Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSupply Management
IN THE NEWS

Supply Management

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 6, 2005
NEW YORK - U.S. services expanded in December at the fastest pace in five months, capping a record year for the biggest part of the economy, a private survey showed yesterday. The Institute for Supply Management's index of nonmanufacturing companies, which includes retailers, banks and airlines, rose to 63.1 from 61.3. The increase was the third straight, and the average of 62.5 for 2004 is the highest since the survey began in 1997. Readings higher than 50 signify growth. "I'm quite positive about the general direction of the economy," said Paul H. O'Neill, the former Treasury secretary and an adviser to Blackstone Group LP, manager of the world's largest buyout fund.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 2, 2007
Tuesday Reports -- July construction spending; August Institute for Supply Management manufacturing index; August vehicle sales Earnings -- Donaldson Co.; Finisar Corp.; Guess Inc. Wednesday Report -- Federal Reserve beige book Earnings -- ADC Telecommunications Inc.; Martek Biosciences Corp.; Sycamore Networks Inc. Thursday Reports -- Second-quarter productivity; Institute for Supply Management services index; weekly initial jobless claims Earnings -- America's Car-Mart Inc.; Campbell Soup Co.; Cascade Corp.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 30, 2004
Tuesday * Construction spending for April * Institute for Supply Management index for May Wednesday * Auto and truck sales for May Earnings: Albertson's Thursday * Revised non-farm productivity report for first quarter * Institute for Supply Management services report for May * Factory orders for April Earnings: Elizabeth Arden, Mandalay Resort Friday * Unemployment and payroll report for May
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,Chicago Tribune | December 6, 2006
Two economic reports yesterday highlighted the gap that is opening between the nation's stagnating manufacturing segment and the service sector, which continues to show unexpected zip. "The service sector is not as weak as expected and is performing vastly better than the manufacturing sector," said Wachovia economist Sam Bullard. Fueled in part by softening demand from the automotive and housing industries, as well as a downward swing in the often-volatile timing of jet-aircraft sales, orders placed with U.S. factories dropped a hefty 4.7 percent in October, the Commerce Department reported.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 6, 2004
NEW YORK -- A gauge of U.S. service industries unexpectedly jumped to a record last month as orders and employment climbed, and a survey of chief executive officers found their confidence in the economy is the highest in more than 20 years. The Institute for Supply Management's index of financial services, construction, retail and other nonmanufacturing enterprises rose to 65.8 last month from 60.8 the month before, exceeding the previous record of 65.7 in January. Readings higher than 50 indicate expansion.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 4, 2005
NEW YORK - U.S. manufacturing grew at a quicker pace in December as more factories reported a rise in orders and exports, a sign the economy strengthened heading into 2005. The Institute for Supply Management said yesterday that its purchasing managers index of factory orders rose to 58.6, from 57.8 in November, reaching the highest point since August. The gauge has shown expansion - marked by readings greater than 50 - since June 2003. For the year, the factory orders index averaged 60.5 - the highest yearly average since 65.9 in 1973.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - U.S. service industries expanded in October at the fastest pace in three months and more companies said they were hiring, evidence the economy is strengthening as President Bush celebrates his re-election. "This certainly points to health in the economy," said Stephen Stanley, chief economist at RBS Greenwich Capital Management in Greenwich, Conn. The Institute for Supply Management's measure of financial services, construction, retail and other nonmanufacturing enterprises rose more than forecast to 59.8 from September's 56.7.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2002
The manufacturing sector, generally considered on the upswing after a long slump, seems to be losing momentum and could face rough going over the next few months, a recent report warns. And there are indications that many industries remain depressed. The Institute for Supply Management reported last week that while manufacturing expanded last month for the seventh straight month, new orders contracted. The group's Purchasing Managers Index stood at 50.5 percent. That reading, though above 50, which indicates growth, was below many economists' expectations and quite a bit lower than readings earlier in the year.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,Chicago Tribune | December 6, 2006
Two economic reports yesterday highlighted the gap that is opening between the nation's stagnating manufacturing segment and the service sector, which continues to show unexpected zip. "The service sector is not as weak as expected and is performing vastly better than the manufacturing sector," said Wachovia economist Sam Bullard. Fueled in part by softening demand from the automotive and housing industries, as well as a downward swing in the often-volatile timing of jet-aircraft sales, orders placed with U.S. factories dropped a hefty 4.7 percent in October, the Commerce Department reported.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 6, 2005
NEW YORK - U.S. services expanded in December at the fastest pace in five months, capping a record year for the biggest part of the economy, a private survey showed yesterday. The Institute for Supply Management's index of nonmanufacturing companies, which includes retailers, banks and airlines, rose to 63.1 from 61.3. The increase was the third straight, and the average of 62.5 for 2004 is the highest since the survey began in 1997. Readings higher than 50 signify growth. "I'm quite positive about the general direction of the economy," said Paul H. O'Neill, the former Treasury secretary and an adviser to Blackstone Group LP, manager of the world's largest buyout fund.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 4, 2005
NEW YORK - U.S. manufacturing grew at a quicker pace in December as more factories reported a rise in orders and exports, a sign the economy strengthened heading into 2005. The Institute for Supply Management said yesterday that its purchasing managers index of factory orders rose to 58.6, from 57.8 in November, reaching the highest point since August. The gauge has shown expansion - marked by readings greater than 50 - since June 2003. For the year, the factory orders index averaged 60.5 - the highest yearly average since 65.9 in 1973.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - U.S. service industries expanded in October at the fastest pace in three months and more companies said they were hiring, evidence the economy is strengthening as President Bush celebrates his re-election. "This certainly points to health in the economy," said Stephen Stanley, chief economist at RBS Greenwich Capital Management in Greenwich, Conn. The Institute for Supply Management's measure of financial services, construction, retail and other nonmanufacturing enterprises rose more than forecast to 59.8 from September's 56.7.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 6, 2004
NEW YORK -- A gauge of U.S. service industries unexpectedly jumped to a record last month as orders and employment climbed, and a survey of chief executive officers found their confidence in the economy is the highest in more than 20 years. The Institute for Supply Management's index of financial services, construction, retail and other nonmanufacturing enterprises rose to 65.8 last month from 60.8 the month before, exceeding the previous record of 65.7 in January. Readings higher than 50 indicate expansion.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2002
The manufacturing sector, generally considered on the upswing after a long slump, seems to be losing momentum and could face rough going over the next few months, a recent report warns. And there are indications that many industries remain depressed. The Institute for Supply Management reported last week that while manufacturing expanded last month for the seventh straight month, new orders contracted. The group's Purchasing Managers Index stood at 50.5 percent. That reading, though above 50, which indicates growth, was below many economists' expectations and quite a bit lower than readings earlier in the year.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.