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By LONNY WEAVER | October 3, 1993
In a couple of weeks I hope to join a group of pals for an annual surf-fishing trip to Assateague Island.Beginning now and continuing through mid to late November is sort of a heaven on beach for Atlantic surfcasters. If you want to really touch nature's elements, nothing quite tops a deserted fall beach with a long, powerful fishing rod battling a big bluefish or striped bass (rockfish) in a cold, heavy surf.I'm just now getting back into surf fishing. In the early '70s I did quite a bit during the summer in the Cape May, N.J., area.
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NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | January 28, 2008
Stanley F. Dabkowski, the retired owner of a printers ink supply business, died of heart failure Wednesday at his Parkville home. He was 83. Known as "Dabby" or "the Ink Man," Mr. Dabkowski was born and raised in East Baltimore before moving to Baltimore County as an adult. His son Paul Dabkowski of Lutherville said Mr. Dabkowski left Patterson High School in 11th grade to help support his mother and family. Mr. Dabkowski served in the Army during World War II and was stationed on the Panamanian island of Taboga.
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NEWS
By Sue Hayes | July 28, 1991
Anglers searching for fish last week were just as anxiously seeking a cool breeze. Hot, muggy weather, with temperatures climbing close to 100 degrees, kept many anglers off the water during the day.Toward evening, anglers looked for relief on the beaches of Ocean City. After the lifeguards go off duty at 5:30 p.m., anglers are allowed to surf-cast off the beaches, and they showed up by the hundreds, standing waist deep in the surf, trying to keep cool and maybe catch a fish.The weekend fare was not what serious surf fishermen dream about, but vacationers seeking a "cool" sport for a few hours were happy to see some surf fishing action.
NEWS
June 28, 2002
Charles Dennis Bartling, who worked at Aberdeen Proving Ground and was a veteran of the Vietnam War, died of hemochromatosis, a rare blood disorder, Sunday at his East Baltimore home. He was 54. At his death, Mr. Bartling was a member of the Department of Defense electrical staff at the Edgewood Area of the proving ground, where he had worked for many years. Born and raised in Dundalk, he was a 1968 graduate of Dundalk High School. He enlisted in the Army in 1969 and served in Vietnam as an armor supply specialist with the 11th Armored Cavalry.
NEWS
June 28, 2002
Charles Dennis Bartling, who worked at Aberdeen Proving Ground and was a veteran of the Vietnam War, died of hemochromatosis, a rare blood disorder, Sunday at his East Baltimore home. He was 54. At his death, Mr. Bartling was a member of the Department of Defense electrical staff at the Edgewood Area of the proving ground, where he had worked for many years. Born and raised in Dundalk, he was a 1968 graduate of Dundalk High School. He enlisted in the Army in 1969 and served in Vietnam as an armor supply specialist with the 11th Armored Cavalry.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes | August 4, 1991
Vacationers come to Ocean City expecting sunny beach weather, but sometimes are disappointed to encounter a day of cloudy weather or drizzle. Avid fishermen head for the U.S. 50 bridge or one of Ocean City's piers, but the novice with two or three children in tow may not be financially prepared for a day of fishing.A good alternative is crabbing. Ocean City's waters are full of crabs this year. Even the lagoons and canals winding through the bay areas of north Ocean City are full of crabs.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | January 28, 2008
Stanley F. Dabkowski, the retired owner of a printers ink supply business, died of heart failure Wednesday at his Parkville home. He was 83. Known as "Dabby" or "the Ink Man," Mr. Dabkowski was born and raised in East Baltimore before moving to Baltimore County as an adult. His son Paul Dabkowski of Lutherville said Mr. Dabkowski left Patterson High School in 11th grade to help support his mother and family. Mr. Dabkowski served in the Army during World War II and was stationed on the Panamanian island of Taboga.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | September 27, 1992
The past few weeks have been excellent for flounder.Anglers have been reeling in anywhere from four to 15 keepers per day, catching them from the U.S. 50 bridge, the bay behind Assateague and the deep holes offshore of the Convention Hall (Buoys 9 through 11). The best baits have been live minnows or frozen shiners dressed with a strip of squid, flounder belly or bluefish strip.Al Lookinghand of Ocean City picked up a 5-pound, 4-ounce flounder drifting north of the U.S. 50 bridge on a shiner and squid combination.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | June 28, 1992
The first white marlin of the season has been caught. Brent Hofmann of Ocean City ventured out to the Washington Canyon with his father, Capt. Ron Hofmann. They trolled an eel for bait from their boat Searoamer, out of Harbor Island. This first white marlin, which was about two weeks late compared with last year, weighed 70 pounds.Yellowfin tuna has showed up in numbers, proving that the water finally warming. Aileen and Ray Delario of South Bethany decided to spend their honeymoon fishing aboard the Grand Slam with Capt.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | May 30, 1993
