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NEWS
By Capital News Service | February 2, 1995
Officials of Maryland's Child Support Enforcement Administration say the state should be able to collect fees for tracking down unpaid child support if a family can afford it.But activists -- including a Finksburg organization -- and some lawmakers disagreed Tuesday during House Judiciary Committee hearings on a bill that would bar the state from collecting fees for its child support enforcement services.Backers of the measure had a simple message: Don't take money from children and put it in the hands of government agencies.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
Maryland has a new child support enforcement director, a hire that comes about three months after the office was skewered in a legislative audit that said it failed to collect more than $1.7 billion in support over three years. Taking over the Child Support Enforcement Administration is Joseph J. DiPrimio, who ran Philadelphia's Family Court operations, including its child support enforcement programs, and is a retired court administrator of that city's courts. Secretary of Human Resources Ted Dallas said he brought in a new executive director in a push to take the state's child support enforcement from its middling position nationwide into the top 10 states within 18 months.
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NEWS
By DICK MENDEL | December 12, 1993
Like more than one hundred thousand Baltimore parents, Dawn Simmons is waiting.And waiting.And waiting.Dawn Simmons is waiting for her due, for simple justice. She's waiting for a much-needed financial cushion, a hand-hold to secure herself and her baby out of reach from the waiting jaws of poverty and welfare dependence.Dawn Simmons is waiting for child support.Nine hundred and twenty days have passed since she first crossed the threshold at the Eutaw Street headquarters of the Baltimore City Office of Child Support Enforcement.
NEWS
By Daniel L. Hatcher | November 4, 2008
The reality facing families in the child support system is far from simple. Demanding, as a recent Baltimore Sun editorial did, that parents "pay up or else" - and suggesting that the main thing the Child Support Enforcement Administration needs to do is use available tools and get tougher on "deadbeats" - could harm the very children the child support system is supposed to serve. It's important to remember that half of all unpaid child support is not even owed to children. When a struggling custodial mother applies for welfare cash assistance, the law requires her to establish a child support obligation against the father and simultaneously assign the resulting child support payments to the government.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2002
Gov. Parris N. Glendening has referred allegations made by a state official against Maximus Inc., the private company that runs Baltimore's child support enforcement program, to the state attorney general's office for criminal investigation. Carmen M. Shepard, deputy attorney general, confirmed yesterday that the referral had been made but said she could not discuss details of the investigation. Teresa L. Kaiser, the state's director of child support enforcement, wrote in a letter to lawmakers this month that she thought Maximus case files and records had been "manipulated in a manner that suggests wrongdoing."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2002
In an unusual move that bypassed her supervisors, an agency head in the state's Department of Human Resources has asked lawmakers to order an audit of the private company that administers child support enforcement in Baltimore, noting "grave concerns about the integrity" of the firm's work. Teresa L. Kaiser, executive director of the Child Support Enforcement Administration, said she believes an independent third party would find that Maximus Inc. had manipulated data on cases "in a manner that suggests wrongdoing."
NEWS
November 19, 1998
Bonnie J. Brereton, a former Baltimore police officer, died Tuesday of lung cancer at home in Swoope, Va. She was 50.She joined the Police Department in 1978 and left after 11 years to become an inmate counselor at Augusta (Va.) Correctional Center. Since 1994, she had been a support enforcement specialist for the Virginia Division of Child Support Enforcement.Born in Pasadena, Ms. Brereton graduated from Glen Burnie High School and earned a bachelor's degree in business administration from the University of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1997
A former Westminster-area man who failed to pay child support for his three children between November 1995 and November 1996 was placed on five years' probation after pleading guilty in Carroll County Circuit Court yesterday.According to the terms of the plea arrangement, Daniel D. Taylor, 34, of Baltimore, was given a three-year suspended prison sentence and ordered to pay $105 child support and $95 weekly toward arrears of nearly $23,700, on condition that the defendant immediately pay $1,000 and sign over a $4,000 bond to the Carroll County Bureau of Support Enforcement.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | October 17, 2008
The state Department of Human Resources has been underusing tools available to collect $1.57 billion in unpaid child support from deadbeat parents in nearly 200,000 cases, according to a legislative audit released yesterday. For example, the department's Child Support Enforcement Administration did not use its ability to have the occupational licenses of delinquent parents suspended, did not always collect and record their Social Security numbers and did not fully use automated techniques to identify and seize their bank accounts, the audit said.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff Writer | January 28, 1995
SUITLAND -- In a room filled with adoptive parents and their children, Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday portrayed himself as strongly committed to abortion alternatives.Mr. Glendening highlighted a handful of programs, ranging from family counseling to child support enforcement, that he intends to upgrade to aid families who choose to raise children.The announcement was clearly intended to blunt criticism the governor is receiving for proposing last week to loosen restrictions on abortions for Medicaid recipients.
