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By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | April 25, 2008
In a speech before more than 1,000 law students and attorneys at Baltimore's Lyric Opera House yesterday, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia set out to dispel the notion that his judicial philosophy always leads him to ultra-conservative opinions. He pointed to an instance where he agreed that flag burning was a form of protected and legal speech. Scalia said the morning after the court's opinion was announced, his "very conservative" wife began humming You're a Grand Old Flag over breakfast as a form of protest.
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By Cal Thomas | April 26, 2014
Honestly, unless you are a big government liberal, how many people think the federal government should have more power than it already exercises over its citizens? Former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, 94, thinks the Constitution needs at least six amendments in order to bring the country more in line with what he believes is good for us. He outlines them in his new book, "Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution. " It is a revealing look into liberal thinking and the ideological opposite of radio talk show host Mark Levin's book, "The Liberty Amendments: Restoring theAmerican Republic.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston | August 30, 1998
WASHINGTON - Any time the Supreme Court and the nation lose a justice who has stood above the other jurists who have served there, monuments to that influence are lined up to be worshiped, like the solid and towering Druid relics at Stonehenge.Seldom does an observer stop to shed a quiet tear over a loss of civility and humility. Those qualities were two of the outstanding monuments left by Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr., who died last week at age 90, passing away quietly in his sleep at home in Richmond.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
As a long-haired teen growing up in the 1960s, Jim McCullough had little clue what he wanted to do with his life, but two things did stir him: He hated the way some people in Laurel, his hometown, looked down on his African-American friends, and he loved using the wood lathe in shop class. He has traded the hippie locks for a grandfather's trim goatee. He long ago gained renown in the region as a master furniture craftsman, at times for his work on pieces used by government officials from presidents to attorneys general.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington BureauWashington Bureau Staff writer John Rivera contributed to this article | February 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- It is unconstitutional for the government to give women a special preference when they seek radio or television station licenses, a federal appeals court here ruled yesterday -- in a decision written by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.The U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in a 2-1 ruling on a dispute over a Frederick County radio license, nullified a series of federal laws as well as the Federal Communications Commission's 13-year-old policy aimed at getting more women into station ownership.
NEWS
By Maura Reynolds and Maura Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - The Senate ended the filibuster of California Supreme Court Justice Janice Rogers Brown yesterday when 10 Democrats crossed party lines and voted to close debate, clearing the way for a confirmation vote today on her nomination to the second-most powerful court in the country. The motion to end debate passed 65-32, more than the 60 votes required. Brown is expected to be the second long-stalled judicial nominee confirmed after a bipartisan group of maverick and traditionalist senators cut a deal last month to break an impasse over confirming President Bush's picks for the federal courts.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The powerful Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, which opened a drive yesterday against Senate confirmation of Judge Clarence Thomas as a U.S. Supreme Court justice, will aim its campaign at the 66 senators whose votes last year fell one short of overriding President Bush's veto of the 1990 civil rights bill.Ralph G. Neas, executive director of the Leadership Conference, said at a news conference that the organization would call upon all senators "not to make a decision . . . until they have had an opportunity to weigh all the evidence."
NEWS
July 9, 1992
Gov. Bill Clinton said he would nominate as a Supreme Court justice only a person who supports Roe vs. Wade, the abortion decision. So Bill Moyers asked Governor Clinton, "Is that not a litmus test?" Such litmus testing of judicial nominees is what the Democrats have been criticizing the Reagan and Bush administrations for applying for years. (Their test was supposed to find judges who opposed the Roe decision.)The governor's answer was, "It is, and it makes me uncomfortable, [but] I would want the first judge I appointed to believe in the right to privacy and the right to choose."
NEWS
June 16, 1993
The first critics of Supreme Court nominee Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg were pro-choice leaders. That is doubly surprising. It is a surprise to the critics themselves because candidate Bill Clinton promised them he would apply a "litmus test" to this nomination. The test was that the nominee support Roe vs. Wade, which Judge Ginsburg has criticized. But today's criticism is itself a surprise. We say that because closely read, Judge Ginsburg's views on Roe are not really inconsistent with the ideals of the pro-choice movement.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 28, 1993
ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- Jan and Roberta DeBoer have given up their long and bitter court fight and told 2 1/2 -year-old Jessica she is going away.U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens refused Monday to block a Michigan Supreme Court order that the girl be returned next week to her birth parents, Daniel and Cara Schmidt of Blairstown, Iowa."
