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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | November 15, 1990
MOSCOW -- Shaken by what they saw in a two-week break in their home districts, Soviet parliamentarians said yesterday that the country is on the brink of famine, political anarchy and civil disorder. They canceled their agenda and called a crisis session for tomorrow to be addressed by President Mikhail S. Gorbachev.The atmosphere of alarm in the Supreme Soviet reflected the feeling on the streets, with a number of developments contributing to the sense of uncertainty:* Without warning, the Soviet government ordered prices freed, beginning today, on so-called luxury goods, including carpets, electronics, furniture and automobile parts.
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By Boston Globe | April 1, 1994
MOSCOW -- A foreign-backed program to provide funds for civilian projects for Russian nuclear-weapons scientists finally started up this week, but Russian officials insisted there be no fanfare for fear it might provoke an outcry from ultranationalists in the Federal Assembly, or parliament.The program calls for the United States, Japan and the European Union to give $12 million to 600 of these scientists in the coming months and $57 million to more than 3,000 over the next few years.The program is driven by the fear that as Russia's military budget declines, its suddenly impoverished nuclear scientists might feel tempted to accept lucrative offers from Iraq, Libya or some other country to help build a nuclear weapon.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 2, 1990
MOSCOW -- The Soviet Union officially ended seven decades of religious repression yesterday with a new law guaranteeing millions of believers the right to confess, practice and teach the faith of their choosing.The 341-2 vote by the U.S.S.R. Supreme Soviet marked the total defeat of state atheism in what was perhaps one of history's longest, cruelest and most determined wars against religious belief.The Law on Freedom of Conscience and Religious Organizations codifies the official tolerance and even encouragement of religion that under the reforms of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has gradually come to replace persecution.
NEWS
By Richard Pipes | October 6, 1993
NOW begins the arduous task of reconciling the Russian nation and building a democratic state on the rubble of communism.The prospects for success look better than at any time since the abdication of Czar Nicholas II in March 1917.Unless President Boris Yeltsin repeats previous mistakes and seeks compromises with his defeated enemies, who interpret readiness to compromise as weakness, we are unlikely ever again to see a resurgence of a militant anti-democratic opposition. The events of the past four days are probably the last outbreak of violent counterrevolution in Russia.
NEWS
July 21, 1992
Not even a year has elapsed since last August's abortive coup d'etat sounded the death knell to the Soviet Union. But Moscow again is a battle ground. Not of tanks or gun-toting soldiers but of politicians trying to bring Russia's free-wheeling media under tighter controls.The Supreme Soviet, the legislature of Russia, has targeted the country's most respected daily newspaper as the test case. It wants to take over Izvestia, which spoke courageously for freedom of the media during the rule of Mikhail S. Gorbachev and has outspokenly exposed corruption and official duplicity ever since.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 22, 1993
MOSCOW -- The Russian legislature dealt its most direct challenge to President Boris N. Yeltsin's free-market reforms yesterday by voting to strip his privatization agency of power to continue selling off state-owned enterprises.The move by the Supreme Soviet was not expected to halt the mass auctions of shares in these companies, but reformers said it could give ex-Communist apparatchiks still entrenched in the government bureaucracy enough legal leverage to bog the process down.Acting while Mr. Yeltsin is away on vacation, the Supreme Soviet authorized government industries and ministries to take over the powers of his State Property Committee, the most dynamic reform agency of the post-Soviet era, and to carry out privatization as they see fit.The Property Committee promptly issued a statement that it has no intention of giving up power.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 6, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russian lawmakers set the stage yesterday for a new confrontation with President Boris N. Yeltsin by voting down his proposed "political truce" and calling the Soviet-era Congress of People's Deputies into session next week to investigate whether he violated the Constitution.The decisions by the Supreme Soviet -- Russia's smaller standing legislature -- capped a week of rising political temperatures, a veiled threat by Mr. Yeltsin to dissolve both lawmaking bodies and rumors of military intervention in an increasingly paralyzed political system.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 7, 1993
MOSCOW -- First they took away his official Mercedes-Benz limo, bodyguards and personal physician. Then his chairmanship government panels on agrarian reform and corruption, and his right to receive visitors in the Kremlin.At 9:45 a.m. yesterday, the second-highest elected official in Russia, Alexander V. Rutskoi, suffered the latest humiliation of his power struggle with President Boris N. Yeltsin: Kremlin security guards stopped the vice president at the door of his own office and turned him away.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 23, 1990
MOSCOW -- In a direct confrontation with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, Boris N. Yeltsin and the leadership of the Russian Federation officially warned the Soviet parliament yesterday not to grant the emergency powers requested by Mr. Gorbachev.In an emotional speech Friday, Mr. Gorbachev asked for the power to override existing law in connection with the planned transition to a market economy.But Russian Federation officials, citing Mr. Gorbachev's statement that he might have to dissolve some elected bodies, expressed fear that he could use special powers to dissolve the Russian parliament and impose direct presidential rule in the largest of the 15 Soviet republics.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 25, 1990
MOSCOW -- The Soviet parliament lost its nerve yesterday at the brink of a historic decision, delegated to President Mikhail S. Gorbachev the task of choosing a plan for a transition to market economy and granted him sweeping new powers to implement it.In a vote of 323-11, with 56 abstentions, the Supreme Soviet approved Mr. Gorbachev's proposal that he produce by Oct. 15 a single scheme to replace the centralized planned economy built over seven decades of...
