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Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

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NEWS
By Scott Klinger | October 21, 2013
Congress seems to be focusing its austerity efforts on America's most vulnerable citizens, including those who need help feeding their families. Meanwhile, large food subsidies that benefit the most affluent Americans aren't even on the table. The House of Representatives recently voted to cut $4 billion a year from food stamps, known more formally as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). A cut of that level would mean 3.8 million Americans would lose the help they receive to put food on their families' tables, according to the Congressional Budget Office.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2014
The federal government plans to shift the cost of accepting food stamps to retailers in the coming weeks, a move that Baltimore officials and anti-hunger advocates said Tuesday could make it harder for some families to buy groceries. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and her administration are working with advocacy groups to inform merchants of the change and to help them prepare. About a third of the city's population relies on the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, known as food stamps.
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NEWS
December 9, 2011
As an organization working to end childhood hunger in Maryland, Share Our Strength appreciates your editorial about the merits of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program ("Food stamp recipients are the new welfare queens," Dec. 4). Three-quarters of all SNAP benefits go to families with kids. Over time, SNAP has proven to be efficient, effective and fraud is at a historic low. Critical federal child nutrition programs like SNAP and school breakfast are vital to the well being of America's children.
NEWS
July 28, 2014
It didn't take Democrats much time to denounce Rep. Paul Ryan's latest plan for addressing poverty in this country. The main feature of the Republican's proposed "Opportunity Grant" would be to roll a lot of social welfare programs together and leave it mostly to states to decide how the money is spent, which sounds a great deal like the block grant proposals of the past. Critics included Maryland's own Rep. Chris Van Hollen, ranking member on the House Budget Committee, who said the former vice presidential nominee has used the mantra of "reform" as a cover to cut safety-net programs.
NEWS
February 17, 2013
In his recent State of the Union address, President Barack Obama said "we can't just cut our way to prosperity" ("Obama outlines ambitious agenda for second term," Feb. 13). I could not agree more. More than 12.5 percent of households in Maryland and 50 million families across America - seniors, children, individuals with disabilities, and the working poor - face hunger. They skip meals, decide whether to pay for heating costs or food and try to make limited dollars stretch at the grocery store.
NEWS
September 20, 2011
The stark irony of your recent editorial ("The nonworking poor," Sept. 18) appearing on the same page as a Doonesbury comic strip noting that 400 families control more wealth than 50 percent of Americans' combined was inescapable. Thank you for your thoughtful, balanced analysis of the reality of poverty across our nation. Clearly, the recession is not over for more than 46 million poor Americans. When nearly one in eight Americans is officially poor, we must examine whether a family of four can exist on $22,351 year.
NEWS
June 23, 2013
As chefs, our lives revolve around food. Yet in the United States, 16 million kids struggle with hunger and more than 250,000 of those kids are from Maryland. We joined the fight against childhood hunger for them. Fortunately, families can rely on programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps). SNAP fights childhood hunger. The program makes it possible for families to put food on their tables, even when times are tough. In fact, SNAP is the most powerful and effective anti-hunger program for kids, providing benefits to approximately 23 million children nationwide each month.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
On Nov. 1, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits (also known as food stamps) will be reduced, creating ramifications beyond the already incomprehensible fact that more than one in eight central Maryland residents (and one in five children) is food insecure. The impact of these cuts will ripple throughout our communities and our economy well into the future. The Sun wisely pointed out in its Oct. 30 editorial ("Hunger gets a boost" that retailers, distributors, truck drivers and particularly farmers will be hurting as a result of the SNAP reductions.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
Tens of thousands of people in Baltimore who use food stamps to buy groceries can now do their shopping at the Baltimore Farmers' Market and Bazaar under the Jones Falls Expressway, thanks to a new token system launched Sunday. Customers who don't have cash at the fresh-produce market off East Saratoga Street can now swipe their debit cards to make purchases as well. At a public opening of the market's new welcome center, where debit and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
The Maryland Department of Human Resources will step up efforts to find people who sell their food stamps for cash or otherwise defraud the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, under a pilot program with the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Wednesday. The agencies will sign enhanced data sharing agreements to monitor the more than 754,000 Marylanders who receive food stamps and the nearly 3,800 retailers that accept the benefits. Virginia will also participate in the initiative, which will gradually expand to other states over time.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
The U.S. Senate is poised to give final approval Tuesday to a nearly $1 trillion bill that would dictate the nation's agriculture policy for the next five years, reduce how much taxpayers spend on food stamps and alter conservation programs for the Chesapeake Bay. Though debate over the farm bill has not been as publicly rancorous as the recent budget battles in Washington, the farm bill nevertheless profoundly affects American ...