NEWS
October 27, 2008
A state legislative audit has found that the Child Support Enforcement Administration is owed $1.5 billion in unpaid child support payments. That sounds like a lot of money - and a lot of deadbeat dads - until you realize the figure includes the cumulative unpaid child support since the agency began keeping records in the 1974. Much of the debt still on the books was incurred by absent parents who have long since died or disappeared; the state's chief auditor estimates that only about half of it would be considered collectible today.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | October 22, 2008
Maryland Secretary of Human Resources Brenda Donald told lawmakers yesterday that her agency is doing a better job of using a new computer program to keep track of children in state care. At a General Assembly Joint Audit Committee meeting, Donald said that a recent audit documenting problems with "Chessie" - the Children's Electronic Social Services Information Exchange - "really is old news." Social services employees have entered data from 90 percent of foster care and abuse and neglect investigations, Donald said.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | October 17, 2008
The state Department of Human Resources has been underusing tools available to collect $1.57 billion in unpaid child support from deadbeat parents in nearly 200,000 cases, according to a legislative audit released yesterday. For example, the department's Child Support Enforcement Administration did not use its ability to have the occupational licenses of delinquent parents suspended, did not always collect and record their Social Security numbers and did not fully use automated techniques to identify and seize their bank accounts, the audit said.
NEWS
By MIKE MCCORMICK AND GLENN SACKS | August 20, 2006
The zeal to enforce child-support payments in the wake of the 1996 welfare reforms created an unexpected group of victims: men forced to pay 18 years of support for children who are not theirs - children who, in many cases, they've never even met. Writing in the American Bar Association's Family Law Quarterly, Washington attorney Ronald K. Henry details how this problem developed, and proposes some common-sense solutions. The problem is relatively new, and stems in large part from the federal Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act of 1996, which restructured the welfare system.
NEWS
February 7, 2006
The heated debates during the crafting of the 1996 welfare reform law were memorable for one point of agreement between those on opposite sides of the issue. If welfare mothers were being asked to be more responsible for their children's economic well-being, both sides concurred, then absentee dads were fair game, too. Get the bums to pay child support, the thinking went, and the welfare rolls would shrink. Within the first four years of passage of the law, the rolls did shrink and the number of welfare cases closed because of child support collected increased by 56 percent, according to the U.S. Department of Heath and Human Services Child support collection rates have been rising ever since, from $12 billion to $22 billion since the law was passed.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2005
Martin Hall says there are two reasons he's taking steps to start paying the $16,725 in back child support he owes: his newfound faith and his mother. Hall, who has a 7-year-old son with a former girlfriend, became a Jehovah's Witness in June. The Scripture, he says, instructs a man to "take care of his household." Meanwhile, his mother sent him an e-mail about a two-week statewide amnesty program to help parents pay up. "Some things you take even more seriously as you get older," said Hall, who is 37 and unemployed.
NEWS
October 27, 2008
A state legislative audit has found that the Child Support Enforcement Administration is owed $1.5 billion in unpaid child support payments. That sounds like a lot of money - and a lot of deadbeat dads - until you realize the figure includes the cumulative unpaid child support since the agency began keeping records in the 1974. Much of the debt still on the books was incurred by absent parents who have long since died or disappeared; the state's chief auditor estimates that only about half of it would be considered collectible today.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1998
The Carroll County Sheriff's Office hopes to turn a loss of about $32,000 in federal money for child support enforcement into a $200,000 gain, and deadbeat parents will be the losers.Maryland sheriff's departments are compensated by the federal Office of Child Support Enforcement for serving child support summonses and court-ordered arrest warrants under which deadbeat parents are apprehended.The federal government had been paying $30 for each child support summons and $245 for each arrest warrant.
NEWS
August 1, 2004
Parents who have fallen behind on child support and would like to work out payments without fear of arrest can take advantage of a two-week amnesty program, starting tomorrow, offered by the Anne Arundel County Office of Child Support Enforcement. The amnesty is open to people who have an outstanding warrant connected to a failure to pay support, are about to have a driver's license suspended for nonsupport or have fallen behind in payments, said Pat Feeney, director of the child-support office.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2004
The Baltimore County justice system is working to track down more "deadbeat" fathers and mothers and is pushing for new ways to collect the nearly $30 million they owe in child support to county parents. County Sheriff R. Jay Fisher's deputies are serving more nonsupport warrants than ever before. Prosecutors have started charging nonpaying parents criminally. And judges and other county officials are trying to secure federal funding for a program that would meld job training with strict child support enforcement.
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