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Supply And Demand

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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 31, 1999
BOSTON -- It would be nice to think of this as a simple problem of supply and demand. A test case for Economics 101. A problem for the marketplace.Over here we have 66,000 potential customers on a waiting list. Over there we have 5,500 products. How do you satisfy all these customers? Where's the supply to meet the demand?But we aren't talking about a shortage of Star Wars tickets or Beanie Babies. We are talking about a shortage of human organs. We are talking about people who die waiting for a liver or a heart or a lung.
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NEWS
January 11, 2014
I second Del. Dan K. Morhaim's concern about shortages of basic drugs ( "Medication crisis," Jan. 5). An example is the inexpensive yet effective drug called atropine. I have used this medication for years, both in hospitals and in my private office, to treat a common problem. Some simple procedures, such as drawing blood or inserting an IUD, can cause a reaction resulting in slow pulse and low blood pressure, often with fainting and sometimes seizures. This reaction can be blocked or easily reversed with a small dose of atropine.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel | March 13, 2009
The proposal to set up a Land Bank Authority for Baltimore may well, as Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration contends, streamline the sale of vacant city-owned property. But it is unlikely that the mere creation of the entity would substantially reduce Baltimore's backlog of abandoned houses and empty lots. That's because the fundamental reasons there continue to be so many vacant properties in the city - about 30,000, a third of them city-owned - are economic, not bureaucratic. Indeed, the very existence of vacant properties can be traced to the most basic of economic principles: supply and demand.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
Kristina and Anthony Pannone spent eight months looking for a house. The ones they liked kept getting snapped up, until they finally topped three other would-be buyers for a place in Columbia — by offering $5,100 more than the asking price. Their experience is becoming more common in the Baltimore area for a simple reason: diminishing choices. In recent months, the supply of homes for sale in the region has been at its lowest level since the housing-bubble years of the mid-2000s, according to a Baltimore Sun analysis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2011
Rule # 2: Most good restaurants don’t need social deals, they already have the right menu prices. If their prices are off, they adjust them according to supply and demand.  Check out Ryan Sutton's blazing hot site, The Bad Deal , in which he post about the worst offerings of the social deal websites. Now, he's put together Eight Bad Deal Rules.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2010
Retail gasoline prices have jumped sharply over the past week, prompting worries that energy prices could slow the economic recovery. The average price of a gallon of regular gasoline jumped 8.6 cents to $2.751 a gallon, according to the federal government's weekly survey of filling stations around the U.S. Analysts said gasoline prices were rising sharply at a time when most indicators of supply and demand were headed in the opposite direction....
NEWS
January 5, 1993
SOMEONE in the U.S. Marines has remembered his introductory economics course: the law of supply and demand. If food is worth killing over in Somalia because it is scarce, he reasoned, why not flood the market? That would drive down the value of food supplies, and the warlords would no longer have any incentive to fight over it.The Marines have not yet had the chance to test this theory: still too much unprotected territory and too little food in Somalia. When they do, it will doubtless prove not to be quite that simple.
NEWS
By Tom Moriarty | July 29, 2008
Supply and demand - the yin and yang of the modern world, the nemesis of Homo economicus, the most basic principle in all of economics - is really quite easy to grasp. When demand is high or supply is tight, prices go up. When demand is low or supply is plentiful, prices go down. That's why the Hannah Montana Non-Stop Dance Party CD will cost you $14.99 on Amazon, while my band's latest offering, Will Rock for Food, is free. The same basic principles are behind the high price of oil. Surging demand in emerging markets such as India and China have squeezed supplies, leaving less of the stuff to go around.
EXPLORE
July 6, 2011
A point worth noting in all of this is that key parts of the real estate boom were driven by government policy, and the modest recovery in the market that was seen late last year and early in 2011 dried up when a government incentive program for homebuyers expired. While government policy certainly isn't the answer to every problem, in this case, we have learned there are right and wrong ways for the government to promote home ownership and we're not doing ourselves any favors by shutting down the whole operation because parts of it were foolish and unsuccessful.
