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By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
John Morris Crocker, former owner of a plumbing supply business on Maryland Avenue, died of kidney failure Sept. 23 at the Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson. The former Glen Arm resident was 95. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of E.M. Crocker, founder of a Maryland Avenue plumbing supply company, and Dorothy Laws Crocker, a homemaker. He was a graduate of the Landon Academy in Bethesda, where he was a top scorer on its basketball team and quarterback of the football team.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
John Morris Crocker, former owner of a plumbing supply business on Maryland Avenue, died of kidney failure Sept. 23 at the Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson. The former Glen Arm resident was 95. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of E.M. Crocker, founder of a Maryland Avenue plumbing supply company, and Dorothy Laws Crocker, a homemaker. He was a graduate of the Landon Academy in Bethesda, where he was a top scorer on its basketball team and quarterback of the football team.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | May 28, 2014
UPDATE:   More than 200 people lined up early this morning to grab a spot in line for a chance at a year's supply of Chick-fil-A. The 100 selected through a drawing to be held today will be setting up tents to camp out through Thursday morning, when they will be given their supply cards. Would you camp out for 24 hours in Canton for a free, one-year supply of Chick-fil-A meals? That's the prize going to the first 100 adult customers who line up by 6 a.m. Thursday, May 29, outside the city's first stand-alone Chick-fil-A, opening that day in Canton Crossing.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Under Armour will continue to supply uniforms to the University of Maryland's varsity teams under a 10-year extension deal announced Tuesday. The Baltimore-based sports brand will continue to design and supply game-day uniforms as well as footwear, apparel and equipment for training for all men's and women's varsity teams. "The University of Maryland is an integral part of Under Armour's history, culture and identity," Matt Mirchin, Under Armour's executive vice president of global marketing, said in the company's announcement.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | March 25, 2008
The Q: Last week, we tackled the definition of "gas delivery charge" on your Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. bill (the price the utility charges you to deliver your natural gas), and the complicated reason behind why the charge varies from month-to-month. We would explain it to you again, but it would take far too much space. Instead, we'll just tell you that our foray into utility billing explanations prompted H. Walter Townshend III to ask about Reliability Pricing Models (RPM). "As a chamber, we have put together electric purchasing cooperatives, collectively saving our members millions of dollars," said Townshend, president and chief executive of the Baltimore/Washington Corridor Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
June 7, 1991
The American Red Cross, throughout its lifetime one of the nation's most respected emergency relief services, is also one of its largest independent health agencies. Among other things, its 53 blood centers collect and process 1 million containers of blood products a month, half of the nation's blood supply. It is a vitally needed resource.But all has not been healthy in the 53 Red Cross blood centers. The worldwide AIDS epidemic caught blood bank officials everywhere flat-footed, precipitating a vociferous behind-the-scenes debate among doctors concerned about how to detect the insidious virus and stop its spread.
NEWS
August 2, 2005
William Boggs Edelen, a former owner and vice president of Stebbins-Anderson Co. and Saco Supply Co., died of congestive heart failure July 26 at a nursing home in Naples, Fla. He was 86. Mr. Edelen was born in Baltimore and raised on his family's Glen Arm farm. He graduated from Loyola High School in 1936 and earned a bachelor's degree in 1940 from Georgetown University, where he played varsity football and founded the ice hockey team. During World War II, Mr. Edelen served in Navy intelligence and spent the war years aboard five vessels.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | August 30, 2001
CHICAGO - It's been four months since a Peruvian fighter shot down a U.S. missionary plane wrongly suspected of smuggling drugs, and the Peruvian government is ready to stop wallowing in grief. It wants to get back to intercepting such flights, just as soon as it can persuade the United States to go along. Why? Because the interdiction effort, in its view, has been an enormous success. The amount of Peruvian land planted in coca, the stuff from which cocaine is made, has declined by 70 percent since 1995.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2002
Genevieve M. Nyborg, who owned an art supply store and was treasurer of a community theater, died of cancer Tuesday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. She was 84 and lived in Guilford. The former owner and president of Nyborg's Artist and Engineering Supplies at Charles and Hamilton streets in downtown Baltimore, she was also the treasurer of The Spotlighters, a St. Paul Street theater, for 38 years. Born Genevieve Morris in Baltimore and raised in Canton, she was a 1935 graduate of Eastern High School.
