Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSupport Abortion
IN THE NEWS

Support Abortion

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | January 9, 1991
Countians will join a rally and candlelight march to the State Housein Annapolis Monday to support anti-abortion legislation."We're asking all pro-life countians to show our new senator and delegates how we feel about the abortion bills they will be voting on," said PatFisher of Finksburg.Marchers will leave Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium at 6:30 p.m. and proceed to the State House, where legislators who oppose abortion will present abortion bills for this session.Participants also will hear speeches, sing and pray, said Maria DeCesare, a counselorfor Birthright, a Westminster organization that counsels pregnant women in non-abortion options.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 19, 2013
The Maryland legislature recently voted to abolish capital punishment in the state, making Maryland the sixth state in the last six years to eliminate the death penalty. The primary argument for repealing the law is that our justice system is imperfect and it's possible an innocent person could be condemned. Indeed, anti-death penalty activists presented Kirk Bloodsworth, a former death-row inmate, convicted of the 1984 rape and murder of a 9-year-old girl. His conviction was overturned on appeal after the court found the prosecution had withheld exculpatory evidence from the defense.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1998
The House of Delegates voted yesterday not to pay for abortions for girls covered under the governor's proposed health insurance program for children of the working poor.The action sets up a likely clash with the Senate, which rejected the same proposal last week.Yesterday's 70-65 vote in the House came on an amendment to the state budget, giving anti-abortion legislators a victory a week after they failed to get similar language in the bill creating the children's health program.While the emotionally debated issue represents an important point of policy for both sides, the restriction would involve relatively few abortions.
NEWS
By Maddie Walz | September 27, 2011
As I pulled into the front parking lot of Bel Air High School about 7 a.m. on Thursday, two men caught my eye. They were standing on the corner adjacent to the entrance to the school parking lot on Kenmore Avenue. Friday morning, the men were back, this time standing on the corner of Kenmore Avenue and Bobcat Drive. The men were holding up large signs in protest against abortion. Pro-life supporters have often been seen before around the town of Bel Air. They hold up signs displaying text and images opposing abortion.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky | November 1, 1990
Gov. William Donald Schaefer, who has pledged to veto legislation that restricts the right to abortion, and Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., a longtime advocate of abortion rights, yesterday won the endorsement of Choice PAC, a group dedicated to electing candidates who favor keeping abortion legal.Since its formation in May, Choice PAC has raised about $40,000 for legislative candidates who support abortion rights. This week, the group decided to make endorsements in the governor's and attorney general's races as well.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The 20th anniversary of the Roe vs. Wade decision legalizing abortion did not pass quietly here. As expected, the city was overrun with opponents of abortion rights to remind everyone how complex and contentious this issue has been -- and probably will continue to be for another generation of Americans.The only thing different about this year's march is that the "right-to-life" demonstrators, as they characterize themselves, didn't have a friend and ally in the White House for the first time in 12 years.
NEWS
By Maddie Walz | September 27, 2011
As I pulled into the front parking lot of Bel Air High School about 7 a.m. on Thursday, two men caught my eye. They were standing on the corner adjacent to the entrance to the school parking lot on Kenmore Avenue. Friday morning, the men were back, this time standing on the corner of Kenmore Avenue and Bobcat Drive. The men were holding up large signs in protest against abortion. Pro-life supporters have often been seen before around the town of Bel Air. They hold up signs displaying text and images opposing abortion.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 10, 1995
WASHINGTON -- For Republicans hoping to soften the party's strict stance against abortion, this weekend's big gathering of religious conservatives provided little in the way of encouragement.As the GOP presidential contenders courted members of the Christian Coalition, they went out of their way to demonstrate the strength of their anti-abortion ardor.Sen. Phil Gramm set the tone at Friday's opening session of the coalition's Road to Victory conference. He waved a copy of a pledge declaring that "the unborn child has a fundamental individual right to life which cannot be infringed" and challenged Bob Dole to join him in signing it.Mr.