Ocean City flounder fishing has been exceptionally good. Most anglers are not catching their creel limit of 10 flounder, but the ones they are bringing to the dock are fat and good-sized.Anglers are reporting an average of two to six keepers per trip, which isn't bad for so early in the season.Windy weather can make flounder fishing more difficult. Getting a good drift and finding clean, clear water is important when fishing for flounder. David Stevens of Baltimore found a lucky hole in the Thorofare area of the bay. He landed one of the largest flounder caught last weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne C. Broadwater and Joanne C. Broadwater,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 30, 1998
As dusk falls upon Ocean City, scattered fishermen cast their lines into the surf on a tranquil beach that a few hours earlier was noisy and crowded with sun worshipers.They've come to enjoy the quiet and maybe pull in a bluefish, sea trout or kingfish. Tomorrow they'll head over to the Route 50 bridge or a bayside pier and drop a line there. They can fish the bay for flounder in a skiff, try wreck-fishing on a party boat or go for big game fish on an offshore charter voyage.When it comes to fishing, there's an ocean of opportunities in this Eastern Shore town.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Special to The Sun | August 28, 1994
Last Saturday was a big day for offshore fishermen. We have not had many good offshore days because of windy weather. As soon as fishing gets good, the wind seems to blow, and the boats cannot get out to that "hot spot" again the next day. This was the case on Saturday because by Sunday the winds were gusting and the small craft warnings were posted once again.The party boat MoJo with angler Ted Liebau of Woodbine enjoyed some of this fantastic fishing in the Baltimore Canyon. The boat landed a 99-pound wahoo, released two white marlin and one blue marlin, and caught two tuna.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | October 3, 1993
In a couple of weeks I hope to join a group of pals for an annual surf-fishing trip to Assateague Island.Beginning now and continuing through mid to late November is sort of a heaven on the beach for Atlantic surfcasters. If you want to really touch nature's elements, nothing quite tops a deserted fall beach with a long, powerful fishing rod battling a big bluefish or striped bass (rockfish) in a cold, heavy surf.I'm just now getting back into surf fishing. In the early '70s I did quite a bit during the summer in the Cape May, N.J., area.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | May 30, 1993
Ocean City flounder fishing has been exceptionally good. Most anglers are not catching their creel limit of 10 flounder, but the ones they are bringing to the dock are fat and good-sized.Anglers are reporting an average of two to six keepers per trip, which isn't bad for so early in the season.Windy weather can make flounder fishing more difficult. Getting a good drift and finding clean, clear water is important when fishing for flounder. David Stevens of Baltimore found a lucky hole in the Thorofare area of the bay. He landed one of the largest flounder caught last weekend.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | October 4, 1992
Ocean City sees some of its best fishing in the fall. Anglers line the beaches, able to surf fish all day. No longer are the fishermen subject to time periods and regulations. As long as the fish are biting, anglers fish.The main objective on the beach is catching bluefish. These fish begin to migrate south, feeding on schools of finger mullet, shiners and alewifes. Bluefish are fat, mean and sassy, giving anglers lots of sport. The average-size blue in October is 2 to 6 pounds, with big blues coming in periodically from 9 to 20 pounds.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | September 27, 1992
The past few weeks have been excellent for flounder.Anglers have been reeling in anywhere from four to 15 keepers per day, catching them from the U.S. 50 bridge, the bay behind Assateague and the deep holes offshore of the Convention Hall (Buoys 9 through 11). The best baits have been live minnows or frozen shiners dressed with a strip of squid, flounder belly or bluefish strip.Al Lookinghand of Ocean City picked up a 5-pound, 4-ounce flounder drifting north of the U.S. 50 bridge on a shiner and squid combination.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | August 23, 1992
Vacationers come to Ocean City to frolic on the beach. Some try their luck surf casting, especially on those muggy evenings that are better spent outside. And many wonder, "Do people actually catch anything off the beach?"Anglers expecting to catch large fish (other than sharks and skates) may be sadly disappointed. A big hook baited with a chunk of mullet or squid may while away the time and get a nibble or two, but the real action comes to the angler using a double hooked rig with smaller hooks.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | August 23, 1992
Vacationers come to Ocean City to frolic on the beach. Some try their luck surf casting, especially on those muggy evenings that are better spent outside. And many wonder, "Do people actually catch anything off the beach?"Anglers expecting to catch large fish (other than sharks and skates) may be sadly disappointed. A big hook baited with a chunk of mullet or squid may while away the time and get a nibble or two, but the real action comes to the angler using a double hooked rig with smaller hooks.
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