NEWS
April 20, 2008
The General Assembly's approval of the $2 billion settlement with Constellation Energy Group may have closed the books on stranded costs and other disputed elements of the state's nine-year-old deregulation effort, but it is hardly the last word on electricity. In the months ahead, it's clear some important questions must still be answered, including the most fundamental: Should Maryland reregulate energy supplies? First, however, there's the matter of making sure the state's electricity customers aren't facing brown-outs or other shortages in as little as three years - as some have warned.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
As music videos played on flat screen TVs overhead, Brendon Lee, 7, sank into a brown cushioned stool at Shoe City on Monday while his great-aunt poked the toe of the white Converse sneaker on his left foot. It was the right shoe but the wrong size. "Your toe is right there," said Evelyn Forby, as she waited for a store associate to check in the back for something larger. New shoes were the last thing on the list as the Baltimore resident wrapped up back-to-school shopping for the boy she's raised since he was a baby.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore | August 8, 2014
Howard County has a reputation of being one of the most affluent jurisdictions in the nation, but volunteers in a Columbia-based program say many families of public school students are struggling to make ends meet - particularly as their sons and daughters prepare to go back to school. Prepare for Success, a program that operates as a partnership of the county schools and the Community Action Council of Howard County, is working to alleviate some of the burden by providing school supplies to children in need.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
A rocket carrying 3,000 pounds of supplies for the International Space Station is scheduled to launch Friday afternoon, and should be visible across the mid-Atlantic. Orbital Sciences Corp. is slated to launch a Cygnus cargo spacecraft at 1:40 p.m. from NASA's Wallops Space Flight Facility on the Virginia portion of the Delmarva peninsula. Aboard the Antares rocket's payload will be provisions, spare parts and equipment for science experiments. One experiment on board involves deploying a flock of "nanosatellites" designed to take images of Earth, while others were designed through the Student Spaceflight Experiment Program, according to NASA.
NEWS
By Eric Schwaab and Michael Hirshfield | June 26, 2014
At the State Department's "Our Ocean" conference last week, President Barack Obama announced new plans to tackle seafood fraud and illegal fishing. Increased transparency and traceability of the seafood supply chain is a critical next step in sustaining fisheries management progress in the U.S. and abroad. Failure to fully address these problems will continue to undercut the progress that the U.S. and other nations have made to end overfishing and rebuild depleted fish stocks. According to a new study of the top U.S. seafood imports, an estimated 20 to 32 percent of the wild-caught seafood crossing our borders was found to have originated from illegal sources.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | May 28, 2014
UPDATE:   More than 200 people lined up early this morning to grab a spot in line for a chance at a year's supply of Chick-fil-A. The 100 selected through a drawing to be held today will be setting up tents to camp out through Thursday morning, when they will be given their supply cards. Would you camp out for 24 hours in Canton for a free, one-year supply of Chick-fil-A meals? That's the prize going to the first 100 adult customers who line up by 6 a.m. Thursday, May 29, outside the city's first stand-alone Chick-fil-A, opening that day in Canton Crossing.
NEWS
May 5, 2014
The Chesapeake Bay Blue Crab is an omnivore. If a favorite food like worms, plants or baby clams is unavailable, it switches to something else. Maryland's human denizens may want to seriously consider doing that same thing. That's because the latest news regarding one of Maryland's favorite seafood delicacies isn't good. For the second straight year, the bay's crab population is in decline, with the number of female crabs - the most critical factor for future reproduction - below what biologists regard as safe to maintain the current stock.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1996
A sugar-import increase approved this week will help to prevent supply problems that shut down Domino Sugar Corp.'s Baltimore plant for about a dozen days last year, plant officials said yesterday.Domino executives blamed raw-sugar import restrictions and crop problems for supply shortages that closed the factory temporarily.Now that the Agriculture Department has raised the import ceiling by another 28 percent, the plant should be able to avoid interruptions, said Paul Mirsky, chairman of North American and Australian operations for Tate & Lyle, a British concern that owns Domino.
NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | May 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In a process that will take months, if not years, Congress began to ponder whether taxpayers should continue subsidizing the Helium Fund, a program created in 1925 to ensure that America would never run short of the gas in the event of global blimp warfare.By that measure, the program has been a roaring success. The U.S. has accumulated a 176-year supply of the lighter-than-air element, along with $1.4 billion in debt. But the program has become an object of ridicule among fiscal analysts who call it a classic example of how government programs assume eternal life.
NEWS
By Jennifer Bodensiek | April 8, 2014
The Maryland legislature last week passed a 2015 budget, and it includes $12 million to help create jobs in Maryland's innovative biotech and life science sector. That's a smart use of resources. For lawmakers looking to put residents back to work, our state's high-tech sectors have been bright spots - especially our vanguard biotech industry, which accounts for more than 11 percent of the Maryland economy. In Baltimore, Emergent Technologies is now staffing 200 new workers; this year, Montgomery County's Precision for Medicine will add 170 to the rolls; and in 2011, Frederick-based Life Technologies hired 100 people.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
With lawmakers still far apart on how to overhaul Maryland's bail system, legislative leaders and the O'Malley administration have cobbled together a short-term fix that involves an executive order and recruiting private attorneys for little or no pay to represent poor defendants. At the direction of legislative leaders, a joint House and Senate committee has set aside $10 million in the state budget to address a ruling by Maryland's highest court that the current bail system is unconstitutional because it fails to provide lawyers early enough in the process.
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