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | September 22, 1993
MOSCOW -- President Boris N. Yeltsin suddenly dissolved the hostile Russian Parliament last night and announced popular elections for a new legislature, driving the country into its worst political crisis since the collapse of communism two years ago.Moving to cap the debilitating yearlong confrontation with his anti-reform foes in the legislature, the president finally took the step that he had avoided through a succession of earlier skirmishes that sapped...
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 7, 1993
MOSCOW -- First they took away his official Mercedes-Benz limo, bodyguards and personal physician. Then his chairmanship government panels on agrarian reform and corruption, and his right to receive visitors in the Kremlin.At 9:45 a.m. yesterday, the second-highest elected official in Russia, Alexander V. Rutskoi, suffered the latest humiliation of his power struggle with President Boris N. Yeltsin: Kremlin security guards stopped the vice president at the door of his own office and turned him away.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 22, 1993
MOSCOW -- The Russian legislature dealt its most direct challenge to President Boris N. Yeltsin's free-market reforms yesterday by voting to strip his privatization agency of power to continue selling off state-owned enterprises.The move by the Supreme Soviet was not expected to halt the mass auctions of shares in these companies, but reformers said it could give ex-Communist apparatchiks still entrenched in the government bureaucracy enough legal leverage to bog the process down.Acting while Mr. Yeltsin is away on vacation, the Supreme Soviet authorized government industries and ministries to take over the powers of his State Property Committee, the most dynamic reform agency of the post-Soviet era, and to carry out privatization as they see fit.The Property Committee promptly issued a statement that it has no intention of giving up power.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | May 7, 1993
MOSCOW -- The Russian people have shown that they want action, President Boris N. Yeltsin said last night, and he promised to give it to them.Moving to capitalize on his victory in the April 25 referendum, he said in a nationally televised address that he would push for new parliamentary elections, dismiss bureaucrats who were retarding his reforms and maintain a vigilant guard against the dangers posed by "neo-Bolsheviks.""The referendum has confirmed that the people of Russia really want radical changes in Russia," he said.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Staff Writer | April 22, 1993
SARANSK, Russia -- Here in Mordovia, 300 miles east of Moscow, the legislature has accomplished what the national parliament has unsuccessfully shouted, schemed and lusted over for months.Blaming the republic's president for the moribund economy, the Supreme Soviet of Mordovia has simply abolished the presidency. Russia's president, Boris N. Yeltsin, who has been fighting off a similar assault on his own job, can only watch uneasily and hope that events here will not foreshadow those in the nation at large.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | March 24, 1993
MOSCOW -- A high court ruling that found President Boris N Yeltsin to have violated the constitution clears the way for his removal from office, the leader of the Russian legislature said yesterday."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 12, 1990
MOSCOW -- The Soviet leadership was in disarray yesterday after a wild day in parliament in which President Mikhail S. Gorbachev in effect rejected the economic reform program of Prime Minister Nikolai I. Ryzhkov but said Mr. Ryzhkov nonetheless should stay on in office.Mr. Gorbachev said he would try once more to hammer out a compromise between the Ryzhkov plan and the more radical economic program produced by a team led by Gorbachev aide Stanislav Shatalin, which the Soviet president said he favors.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Staff Writer | April 22, 1993
SARANSK, Russia -- Here in Mordovia, 300 miles east of Moscow, the legislature has accomplished what the national parliament has unsuccessfully shouted, schemed and lusted over for months.Blaming the republic's president for the moribund economy, the Supreme Soviet of Mordovia has simply abolished the presidency. Russia's president, Boris N. Yeltsin, who has been fighting off a similar assault on his own job, can only watch uneasily and hope that events here will not foreshadow those in the nation at large.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 6, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russian lawmakers set the stage yesterday for a new confrontation with President Boris N. Yeltsin by voting down his proposed "political truce" and calling the Soviet-era Congress of People's Deputies into session next week to investigate whether he violated the Constitution.The decisions by the Supreme Soviet -- Russia's smaller standing legislature -- capped a week of rising political temperatures, a veiled threat by Mr. Yeltsin to dissolve both lawmaking bodies and rumors of military intervention in an increasingly paralyzed political system.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 10, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin backed away yesterday from an electoral test of strength with conservative lawmakers by dropping his insistence on an April referendum that he had hoped would bolster his executive powers.Instead, he called for "a year of moratorium on all political fist fighting" to let Russia stabilize its plummeting economy. That should be followed by elections of lawmakers in 1994 and a new president in 1995 -- each a year ahead of schedule, he said.The president's retreat from the constitutional referendum, his highest political priority this year, appeared to dim his hopes for moving Russia beyond its obsolete Soviet-era institutions and the former Communists who control them.
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