an execrable report card.It was the day I lost all my marbles. (Comments of regular readers as to the permanence of that loss are duly noted, but I mean literally and not figuratively.)I lost them all fair and square, in a series of bare-knuckle contests in the dusty ring of the school playground. The agates and the solid-colored mibs, a couple of cat's eyes and even a pair of "shooters" that were a bit larger than the rest.
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