Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSuppliers
IN THE NEWS

Suppliers

NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Reporter | June 6, 2008
At Baltimore's largest kosher grocery store, meat manager Chaim Fishman has learned to order twice as much poultry from his chief supplier as he used to. He knows that however much he orders, the company will ship half. Three weeks after federal immigration agents raided the AgriProcessors slaughterhouse in Postville, Iowa, and detained almost half of its work force, Baltimore's kosher markets and caterers are finding ways to satisfy one of the nation's most dedicated clienteles. "I'm ordering much more because I know they're going to halve me," said Fishman, sitting in an office above the Seven Mile Market in Pikesville.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 27, 2008
Production halted at GM A strike at General Motors' chief axle supplier halted production at GM Powertrain's Baltimore Transmission Plant. About 280 hourly workers were laid off at the White Marsh plant. Operations ceased April 7 when workers stopped manufacturing a hybrid transmission for the Chevrolet Tahoe. Production of a transmission for the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra was stopped March 10. Port cargo rises to $41.5 billion Propelled by a weakening dollar, a surge of exports - especially autos - drove the value of cargo moving through the port of Baltimore last year to a record $41.5 billion, though tonnage increased less than 1 percent, the Maryland Port Authority reported.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | April 23, 2008
Jennifer and Rob Brewington of Glenwood switched to an alternative electricity supplier two years ago, saved a few dollars and figured they would renew when the deal expired in June. That was before they checked the details. "It looks like they're raising the rates," says Jennifer Brewington. "Because they were slightly more reasonably priced than BGE back when I signed up with them, I thought they might continue to be."
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | April 23, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Citing contamination of drugs, pet food and toothpaste from China, members of Congress have endorsed funding for more federal safety inspectors and to police overseas suppliers. Dr. Andrew C. von Eschenbach, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, agreed that the agency needs more resources and for the first time accepted estimates, albeit tentatively, that an additional 500 inspectors and $70 million in funding was required to bolster foreign drug inspections. The emerging consensus, voiced yesterday at a House subcommittee hearing, comes a day after the FDA said as many as 81 Americans died after taking a popular blood-thinning drug tainted somewhere in China with an unapproved chemical.
BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | April 22, 2008
The lingering strike at General Motors Corp.'s chief axle supplier has halted production at GM Powertrain's Baltimore Transmission Plant. About 280 hourly workers have been temporarily laid off at the White Marsh plant, where the manufacturing of transmissions has ceased, GM spokesman John Raut said yesterday. The two-month strike at Detroit-based American Axle & Manufacturing Holdings Inc. has cut production at about 30 GM facilities, or close to half its plants, according to Dan Flores, also a GM spokesman.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 27, 2008
Since 2006, when the insurgency in Afghanistan sharply intensified, the Afghan government has been dependent on American logistics and military support in the war against al-Qaida and the Taliban. But to arm the Afghan forces that it hopes will lead this fight, the U.S. military has relied since early last year on a fledgling company led by a 22-year-old man whose vice president was a licensed masseur. With the award last January of a federal contract worth as much as nearly $300 million, the company, AEY Inc., which operates out of an unmarked office in Miami Beach, Fla., became the main supplier of munitions to Afghanistan's army and police forces.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | March 22, 2008
WASHINGTON -- A second American company recalled Heparin products yesterday as China announced that it was clamping down on production of the blood-thinning drug's main ingredient to prevent further cases of contamination. B. Braun Medical Inc. withdrew 23 lots of Heparin products after learning that it had received a contaminated ingredient. The Bethlehem, Pa., company described the recall as precautionary. It said it had not received any reports of side effects, even though the suspect lots have been sold in the United States and Canada.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | March 20, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Investigators have moved closer to understanding how a widely used blood thinner killed as many as 19 Americans, identifying the chemical that tainted the Heparin products. Meanwhile, the American companies that made Heparin and its main ingredient blamed suppliers from China for the contamination. The Food and Drug Administration said yesterday that the chemical was a kind of souped-up version of a compound commonly used to treat arthritic joints. The chemical - over-sulfated chondroitin sulfate - is not approved for use in prescription drugs sold in the United States, and it doesn't normally figure in the production of Heparin, FDA officials said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTER | March 20, 2008
Shelter Systems, a Westminster company that makes roof and floor trusses, had 220 employees in 2005. Now? Ninety. That's the tough reality for homebuilder suppliers, many of which are feeling the housing downturn as keenly as their clients. Permits for new residential units in the metro area were down 45 percent last year compared with 2005, according to the Baltimore Metropolitan Council, which means a lot less demand for trusses - plus windows, doors, carpeting, countertops and everything else builders need.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 14, 2008
Edward Stonewall "Eddie" Tochterman, former co-owner of T.G. Tochterman & Sons, the venerable Eastern Avenue tackle shop that has kept fishermen in rods and reels for more than 90 years, died in his sleep Sunday at Oak Crest Village retirement community in Parkville. He was 92. Mr. Tochterman, the son of Thomas G. and Anna K. Tochterman, was born at home at 244 S. Ann St. In 1916, the family moved to 1925 Eastern Ave., where they established a confectionary store. His father, who also worked at the Booth Fishery in the old Marsh Market, used to bring home unsold fish, fresh peelers or soft crabs, and sold them to streetcar-bound fishermen traveling to the Eastern Baltimore County fishing grounds.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.