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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 1, 2007
CAIRO, Egypt -- Iran's supreme leader gave a ringing endorsement yesterday to President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's foreign policy, suggesting that Iran's top authority favors an ultra-conservative hard-line bloc over those seeking rapprochement with the West. Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei is the final arbiter of political, military and religious decisions in Iran's government. Khamenei, with Ahmadinejad at his side, backed the government's hard-line course. Khamenei said Iran would continue to develop advanced nuclear technology and rejected the Bush administration's accusations that Iran was meddling in Iraq and Afghanistan.
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NEWS
February 9, 2012
When gauging Iran's threat to Israel, its important to remember that President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's proclamations about "wiping Israel off the map" have been rebutted by Ayatollah Khamenei, who as Supreme Leader of Iran has more authority than the president and more influence on foreign policy ("Nuclear saber-rattling," Feb. 6). But Israel knows this, of course, just as surely as it knows that the Iranian leadership is not crazy or suicidal and so wouldn't attack Israel with nuclear weapons even if it could or wanted to. With the existential threat fig leaf stripped away, the bullying behind Israel's saber-rattling becomes plain to see. Also, remember that President Barack Obama allowed the sale of bunker-buster bombs to Israel - the kind needed to reach underground nuclear facilities - which gave Israel the credibility to threaten and bluster.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 17, 1998
CAIRO, Egypt -- In a sermon punctuated by cries of "Death to America," Ayatollah Ali Khamenei laid down a tough line yesterday against any normalizing of ties with the United States, saying such scandalous talk must not be tolerated.But Iran's supreme leader stopped short of criticizing Mohammad Khatami, the country's popular president who last week urged a U.S.-Iranian cultural exchange, professed admiration for American civilization and suggested removing the wall of mistrust" between the two countries.
NEWS
December 19, 2011
The death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il leaves a cloud of uncertainty over North Asia and complicates efforts by the U.S. and its allies to halt the nuclear weapons program that is the principal legacy of his 17-year rule. Kim was a canny and manipulative despot who repeatedly thwarted efforts by more powerful neighbors and adversaries like the United States to stabilize the Korean peninsula. Now that he is gone, the internal power struggle over succession could have unpredictable and perhaps dangerous consequences for the region and the world.
NEWS
By Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi,Los Angeles Times | January 22, 2008
TEHRAN, Iran -- Iran watchers sought to make sense yesterday of a spat between the conservative speaker of parliament and the country's hard-line president over a budgetary issue that found Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei issuing a rare but opaque opinion. The incident was the latest sign of discord with the Islamic Republic's byzantine ruling system, which combines elements of a democratically elected republic with a theocracy headed by Shiite Muslim clerics, with Khamenei over both. Parliament Speaker Gholam Ali Haddad-Adel read yesterday from the text of the supreme leader's opinion, which the lawmaker said backed his position in a dispute with President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 2007
TEHRAN, IRAN -- Iran's outspoken president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, appears to be under pressure from the highest authorities in Iran to end his involvement in the country's nuclear program, a sign that his political capital is declining as his country comes under increasing international pressure. Less than a month after the United Nations Security Council imposed sanctions on Iran to curb its nuclear program, two hard-line newspapers, including one owned by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, called on the president to stay out of all matters nuclear.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 30, 2004
TEHRAN, Iran - The governors of Iran's 28 provinces called yesterday for postponement of next month's parliamentary elections until hard-line Islamic clerics lift a ban on thousands of liberal candidates. The governors are flexing their muscles in an increasingly acrimonious dispute with Iran's ruling religious clerics, who have been trying to take back control of the parliament from reform politicians by keeping reformists off the ballot next month. Since the governors organize balloting in their respective provinces, they have the ability to scuttle the Feb. 20 polls if they choose.
NEWS
November 5, 2001
WASHINGTON should improve relations with Iran. But only if that nation wants to, and it cannot decide. As things stand, the United States is keeping Iran out of the World Trade Organization and accusing it of supporting terrorism. Iran condemns the Sept. 11 events and will rescue U.S. pilots who come down from Afghan air space. But its supreme leader still calls the United States the Great Satan. A committee of parliament urged President Mohammad Khatami to improve relations with the United States in order to consult on Afghanistan's future.
NEWS
February 9, 2012
When gauging Iran's threat to Israel, its important to remember that President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's proclamations about "wiping Israel off the map" have been rebutted by Ayatollah Khamenei, who as Supreme Leader of Iran has more authority than the president and more influence on foreign policy ("Nuclear saber-rattling," Feb. 6). But Israel knows this, of course, just as surely as it knows that the Iranian leadership is not crazy or suicidal and so wouldn't attack Israel with nuclear weapons even if it could or wanted to. With the existential threat fig leaf stripped away, the bullying behind Israel's saber-rattling becomes plain to see. Also, remember that President Barack Obama allowed the sale of bunker-buster bombs to Israel - the kind needed to reach underground nuclear facilities - which gave Israel the credibility to threaten and bluster.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 19, 2002
TEHRAN, Iran - A student demonstration in support of a popular reformist professor who has been sentenced to die for blaspheming Islam turned bloody yesterday when extremists supporting Iran's theocracy clashed with the students at Tehran's Sharif University. One student speaker suffered a cracked skull and cuts and was carried off by friends during the attack by roughly 500 members of the hard-line militia group Ansareh Hezbollah, or Friends of the Party of God, witnesses said. A number of other students also were injured.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim,Tribune Newspapers | June 16, 2009
TEHRAN, Iran - - Hundreds of thousands of Iranian protesters defied authorities Monday and marched to Tehran's Freedom Square, as the Islamic Republic's supreme leader ordered an investigation into allegations of voter fraud that the opposition described as little more than an attempt to dampen anger over the re-election of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, ordered the Guardian Council, which is filled with his own appointees and led by a hard-line cleric close to Ahmadinejad, to examine challenger Mir-Hossein Mousavi's claims of vote fraud.
