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By Henry Scarupa | February 19, 1991
Yellow ribbons suddenly appeared on all student lockers at Wicomico High School in Salisbury this week, in a show of support for U.S. troops in the Persian Gulf. The project was carried out by the school's SOS (Students Organized Service) group, with volunteers working late last Friday tying several hundred ribbons.Another student project is the sale of T-shirts showing an eagle and the American flag, topped by the message, "Support our troops for world peace." Says Judy Tan, a 17-year-old senior, "The T-shirts are not pro-war or anti-war.
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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
A couple that police said were posing as fundraisers for the "Support Our Troops Foundation" outside a Glen Burnie grocery store were charged Friday. Police said Amanda Ashley Miskimon and Matthew David Michalski were not authorized to collect donations on behalf of the foundation and were pocketing the money. Officers were called to a Giant supermarket on Crain Highway by a person who had donated funds and called the number on a flier the couple were distributing and heard their cellphone ringing.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | March 24, 1991
He looms above the road on his hind legs, like the star of a Japanese horror movie. At night, his bulk, rising two stories into the sky, is awash in spotlights.Sometimes he sports patriotic slogans, other times it's the "All Male Review."But today, they'll let the air out of the 35-foot dinosaur in front of the Jewel of the Nile Nightclub on Dorsey Road. Parents will have to come up with another cheap thrill for their children; drivers can keep their eyes on the road.The owners of the bar, next to the Timbuktu Restaurant, rented the giant dinosaur to show support for the troops fighting in the gulf.
NEWS
March 16, 2007
Redirect war funds to care for veterans The Sun's article "Flawed jewel" (March 11) was heart-wrenching, alarming and frustrating. This article by Robert Little - along with his award-winning report on the experimental drug used on soldiers ("Dangerous remedy," Nov. 19-Nov. 21) and Bob Woodruff's recent reports on ABC about the Department of Veterans Affairs' handling of injured veterans - have made me very angry. I am so tired of hearing that glittering generality President Bush regularly utters - "support our troops."
NEWS
March 11, 2005
Army's shortage of tourniquets is outrageous After reading that a soldier's life might have been saved had he had a $20 nylon-and-plastic tourniquet, we should all be enraged ("Modern combat lacking in old medical supply," March 6). 1st Lt. David R. Bernstein died serving America, but America did not serve him. We've heard of unarmored Humvees and other military vehicles without adequate armor. Now The Sun reports that not only don't the soldiers have inexpensive tourniquets but many go into battle without $2 cravat bandages, something the military has used for hundreds of years as improvised tourniquets.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 18, 2003
WASHINGTON - Closing ranks behind President Bush as the nation marches toward war with Iraq, senior Republicans and Democrats in Congress said yesterday that they would put aside deep and long-standing differences over the conflict to unite in support of U.S. troops about to be sent into combat. Even as some harshly criticized Bush for failing to win international support for an offensive against Saddam Hussein, top Democrats signaled that the time for challenging his course was coming swiftly to an end. Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan, the senior Democrat on the Armed Services Committee and one of his party's staunchest opponents of a war in Iraq without United Nations approval, said yesterday that he was finished clashing with Bush on Iraq.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 4, 2005
BOSTON - I am driving down the coast, EZ-Passing across borders from Maine to Massachusetts, when the radio begins the day's news with a familiar bulletin: "There's been another day of violence in Iraq today." A description of suicide bombers and victims follows. Slowly, I turn to another highway distraction, counting the cars that pass me wearing ribbon magnets and decals that display the same slogan: "Support Our Troops." I automatically read "Support Our Troops" as a proxy statement for "Support Our Commander in Chief."
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | October 20, 2006
Those "Support Our Troops" car magnets bother me for some reason. I think it's the implied rebuke - that since I'm driving around without one, I'm not supporting the men and women in Iraq and Afghanistan as much as someone who has undertaken the heroic and self-sacrificing act of slapping a magnet on his or her car. So I had to laugh when I spotted one variation, which encouraged, "Support the magnetic ribbon industry." Just how hollow the support-our-troops sentiment has become was on full display at a hearing at Fort Meade yesterday, where testimony concluded in the case of the highest-ranking soldier charged with criminal violations for his role in the Abu Ghraib detainee abuse case.
NEWS
December 3, 1995
The pros and cons of troops in BosniaThe only decision worse than sending peace-keeping troops to Bosnia would be not sending them. The consequences of our failure to do so would be unthinkable. It would be better if no nation invaded another, if naked military aggression, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity were not committed and, when these atrocities did occur, it would have been better if Europe had forcefully stepped in and stopped them.But that's history. There is only one superpower and only one democracy with the moral power to stop the killing of innocent women and children in Bosnia.
