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By Susan Tompor and Susan Tompor,Detroit Free Press | January 13, 2008
DETROIT -- Beginning this spring, a prepaid debit card for Social Security benefits will be introduced in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana. Later in 2008, the prepaid card - which is designed to help the Treasury Department cut down on the costs of mailing paper checks - would be rolled out nationwide. "The real value to the cardholder is access to things you can't get with cash," said Nora Arpin, director of government electronic solutions in Detroit for card administrator Comerica Bank, one of about a dozen financial institutions to compete for the business to issue the cards.
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NEWS
By Lauren Young | November 28, 2013
In the 19th and 20th centuries, cities across the country banned people with disabilities from begging in public. The laws targeted people with "physical and mental deformities," "imperfect bodies reduced by amputation" and "imbeciles. " Known as "ugly laws," their effect was to push people with disabilities out of public sight while further impoverishing them. While those laws have since been repealed, recent efforts in Baltimore city and county hearken back to them. A push to further criminalize panhandling in the city directly affects those with disabilities, because they constitute a substantial number of our city's beggars.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 11, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Blacks who have serious ailments have been much more likely than whites over the past 30 years to be rejected for benefits under Social Security disability programs, a study has found.The study, by the General Accounting Office, showed that from the initial claim through the appeals process, black people have a more difficult time obtaining benefits from the two largest federal programs for people with severe disabilities.The programs provide $43.2 billion annually in disability checks to millions and their families.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
As someone who has made a career advocating on behalf of those that depend on Social Security Disability and Supplemental Security Income benefits, I was disheartened to read Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s column, "Disability insurance entitlement explodes under Obama" (March 3). The percentage increase in people on Social Security disability in recent years was expected, due to the aging Baby Boomers, half of whom are now reaching "high disability years. " Additionally, there has been an increase of women in the workforce in recent decades, women who are now eligible to draw on their own earnings record when they become disabled.
NEWS
March 30, 2012
In his recent op-ed, "Sanctuary Baltimore, no questions asked" (March 26) Dan Rodricks wrongfully assumes that welcoming illegal immigrants will help increase Baltimore's tax base. But there is a consensus among nonpartisan economists that illegal immigrants are a fiscal drain on American taxpayers. A majority of illegal immigrants have less than a high school education and have well below average incomes. The National Research Council found that an illegal immigrant without a high school degree will impose a net cost on taxpayers of $89,000 over his or her lifetime.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2004
Yossif Sakirski used to enjoy painting buildings, going to parties - and having a little financial freedom, thanks to his monthly $546 Supplemental Security Income check. The Baltimore resident doesn't paint or go to parties these days because of a painful leg injury. Worse, he is scheduled to lose his monthly checks in five months because of a quirk in U.S. immigration law - one of the thousands of immigrants throughout the nation facing a similar fate. "At my age, to be left without any resources?"
NEWS
March 21, 1995
Wimpy FacadeIt is very sad to see Baltimore's Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier cower behind his wimpy facade and reject Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr.'s call for a special squad of officers to seize illegal firearms.Mr. Frazier is either going to do it now or do it later, after we have a thousand more shootings on the streets of Baltimore."No guts," says Officer Gary McLhinney, president of the police officers union. That statement sums it up completely when you assess Commissioner Frazier's job performance.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
As someone who has made a career advocating on behalf of those that depend on Social Security Disability and Supplemental Security Income benefits, I was disheartened to read Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s column, "Disability insurance entitlement explodes under Obama" (March 3). The percentage increase in people on Social Security disability in recent years was expected, due to the aging Baby Boomers, half of whom are now reaching "high disability years. " Additionally, there has been an increase of women in the workforce in recent decades, women who are now eligible to draw on their own earnings record when they become disabled.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
Marylanders who are fearful of losing their Medicaid health coverage could benefit from a proposal to increase the program's income limit. If the federal government approves the plan, Maryland Medicaid recipients would be able to earn as much as $4,792 a month and keep their health benefits by buying into Medicaid's health program with low periodic payments. The exact amount that participants would pay is still under discussion. However, the total cost would likely be less than $300 a year, state officials said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In a move that could delay or deny benefits for tens of thousands of people, the Social Security Administration has told its judges that they should, in most cases, disregard federal court precedents if those rulings conflict with agency policies.The order, issued as the agency faces a huge backlog of disputed claims, has drawn protests from federal courts, members of Congress and agency employees.It is being compared to positions taken in the early 1980s by the Reagan administration, which said it was bound only by Supreme Court decisions and did not have to "acquiesce" in decisions of lower courts that contradicted its reading of the Social Security law.Democrats denounced the Reagan administration's practice as lawless, and the administration took a more moderate position after Congress made clear that it disapproved of the practice.