NEWS
December 9, 1994
Gasoline prices for Marylanders jumped at least 6 cents per gallon in the past month. More than half of that increase stemmed from government rules to reduce auto-caused air pollution. New Year's Day will bring more bad news -- another expected price increase that could be as much as a dime a gallon -- from further federal requirements.Nigerian oilworker strikes, Middle East jitters and domestic pipeline ruptures have already pushed up the price in Maryland by another 10 cents over the past six months.
NEWS
March 2, 2013
A recent article ("Pumping Up the Price" Feb. 26) on gasoline prices should make it clear to readers that the price of gasoline is no longer the result of inefficient fuel use or too much demand. Unfortunately the focus of the article was evidently on the impact of the recent gasoline price hikes to Marylanders and their corresponding life choices. However, the article gave scant attention to the cause for these rapid-fire price hikes. Oh yes, we are told temporary price hikes are expected in the spring when refineries switch to "more environmentally friendly" formulas.
EXPLORE
September 27, 2011
Business and community interests don't always see eye-to-eye, but in a tight-knit area such as Towson, the people we do business with are often those who make their lives, as well as their living, here. Even business owners who don't fall into that category at least recognize that when the community is healthy, active and prosperous, they are, too. That's why it's equal parts admirable and logical that the Towson business community is coming to the aid of the Assistance Centers of Towson Churches.
EXPLORE
July 6, 2011
A point worth noting in all of this is that key parts of the real estate boom were driven by government policy, and the modest recovery in the market that was seen late last year and early in 2011 dried up when a government incentive program for homebuyers expired. While government policy certainly isn't the answer to every problem, in this case, we have learned there are right and wrong ways for the government to promote home ownership and we're not doing ourselves any favors by shutting down the whole operation because parts of it were foolish and unsuccessful.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2011
Rule # 2: Most good restaurants don’t need social deals, they already have the right menu prices. If their prices are off, they adjust them according to supply and demand.  Check out Ryan Sutton's blazing hot site, The Bad Deal , in which he post about the worst offerings of the social deal websites. Now, he's put together Eight Bad Deal Rules.
NEWS
May 11, 2010
In explaining the unhealthy eating habits that have fostered widespread obesity and other health problems in the inner city, Baltimore faces a chicken-and-egg (or, perhaps more accurately, Chicken McNugget-and-Egg McMuffin) issue: Do people not choose healthy foods because they are unavailable, or are healthy foods unavailable because people choose unhealthy ones? It's probably some of both. Supermarkets followed affluent residents to the suburbs, and the corner markets and convenience stores that remain rarely stock fresh fruits and vegetables.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2010
Retail gasoline prices have jumped sharply over the past week, prompting worries that energy prices could slow the economic recovery. The average price of a gallon of regular gasoline jumped 8.6 cents to $2.751 a gallon, according to the federal government's weekly survey of filling stations around the U.S. Analysts said gasoline prices were rising sharply at a time when most indicators of supply and demand were headed in the opposite direction....
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 31, 2001
FIFTH-GRADERS at Clemens Crossing Elementary School learned about supply and demand, goods vs. services, and accounting practices in preparation for their Economics Fair held this month. Gifted and Talented Program resource teacher Nancy Kapp designed the curriculum, which encouraged the class to develop goods or services they would sell to other children in the school. "The students were so creative," Kapp said. "I was very impressed." The children were allowed to use any materials they had in developing their businesses, and they were limited to spending $5 on new materials.
NEWS
By Tom Moriarty | December 28, 2009
We thought we were so smart, the day our democracy was born. Finally, we had a system of government that looked to the people - to ourselves - for reasons we should do one thing and not another. Reasons we should vote for one candidate and not the other. Reasons why we should stay home or go to war, protect the rich or help the poor. The ancient Greeks had a word for what we made: They called it the polis, the body politic, the public space where we can figure out what we should do and why we should do it, where we should go and how we might get there, who we should know and who might lead us. The space where we can thrive, where we can live and where we can care for or hurt one another.
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