NEWS
February 25, 1991
Helping the EnemyEditor: I've been pondering the theater of the absurd. That's what television and, to a lesser degree, some radio and print news has become since Operation Desert Shield became the Persian Gulf war and Operation Desert Storm last month.Consider the historical perspective. Let us say, for example, that the satellite and other communications technology we have today existed in 1942 and the media were called to a news conference at the headquarters of Adm. Chester Nimitz, the Pacific Fleet commander, in Hawaii.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | October 20, 2006
Those "Support Our Troops" car magnets bother me for some reason. I think it's the implied rebuke - that since I'm driving around without one, I'm not supporting the men and women in Iraq and Afghanistan as much as someone who has undertaken the heroic and self-sacrificing act of slapping a magnet on his or her car. So I had to laugh when I spotted one variation, which encouraged, "Support the magnetic ribbon industry." Just how hollow the support-our-troops sentiment has become was on full display at a hearing at Fort Meade yesterday, where testimony concluded in the case of the highest-ranking soldier charged with criminal violations for his role in the Abu Ghraib detainee abuse case.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 4, 2005
BOSTON - I am driving down the coast, EZ-Passing across borders from Maine to Massachusetts, when the radio begins the day's news with a familiar bulletin: "There's been another day of violence in Iraq today." A description of suicide bombers and victims follows. Slowly, I turn to another highway distraction, counting the cars that pass me wearing ribbon magnets and decals that display the same slogan: "Support Our Troops." I automatically read "Support Our Troops" as a proxy statement for "Support Our Commander in Chief."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 21, 2003
WASHINGTON - Now that the bombs are falling on Iraq, there can be no question that full support at home is due the American troops in the field, in the air and at sea implementing President Bush's policy to rid Iraq of weapons of mass destruction and end the reign of Saddam Hussein. Whatever one thinks of his decision to launch a preventive war at this time in the face of heavy disagreement outside our own borders, all Americans obviously must hope for a swift and successful outcome that will minimize casualties among our armed forces and those of our fighting allies, the British.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2003
Moments after President Bush told the nation that the United States had launched a military strike to "disarm Iraq, to free its people," Marylanders expressed both disgust and patriotism at the news, all the while wishing the standoff with Iraq had not come to war. From Owings Mills to Baltimore-Washington International Airport, the quiet, yet anxious hours that passed after 8 p.m. - Bush's deadline for Saddam Hussein and his family to flee or face war...
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 18, 2003
WASHINGTON - Closing ranks behind President Bush as the nation marches toward war with Iraq, senior Republicans and Democrats in Congress said yesterday that they would put aside deep and long-standing differences over the conflict to unite in support of U.S. troops about to be sent into combat. Even as some harshly criticized Bush for failing to win international support for an offensive against Saddam Hussein, top Democrats signaled that the time for challenging his course was coming swiftly to an end. Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan, the senior Democrat on the Armed Services Committee and one of his party's staunchest opponents of a war in Iraq without United Nations approval, said yesterday that he was finished clashing with Bush on Iraq.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A week after refusing to support NATO's air war in Yugoslavia, the House voted overwhelmingly yesterday to give President Clinton more than twice the $6 billion sum he had requested to pay for it.Though critical of Clinton's handling of the NATO campaign, Republican leaders took advantage of a chance to allocate extra money for military needs unrelated to Kosovo.All the money would come out of the Social Security trust fund and would not be subject to strict budget limits."The time is now to deter our enemies by bolstering our military," Rep. Tom DeLay of Texas, the House Republican whip, exhorted his colleagues.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2003
Moments after President Bush told the nation that the United States had launched a military strike to "disarm Iraq, to free its people," Marylanders expressed both disgust and patriotism at the news, all the while wishing the standoff with Iraq had not come to war. From Owings Mills to Baltimore-Washington International Airport, the quiet, yet anxious hours that passed after 8 p.m. - Bush's deadline for Saddam Hussein and his family to flee or face war...
NEWS
December 3, 1995
The pros and cons of troops in BosniaThe only decision worse than sending peace-keeping troops to Bosnia would be not sending them. The consequences of our failure to do so would be unthinkable. It would be better if no nation invaded another, if naked military aggression, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity were not committed and, when these atrocities did occur, it would have been better if Europe had forcefully stepped in and stopped them.But that's history. There is only one superpower and only one democracy with the moral power to stop the killing of innocent women and children in Bosnia.
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