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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | November 2, 1990
A woman's unflagging pursuit of child support payments that were lost by two state agencies has convinced the Maryland Department of Human Resources to order a review of all delinquent support cases in Baltimore over the past six months.Kate Franks, who lives in Savage but collects her child support through the Baltimore City Department of Social Services, has finally been told what she knew all along -- her missing checks, totaling $1,050, were lost in bureaucratic limbo.Franks was sure her ex-husband had made the payments because his paycheck is garnished every week in Georgia.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
The state this month will begin sending all child support payments electronically, a move that the Maryland Department of Human Resources said Wednesday will save $1.4 million. The Child Support Enforcement Administration says eliminating the paper check option in favor of direct deposit and a new Electronic Payment Issuance Card for custodial parents will be easier, faster and safer for families. The state will save on the cost of printing and mailing checks. "Families shouldn't have to wait for a check to arrive by mail to receive child support payments we collect on their behalf," Maryland Department of Human Resources Secretary Ted Dallas said in a statement.
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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | March 22, 1992
The Department of Social Services knew Calvin Thornton's whereaboutsfor the past 12 years.The department had him summoned to CarrollCircuit Court at least eight times from 1982 to 1990. Each time, he showed up.Each time he was reminded of his obligation to pay child support.Each time, he failed to do so, officials said.They even had him put in jail for 179 days in 1985, back when he owed less than $5,000 to the Westminster woman who was his wife and is the mother of his 12-year-old child.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
The state contractor that collects child support payments in Baltimore continues to have trouble meeting the terms of its agreement, according to a report released Wednesday by the Office of Legislative Audits calling for better oversight by the Department of Human Resources. In a follow-up review after blasting the agency last year for not doing enough to collect payments, the auditors said the state had completed or begun to address nearly all issues, but noted that the department had made only "minimal progress" addressing contracting issues in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2003
Maximus Inc., the Virginia company that has run Baltimore's child support enforcement program for four years, appears to have lost its bid for a new state contract to a rival firm. The Department of Human Resources has recommended that the Board of Public Works award the lucrative contract to Denver-based Policy Studies Inc. The contract, which runs at least 4 1/4 years and perhaps as long as 6 1/4 years, is worth an estimated $10 million to $15 million a year to the contractor. The decision prompted House Appropriations Committee Chairman Howard P. Rawlings to write a letter to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. urging him to reject the procurement.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | December 27, 2004
Richard Eidinger Jr. has been in and out of court for two years. He's been locked up. And he's been threatened with more jail time if he doesn't pay more of the $26,000 in child support he owes his ex-wife. Still, the 26-year-old father acknowledges that he hasn't managed to pay more than $70 a week lately. He told a judge at a recent contempt hearing in Baltimore County Circuit Court that it's not because he doesn't want to make his payments but because he can't find a good-paying job. "I think we should find him a better job," Judge John O. Hennegan responded.
NEWS
February 21, 1993
The Carroll County delegates have withdrawn a bill they originally filed seeking to collect a service fee from parents who have to be forced to make child support payments.Del. Donald B. Elliott said the bill could have backfired by jeopardizing federal money the county already receives to do the same thing.The delegation withdrew Bill 552 Friday at the request of the county commissioners, who had asked that it be filed in the first place, said Mr. Elliott, a District 4B Republican.The bill sought to allow the county to collect a fee from parents to cover the administrative cost of taking them to court and keeping them on a payment schedule.
NEWS
September 19, 1991
Less than half of Maryland's 260,000 families entitled to child support actually receive it. For 123,000 families on welfare, the situation is even worse: 75 percent of these families never receive support payments from spouses. The link between the two groups is more than coincidental. Too often, the state must close the gap between what children need to survive and what they get from absentee parents.In the '80s, states and the federal government put real teeth in collection efforts, using Social Security numbers and computers to tap wages, income tax refunds and even lottery winnings of spouses responsible for support payments.
NEWS
By Robin Miller | March 31, 1995
WE RECENTLY learned that the state income tax return that my wife Debbie was expecting won't be coming. That $814 check that was owed to her (we filed jointly, but only she was due a refund) has been sent to my ex-wife to cover back child support payments that I owe.This is part of the state's effort to crack down on deadbeat dads. Politicians from Bill Clinton on down all agree that such measures are necessary to get deadbeat dads to pay up. But the politicians seem to have forgotten the rights of many innocent people, including Debbie.