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
Vice President Joe Biden and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan will visit a new, $112 million building next month that will house the University of Baltimore School of Law, school officials said Monday. The John and Frances Angelos Law Center, which has been under construction since 2010 and is an anchor of development in the North Charles Street corridor, will also host Gov. Martin O'Malley and Maryland Court of Appeals Chief Judge Robert M. Bell during a series of opening celebrations next month.
NEWS
March 28, 2012
After three days of arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court, the case for the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, better known as "Obamacare," remains strong. Four members of the court, including the justice expected to be the key swing vote on the issue, asked tough questions of the government's lawyer about the requirement that individuals obtain health insurance that is at the heart of the case against the law. But the inaptness of the comparisons they used to call the individual mandate into question reveal the uniqueness of the health insurance market and the propriety of Congress' decision to regulate it in the way it did. And even as the justices questioned whether Congress overstepped its powers, they risked doing the same.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 12, 2011
Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer finds it remarkable that the walls of this republic did not come tumbling down when the court put a quick stop to the recount of the 2000 presidential election vote in Florida. The vote was 5-4, split along the court's ideological lines. It gave George W. Bush a critical victory in the state where his brother was governor; the rest is sad history. After the court's decision, the losing candidate, Al Gore, told his supporters to g'wan home now, and to refrain from attacking the decision.
NEWS
By David G. Savage, Tribune Newspapers | May 18, 2010
— The Supreme Court set an apparent blueprint Monday for upholding recently enacted health care changes and its national mandate that all Americans have insurance, saying Congress has a "broad authority" to pass laws that are "rationally related" to carrying out its constitutional aims. The Constitution not only gives Congress the power to regulate interstate commerce, the justices said, but also the authority to enact all laws that are "necessary and proper" to carrying out this authority.
NEWS
By Robert Barnes and The Washington Post | April 4, 2010
Around here, one of the most powerful men in the nation is known as plain old John Stevens. But those who cross paths with him in his second home of South Florida have the same question as the president of the United States, the leadership of Congress, abortion-rights combatants, disgruntled conservative legal activists and grateful civil libertarians, all of whom know him as Justice John Paul Stevens. "Do you think he's going to retire?" asks his friend Raymond Doumar, 83, who met Stevens years ago while waiting for a tennis match.
NEWS
January 28, 2010
When one person's ability to make himself heard is may times superior to that of his neighbor, that first person can overpower the voice of the second and drown it out. When this is done, the second person's right to free expression has been denied because such drowned-out speech does not exist in any practical sense if nobody hears it. The Supreme Court, in ruling that there shall be no limits on corporate donations to political candidates, empowered...
NEWS
April 17, 1992
Last year, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference endorsed Clarence Thomas' nomination to be a Supreme Court justice. It was the only civil rights organization to do so. This week, the SCLC board at a meeting in Baltimore voted "no confidence" in Justice Thomas.Justice Thomas has cast several votes and written an opinion that dismay civil rights supporters. He has agreed with the court's most conservative member, Antonin Scalia, in almost every case. But we think it is a little early to give up on Justice Thomas.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2005
A short stroll through Annapolis - starting at the State House grounds, then heading over to Main Street down to the water - provides a window into the long walk of black history in America that is ideal for adults and children alike. Several public artworks in Annapolis are well worth the time it takes to walk between them as portals to the past. The Colonial-era city was made for walking, so no two points are far apart. Like Maryland itself, the state capital contains contradictions when it comes to its record on race.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | April 25, 2008
In a speech before more than 1,000 law students and attorneys at Baltimore's Lyric Opera House yesterday, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia set out to dispel the notion that his judicial philosophy always leads him to ultra-conservative opinions. He pointed to an instance where he agreed that flag burning was a form of protected and legal speech. Scalia said the morning after the court's opinion was announced, his "very conservative" wife began humming You're a Grand Old Flag over breakfast as a form of protest.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | October 4, 2005
Washington -- By nominating White House counsel Harriet E. Miers to the Supreme Court, President Bush departed from the recent practice of promoting judges to the high court, but returned to a tradition of choosing prominent politicians and trusted advisers. If confirmed, Miers would be the first justice to join the court without any judicial experience since William H. Rehnquist, who was nominated 33 years ago when he was an assistant attorney general in the Nixon administration. Others in the long line of nonjudges include former Chief Justice Earl Warren and Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr. Friends and colleagues of Miers said her work as a lawyer, her leadership of the Dallas and Texas bar associations and her service with the Dallas City Council, the Texas Lottery Commission and the White House offset any gaps posed by her lack of background on the bench.
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