NEWS
By Maggie Gallagher | September 12, 1995
THE VOICE from the airwaves was anonymous -- it could have been Everyman, or in this case every woman distressed about lingering adultery charges against presidents Bill Clinton and John F. Kennedy and Gary Hart: "We've got to stop obsessing about the private affairs of politicians."What about Bob Packwood?"Oh," she says, "that's different. That's really bad."Suddenly I was transfixed. That's it, I thought, the new emerging morality in a nutshell: What you do to your wife doesn't matter; it's how you treat your employees that counts.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Thomas W. Waldron contributed to this article | January 13, 1996
With his legislative agenda overflowing with tough issues, Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced yesterday that he will not attempt to expand public funding of abortions for poor women.The decision is an about-face for the governor, who last year pledged to try to lift the state's restrictions on Medicaid-funded abortions in each General Assembly session until he left office.Yesterday, he acknowledged that he did not have enough votes in the House of Delegates to make such a change during the 1996 General Assembly session.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 29, 2004
NEW YORK - Thousands of abortion-rights supporters marched over the Brooklyn Bridge yesterday in what organizers called the largest demonstration devoted to that issue in New York in three decades. The protest, which opened a third day of demonstrations aimed at the Republican National Convention, occurred as hundreds of bicycle-riding protesters who were arrested a night earlier were arraigned in a Manhattan court, many having been held on minor charges for many hours before being released.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 28, 2001
ORANGE FARM, South Africa - The young boys in oversized rubber boots kick up their heels, stomp their feet and slap the sides of their boots like drums. They move faster and faster - kicking, stomping and slapping - until the rhythm sounds like a locomotive picking up speed. Then they start singing. Not about the hardships of mining - as is the tradition for gumboot dancers in South Africa - but about the dangers of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases. At the Planned Parenthood Association of South Africa's youth center in this black township outside Johannesburg, the line between sex education and recreation is often blurred.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Greg Garland and Michael Dresser and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF rTC Sun staff writer Chris Guy contributed to this article | October 6, 1998
Praising Gov. Parris N. Glendening for his support of abortion rights, a coalition of women's groups endorsed his re-election bid yesterday and predicted Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey will try to roll back those rights if she wins the election.Sauerbrey, meanwhile, received a warm reception from a state employees' group for her promises of improved benefits and "salary increases that at the very least keep up with inflation."With the Nov. 3 election less than a month away, Sauerbrey and Glendening moved to sew up the support of organizations with deep-seated grievances against the other candidate.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Craig Timberg and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1998
Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey has reached across ideological lines to pick Richard D. Bennett, a former U.S. attorney popular with GOP moderates, to be her running mate in her bid for governor, sources said last night.In choosing Bennett, 50, she passed on Paul H. Rappaport -- her 1994 running mate favored by many grass-roots supporters -- and Prince George's County GOP Chairman Michael Steele, an African-American who might have bolstered her efforts to reach out to black voters.Bennett differs from the 60-year-old Sauerbrey on some key issues, supporting abortion rights and some gun control.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1998
The House of Delegates voted yesterday not to pay for abortions for girls covered under the governor's proposed health insurance program for children of the working poor.The action sets up a likely clash with the Senate, which rejected the same proposal last week.Yesterday's 70-65 vote in the House came on an amendment to the state budget, giving anti-abortion legislators a victory a week after they failed to get similar language in the bill creating the children's health program.While the emotionally debated issue represents an important point of policy for both sides, the restriction would involve relatively few abortions.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Thomas W. Waldron contributed to this article | January 13, 1996
With his legislative agenda overflowing with tough issues, Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced yesterday that he will not attempt to expand public funding of abortions for poor women.The decision is an about-face for the governor, who last year pledged to try to lift the state's restrictions on Medicaid-funded abortions in each General Assembly session until he left office.Yesterday, he acknowledged that he did not have enough votes in the House of Delegates to make such a change during the 1996 General Assembly session.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | June 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- With President Clinton appearing to waver on his pledge to include abortion in health care reform, supporters and opponents of abortion rights are waging an all-out campaign over government funding of abortions that could have its first critical test this week.Both sides say that the House vote on whether government should pay for abortions for poor women will give one side crucial momentum for the battle later this year over whether national health care reform will cover abortions.
NEWS
By Timothy M. Phelps and Timothy M. Phelps,Newsday | April 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A majority of Americans, when asked, say they support Roe vs. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court abortion decision that has led to virtual guerrilla warfare over the meaning of life.But an even larger majority of Americans say in poll after poll that they endorse a different Supreme Court decision last year that upheld Roe vs. Wade but also upheld the states' right to place restrictions on abortion.That consensus, the product of 20 years of legal wrangles and the anguish of three essentially anti-abortion Supreme Court justices, is about to be challenged by the Clinton administration and the Democratic leadership in Congress.
NEWS
By Maggie Gallagher | September 12, 1995
THE VOICE from the airwaves was anonymous -- it could have been Everyman, or in this case every woman distressed about lingering adultery charges against presidents Bill Clinton and John F. Kennedy and Gary Hart: "We've got to stop obsessing about the private affairs of politicians."What about Bob Packwood?"Oh," she says, "that's different. That's really bad."Suddenly I was transfixed. That's it, I thought, the new emerging morality in a nutshell: What you do to your wife doesn't matter; it's how you treat your employees that counts.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 10, 1995
WASHINGTON -- For Republicans hoping to soften the party's strict stance against abortion, this weekend's big gathering of religious conservatives provided little in the way of encouragement.As the GOP presidential contenders courted members of the Christian Coalition, they went out of their way to demonstrate the strength of their anti-abortion ardor.Sen. Phil Gramm set the tone at Friday's opening session of the coalition's Road to Victory conference. He waved a copy of a pledge declaring that "the unborn child has a fundamental individual right to life which cannot be infringed" and challenged Bob Dole to join him in signing it.Mr.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.