NEWS
March 30, 2012
In his recent op-ed, "Sanctuary Baltimore, no questions asked" (March 26) Dan Rodricks wrongfully assumes that welcoming illegal immigrants will help increase Baltimore's tax base. But there is a consensus among nonpartisan economists that illegal immigrants are a fiscal drain on American taxpayers. A majority of illegal immigrants have less than a high school education and have well below average incomes. The National Research Council found that an illegal immigrant without a high school degree will impose a net cost on taxpayers of $89,000 over his or her lifetime.
BUSINESS
By Susan Tompor and Susan Tompor,Detroit Free Press | January 13, 2008
DETROIT -- Beginning this spring, a prepaid debit card for Social Security benefits will be introduced in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana. Later in 2008, the prepaid card - which is designed to help the Treasury Department cut down on the costs of mailing paper checks - would be rolled out nationwide. "The real value to the cardholder is access to things you can't get with cash," said Nora Arpin, director of government electronic solutions in Detroit for card administrator Comerica Bank, one of about a dozen financial institutions to compete for the business to issue the cards.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
Marylanders who are fearful of losing their Medicaid health coverage could benefit from a proposal to increase the program's income limit. If the federal government approves the plan, Maryland Medicaid recipients would be able to earn as much as $4,792 a month and keep their health benefits by buying into Medicaid's health program with low periodic payments. The exact amount that participants would pay is still under discussion. However, the total cost would likely be less than $300 a year, state officials said.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2004
Yossif Sakirski used to enjoy painting buildings, going to parties - and having a little financial freedom, thanks to his monthly $546 Supplemental Security Income check. The Baltimore resident doesn't paint or go to parties these days because of a painful leg injury. Worse, he is scheduled to lose his monthly checks in five months because of a quirk in U.S. immigration law - one of the thousands of immigrants throughout the nation facing a similar fate. "At my age, to be left without any resources?"
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In a move that could delay or deny benefits for tens of thousands of people, the Social Security Administration has told its judges that they should, in most cases, disregard federal court precedents if those rulings conflict with agency policies.The order, issued as the agency faces a huge backlog of disputed claims, has drawn protests from federal courts, members of Congress and agency employees.It is being compared to positions taken in the early 1980s by the Reagan administration, which said it was bound only by Supreme Court decisions and did not have to "acquiesce" in decisions of lower courts that contradicted its reading of the Social Security law.Democrats denounced the Reagan administration's practice as lawless, and the administration took a more moderate position after Congress made clear that it disapproved of the practice.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell,Sun Staff Writers | September 6, 1995
Despite nearly a decade of warnings, the Social Security Administration has done little to stop non-U.S. citizens who get millions of dollars in illegal or questionable disability payments, government investigators reported yesterday.In one of a series of troubling reports to Congress, the General Accounting Office concluded that Social Security has failed to hire enough bilingual caseworkers or investigators to stop "middlemen" from steering aliens into the agency's biggest program for the disabled.
NEWS
February 21, 1995
SSI disasterSupplemental Security Income was started to aid aged and disabled citizens. Now, the system has been turned into a financial disaster for Uncle Sam.Drug addicts and alcoholics are being paid monthly checks . . . because they can qualify as disabled. The cost to the federal government is over $1.4 billion annually.Elderly people brought legally to the U.S. by their families may qualify for SSI after three years, on the basis of poverty. Almost 400,000 of these people are receiving retirement benefits and have never contributed a penny to the Social Security funds during their working lives.
NEWS
March 21, 1995
Wimpy FacadeIt is very sad to see Baltimore's Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier cower behind his wimpy facade and reject Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr.'s call for a special squad of officers to seize illegal firearms.Mr. Frazier is either going to do it now or do it later, after we have a thousand more shootings on the streets of Baltimore."No guts," says Officer Gary McLhinney, president of the police officers union. That statement sums it up completely when you assess Commissioner Frazier's job performance.
NEWS
February 21, 1995
SSI disasterSupplemental Security Income was started to aid aged and disabled citizens. Now, the system has been turned into a financial disaster for Uncle Sam.Drug addicts and alcoholics are being paid monthly checks . . . because they can qualify as disabled. The cost to the federal government is over $1.4 billion annually.Elderly people brought legally to the U.S. by their families may qualify for SSI after three years, on the basis of poverty. Almost 400,000 of these people are receiving retirement benefits and have never contributed a penny to the Social Security funds during their working lives.
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