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NEWS
October 21, 1993
The Cancer Resource and Support Center (CaRES) at 8055 Ritchie Highway, Suite 101 in the Patriots Plaza Shopping Center, holds an open house from noon to 4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Patients, their families, friends and anyone else may tour the facility with one of the CaRES hosts to learn about the variety of support services available at CaRES.Every month, CaRES sponsors lectures by medical and career professionals.The next scheduled speaker is Jean Tate, a registered nurse who specializes in therapeutic massage.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore is organizing to bring LGBT baseball fans together at Oriole Park at Camden Yards this summer. "Baltimore is a town that really comes together in the name of its sports teams. Whether you identify within the LGBT spectrum or not, we can all agree that when it comes down to it, we're all rooting for the same team," said Kelly Neel, the GLCCB's deputy executive director, in a statement. "This summer we are hoping to expand on that sense of unity by bringing LGBT Oriole's Outings to Camden Yards.
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NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | January 2, 1994
The YWCA of Greater Baltimore and the Susquehanna Region Private Industry Council have received $125,500 to create a Family Support Center at the Aberdeen Community Services Building.The Friends of the Family grant will be used to establish a setting where teen-age mothers can learn parenting skills and gain access to a range of support services that play a part in raising healthy children.The Baltimore-based Friends of the Family is a private, nonprofit organization that raises money through state grants and private sources to assist families with children under age 4. It supports 19 centers throughout the state, including seven in Baltimore City, and offers them technical assistance and evaluations.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2011
Ulysses Aiken, a native Annapolitan, found himself homeless after losing his job as a professional boxing trainer. He ended up at the Light House Homeless Prevention and Support Center — Anne Arundel County's only shelter open to adults and children year round. There for four months earlier this year, Aiken, 54, called his stay "a nightmare" and said he was kicked out of the shelter without cause. Aiken says he is one of eight former residents who have filed complaints with the county Human Relations Commission in recent weeks, alleging that a senior staff member bullied and harassed residents.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | January 5, 1993
In a perfect world, the Young Family Support Center in Essex would have had a grand opening, but the needs of the real world leave no time for celebrating.The storefront in a brick, strip shopping center in the 200 block of Back River Neck Road doesn't even have a sign. But that's OK. People have been coming to the center since before the spackle dried.The center is the first of its kind in Baltimore County. It is supported by a $170,000 grant from Friends of the Family Inc., which funds five similar centers in Baltimore and several others around the state.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | September 29, 1992
At a time when a lot of politicians are talking about "family values" and "the disintegration of the family," a small group of people in West County is quietly doing something about it.Next week, the YWCA West County Family Support Center -- a coordinated effort of county and state agencies -- will open at 8379 Piney Orchard Road in Odenton. The center's goal is to provide a myriad of services to young families, many of whom have had difficulty getting the support they need."There's just not much in the way of services in West County," said center director Margurite Askew.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2003
At the Park Heights Family Support Center, parents study for the GED test, learn to cook and sew, and fill out resumes. Over the past few months, they've acquired a more unexpected skill: Lobbying. Armed with strollers, bottles and lively children, the clients of this center and 26 others around the state have descended on Annapolis to try to persuade Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to reverse a 26 percent cut in state funding for the support centers, which offer child care while parents are trying to improve their prospects in work and life.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2008
The campaign to build a support center for Annapolis cancer patients moved a step closer to reality with the donation of land three miles from Anne Arundel Medical Center. Janet Richardson-Pearson, president of Katherine Properties Inc., set aside 2 acres from a 70-acre property that she plans to develop for commercial use. The Annapolis Wellness House would be built on Crystal Spring Farm beside Mas Que Farm, home of the Chesapeake Dressage Institute, which Richardson-Pearson founded.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1997
Born two blocks from Bon Secours Hospital in 1922, Sister Urban Auer, a member of the Sisters of Bon Secours, easily ticks off what used to be in the old neighborhood: factories, corner stores, churches and, oh yes, lots of babies."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1997