NEWS
By Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi,Los Angeles Times | January 22, 2008
TEHRAN, Iran -- Iran watchers sought to make sense yesterday of a spat between the conservative speaker of parliament and the country's hard-line president over a budgetary issue that found Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei issuing a rare but opaque opinion. The incident was the latest sign of discord with the Islamic Republic's byzantine ruling system, which combines elements of a democratically elected republic with a theocracy headed by Shiite Muslim clerics, with Khamenei over both. Parliament Speaker Gholam Ali Haddad-Adel read yesterday from the text of the supreme leader's opinion, which the lawmaker said backed his position in a dispute with President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 1, 2007
CAIRO, Egypt -- Iran's supreme leader gave a ringing endorsement yesterday to President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's foreign policy, suggesting that Iran's top authority favors an ultra-conservative hard-line bloc over those seeking rapprochement with the West. Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei is the final arbiter of political, military and religious decisions in Iran's government. Khamenei, with Ahmadinejad at his side, backed the government's hard-line course. Khamenei said Iran would continue to develop advanced nuclear technology and rejected the Bush administration's accusations that Iran was meddling in Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 2007
TEHRAN, IRAN -- Iran's outspoken president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, appears to be under pressure from the highest authorities in Iran to end his involvement in the country's nuclear program, a sign that his political capital is declining as his country comes under increasing international pressure. Less than a month after the United Nations Security Council imposed sanctions on Iran to curb its nuclear program, two hard-line newspapers, including one owned by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, called on the president to stay out of all matters nuclear.
NEWS
By Nahid Siamdoust and Megan K. Stack and Nahid Siamdoust and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 23, 2005
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran's hard-line Guardian Council disqualified more than 1,000 reformist presidential hopefulsyesterday, narrowing a diverse field of candidates for next month's election to just six conservative contenders. The surprise announcement all but guarantees that a conservative will take over the presidency from moderate Mohammad Khatami, whose attempts at reform have been stifled in the increasingly hard-line political climate of recent years. Iran's largest reform party decried the disqualifications and threatened to boycott the June 17 election unless the Guardian Council, which answers directly to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, reversed the decision.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 30, 2004
TEHRAN, Iran - The governors of Iran's 28 provinces called yesterday for postponement of next month's parliamentary elections until hard-line Islamic clerics lift a ban on thousands of liberal candidates. The governors are flexing their muscles in an increasingly acrimonious dispute with Iran's ruling religious clerics, who have been trying to take back control of the parliament from reform politicians by keeping reformists off the ballot next month. Since the governors organize balloting in their respective provinces, they have the ability to scuttle the Feb. 20 polls if they choose.
NEWS
By Nahid Siamdoust and Megan K. Stack and Nahid Siamdoust and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 23, 2005
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran's hard-line Guardian Council disqualified more than 1,000 reformist presidential hopefulsyesterday, narrowing a diverse field of candidates for next month's election to just six conservative contenders. The surprise announcement all but guarantees that a conservative will take over the presidency from moderate Mohammad Khatami, whose attempts at reform have been stifled in the increasingly hard-line political climate of recent years. Iran's largest reform party decried the disqualifications and threatened to boycott the June 17 election unless the Guardian Council, which answers directly to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, reversed the decision.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 24, 1998
TEHRAN, Iran -- A year after an election that changed the face of Iranian politics, students and other Iranians gathered by the thousands yesterday to celebrate the openness instilled by President Mohammad Khatami.But the anniversary rally came against a backdrop of sharpening tensions between moderate Iranians who reveled in the memory of Khatami's overwhelming victory and conservatives who view his popularity as a threat to their longtime grip on power.Along with Iran's supreme leader, the more conservative Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Khatami has tried to calm that strained situation in recent weeks.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 19, 2002
TEHRAN, Iran - A student demonstration in support of a popular reformist professor who has been sentenced to die for blaspheming Islam turned bloody yesterday when extremists supporting Iran's theocracy clashed with the students at Tehran's Sharif University. One student speaker suffered a cracked skull and cuts and was carried off by friends during the attack by roughly 500 members of the hard-line militia group Ansareh Hezbollah, or Friends of the Party of God, witnesses said. A number of other students also were injured.
NEWS
November 5, 2001
WASHINGTON should improve relations with Iran. But only if that nation wants to, and it cannot decide. As things stand, the United States is keeping Iran out of the World Trade Organization and accusing it of supporting terrorism. Iran condemns the Sept. 11 events and will rescue U.S. pilots who come down from Afghan air space. But its supreme leader still calls the United States the Great Satan. A committee of parliament urged President Mohammad Khatami to improve relations with the United States in order to consult on Afghanistan's future.
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