NEWS
November 12, 1998
STUDIES of a $12 million multi-city program to help poor, absentee fathers become better parents are not encouraging.The goal was to increase the income and employment of the fathers so that they could better provide for their children and take some of the pressure off mothers.But researchers at the Manpower Development Research Corp. in New York found that the efforts either failed and were only moderately successful in getting the men to make child support payments.The study of the Parents' Fair Share looked at projects in seven cities -- Los Angeles; Memphis; Jacksonville, Fla.; Dayton, Ohio; Grand Rapids, Mich.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
When a state agency tried to hire a new contractor to run a call center that fields inquiries about child support payments, an appeals panel intervened and called the process "deeply flawed" and "unreasonable, illogical and improper. " The move would have replaced the current company with a less-experienced firm that proposed running the center with about half as many live operators despite a projected increase in call volume. But in a rare move, the panel overturned the decision to award the new contract.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
Maryland officials said on Friday that they had seized $400,000 in overdue child support payments from one parent, the largest such collection state history. "I hope that this collection sends a clear message to non-custodial parents that Maryland is committed to collecting the support that is due to our children," said a statement from Ted Dallas, the secretary of the Department of Human Resources. The agency is charged with collecting child-support payments and has investigators with the Child Support Enforcement Administration.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 22, 2010
Some child support payments in Maryland could soon go up - a change that state Human Resources Secretary Brenda Donald called "long overdue." For the first time in two decades, lawmakers are poised to revise the guidelines that courts use to set child support when divorcing or unmarried parents cannot agree on an amount. Those guidelines are based on household expense data from the 1970s, and although they accommodate rising incomes, advocates say they don't account for the escalating costs of raising a child.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | November 4, 2009
Maryland's child support guidelines are based on economic data from the 1970s - something the state Department of Human Resources hopes to change next year. The department is pushing a new set of guidelines that would increase the amount most noncustodial parents pay. For the lowest-income families, child support payments would go down slightly, which department officials say could decrease the number of parents who dodge the system. Human Resources officials, who oversee court-ordered child support collection, have unsuccessfully lobbied state lawmakers several times in recent years to update the guidelines, which underwent their last major revision in 1988.
NEWS
October 27, 2008
A state legislative audit has found that the Child Support Enforcement Administration is owed $1.5 billion in unpaid child support payments. That sounds like a lot of money - and a lot of deadbeat dads - until you realize the figure includes the cumulative unpaid child support since the agency began keeping records in the 1974. Much of the debt still on the books was incurred by absent parents who have long since died or disappeared; the state's chief auditor estimates that only about half of it would be considered collectible today.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | May 5, 2008
Of those everyone loves to hate, few can compete with the deadbeat dad for longevity. How much do we hate him? While we're counting the ways, Fox TV may try to help America organize its contempt and put a face on this loathsome character. Bad Dads, redundant in these male-bashing times, is the name of a new reality show Fox is considering. While the network reviews the pilot, outraged fathers' advocates are trying to nip this bad seed before it buds. As proposed, the show features a bounty hunter sort of character, which is not an entirely fictional device.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 27, 1997
A former Prince George's County auto mechanic has been arrested on charges he failed to make more than $45,000 in child support payments over the past five years, federal officials said yesterday.Vincent Hahn, 52, formerly of Cheverly, was arrested in Hendersonville, N.C., where officials say he had moved to avoid making monthly payments of $748 to support his three daughters.Hahn is charged with violating federal child support recovery laws. No trial date has been set.Pub Date: 8/27/97
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | May 8, 1992
The city Sheriff's Department early today sent a Happy Mother's Day message to 110 people in Baltimore who are delinquent in their child support payments.Sheriff's deputies began executing warrants for parents who have been tardy or negligent in their payment of child support fees. Twenty-nine people had been picked up by noon.The two-day sweep, dubbed Operation Mother's Day, will conclude by Monday. Officials would not disclose when they will make their next round of arrests to avoid tipping off offenders.
NEWS
February 7, 2006
The heated debates during the crafting of the 1996 welfare reform law were memorable for one point of agreement between those on opposite sides of the issue. If welfare mothers were being asked to be more responsible for their children's economic well-being, both sides concurred, then absentee dads were fair game, too. Get the bums to pay child support, the thinking went, and the welfare rolls would shrink. Within the first four years of passage of the law, the rolls did shrink and the number of welfare cases closed because of child support collected increased by 56 percent, according to the U.S. Department of Heath and Human Services Child support collection rates have been rising ever since, from $12 billion to $22 billion since the law was passed.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2005
Thousands of Maryland residents who owe back child support are being encouraged to pay up as part of a two-week amnesty program offered by the state Department of Human Resources. The amnesty program, which targets 30,000 state residents, some of whom risk arrest for failure to pay child support, begins today and will end Aug. 13. The program is also being offered in Washington and Arlington, Va., as part of a tri-jurisdictional effort to support families. "You can imagine that Prince George's County shares a number of cases with the District of Columbia and Northern Virginia," said Brian Shea, executive director of Maryland's Child Support Enforcement Administration.
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