Tanesha Scott, a 20-year-old mother of two, represents the promise -- and challenges -- facing clients at the Young Parent Support Center in Essex.Four days a week, Scott visits the office on Back River Neck Road for math and writing classes, while her 6-month-old son, Tyreek, stays in the center's gaily decorated child care center and her 4-year-old attends pre-kindergarten at nearby Mars Estates Elementary School.Her family is among 80 being served by the Essex operation, which puts day care, child development, adult education and other support services under one roof to help move young mothers off welfare and into the work world.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2010
Disagreements with his family forced Martise Stewart from his home. And without anywhere to go, he ended up sleeping in a wooded area in Odenton. With colder weather approaching, Stewart, who is unemployed, made his way to the Light House Shelter in Annapolis. "They're helping me get my resume together," said Stewart, 29. "I've only been there two weeks so I'm getting myself together rapidly. " Beginning today, Light House residents, including Stewart, will start moving into a new, $8.3 million building — called the Light House Homeless Prevention and Support Center — which will greatly expand the number of clients and the services offered to serve the county's growing homeless population.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | March 1, 2009
The Annapolis city council passed a bill waiving more than $120,000 in city fees for a homeless-prevention center, despite opposition from some council members who said the current budget won't allow such a hefty waiver. Although supporters of the Light House Homeless Prevention Support Center, scheduled to begin construction in July, asked that about $210,000 be waived, Ward 1 Alderman Richard Israel proposed an amendment at Monday's council meeting that deducted the capital facility assessment fees, which are paid over a 30-year period.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | November 24, 2008
After 25 years, a Baltimore organization that once attracted international acclaim for its efforts to help people with AIDS is set to close its doors for good. Even now, as the Health Education Resource Organization prepares to shut down Wednesday, people from all across Baltimore keep making their way to the group's Maryland Avenue building to find assistance, and some local leaders are begging the city to do more to save its oldest and largest HIV and AIDS service provider.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2008
The campaign to build a support center for Annapolis cancer patients moved a step closer to reality with the donation of land three miles from Anne Arundel Medical Center. Janet Richardson-Pearson, president of Katherine Properties Inc., set aside 2 acres from a 70-acre property that she plans to develop for commercial use. The Annapolis Wellness House would be built on Crystal Spring Farm beside Mas Que Farm, home of the Chesapeake Dressage Institute, which Richardson-Pearson founded.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun reporter | December 18, 2007
In the sunny playroom of the Park Heights Family Support Center, Ta-Niya Campbell, a wobbly 13-month-year old with pink and white beads in her braids, wants to join a group of toddlers, but isn't quite steady enough. Just several weeks ago, though, Ta-Niya wasn't walking at all. Since she and her mother, Tywanda Palmer, arrived at the center in October, they've both made strides toward self-sufficiency. "She started walking when she came," Palmer, 19, says. Palmer, herself, is working toward her GED and the self-esteem required for raising a happy, healthy child.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,sun reporter | October 21, 2007
Surveying the flood-damaged Echo House last week, contractors paused when they reached the second story: ruined floors pockmarked with craters, tangles of wires where the ceilings had caved in and crumbling walls. "This is where it really got it," said Kevin Maggio, a restoration expert. "No, this is only the second-worst floor," said Janice Lockwood, executive director of Echo House, a center in West Baltimore that provides a food pantry for the neighborhood, after-school programs for 80 children and treatment and counseling for hundreds of drug addicts.
NEWS
December 5, 1994
At a time when the political talk is about reforming the welfare system and scaling back government aid to teen-age mothers, a center is opening in Annapolis with a clear vision of how to help young families. At the Family Support Center on West Street, the emphasis is on prevention, local management and cooperation between public and private initiatives.Located on the edge of one of the state capital's poorest neighborhoods, the Family Support Center brings together a variety of programs to help young parents who have children under the age of 3. Services are provided for free without regard to income.
NEWS
December 6, 2006
Senior center picks holiday project The O'Malley Senior Center, 1275 Odenton Road in Odenton, is sponsoring the West County Family Support Center for its holiday giving project. The target population at the support center is children to age 3 and their families who are facing hardships. Donations may be brought to the O'Malley Center office. Needed are diapers, wipes, infant toys, washcloths, blankets, preschool-age puzzles, plastic cups and clothing for boys and girls. 410-222-6227.
NEWS
December 13, 2006
Senior center picks holiday project The O'Malley Senior Center, 1275 Odenton Road in Odenton, is sponsoring the West County Family Support Center for its holiday giving project. The target population at the support center is children to age 3 and their families who are facing hardships. Donations may be brought to the O'Malley center office. Needed are diapers, wipes, infant toys, washcloths, blankets, preschool-age puzzles, plastic cups and clothing for boys and girls. 410-222-6227.
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