NEWS
By John Fritze and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Tracey Coleman understands that many people are skeptical about the federal food stamp program, and she agrees that some reform may be needed. But the 43-year-old Essex woman also knows food stamps have kept her family fed since her husband was laid off from the Sparrows Point steel plant last year. And she doesn't believe the broad cuts Congress is considering are the right thing to do. "It's made a difference in our life," said Coleman, who is raising three children, including a daughter who is autistic.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
On Nov. 1, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits (also known as food stamps) will be reduced, creating ramifications beyond the already incomprehensible fact that more than one in eight central Maryland residents (and one in five children) is food insecure. The impact of these cuts will ripple throughout our communities and our economy well into the future. The Sun wisely pointed out in its Oct. 30 editorial ("Hunger gets a boost" that retailers, distributors, truck drivers and particularly farmers will be hurting as a result of the SNAP reductions.
NEWS
By Scott Klinger | October 21, 2013
Congress seems to be focusing its austerity efforts on America's most vulnerable citizens, including those who need help feeding their families. Meanwhile, large food subsidies that benefit the most affluent Americans aren't even on the table. The House of Representatives recently voted to cut $4 billion a year from food stamps, known more formally as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). A cut of that level would mean 3.8 million Americans would lose the help they receive to put food on their families' tables, according to the Congressional Budget Office.
NEWS
September 18, 2013
The recent indictment of 10 Baltimore business owners or operators on charges of stealing more than $7 million from the food stamp program is a welcome development but badly timed. No doubt it will be used as fodder by House Republicans angling to take billions of dollars out of the mouths of poor people this week. The scheme allegedly perpetrated by the Baltimore grocers is a familiar one. They accepted Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) cards from customers, charged them for inflated or phantom purchases, gave out cash and reserved the biggest cut of the phony transaction for themselves.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
A federal grand jury in Maryland has indicted nine Baltimore business owners alleging almost $7 million in food stamp fraud.  The scheme, called "food stamp trafficking," involved the store owners redeeming food stamp benefits in exchange for cash and splitting the proceeds with food stamp recipients, authorities say. One store owner, who runs the Second Obama Express in West Baltimore, is accused of obtaining more than $2 million in payments for...
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
A federal grand jury indicted 10 Baltimore business owners or operators on charges of stealing nearly $7 million from food assistance programs by agreeing to debit cash for beneficiaries without selling food - then keeping a cut of the proceeds. The owner of a corner grocery in West Baltimore called "Second Obama Express" is accused of obtaining more than $2 million in payments for food sales that never occurred, a practice that authorities call "food stamp trafficking. " Eight others are accused of taking between $348,000 and $1.4 million.
NEWS
By Tom Albright, Holly Freishtat and Robert S. Lawrence | November 14, 2011
In Baltimore City, 1 in 8 families with young children are "food insecure," and 20 percent of all residents live in poverty. More than half a million Marylanders get help affording food through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). In fact, SNAP, or what we used to call food stamps, enrolled 45 million people nationwide this year, a leap from 25 million in 2008. Shouldn't SNAP participants in Baltimore - or other cities - be able to spend their SNAP dollars on nutritious, locally produced food?
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
A federal grand jury indicted 10 Baltimore business owners or operators on charges of stealing nearly $7 million from food assistance programs by agreeing to debit cash for beneficiaries without selling food - then keeping a cut of the proceeds. The owner of a corner grocery in West Baltimore called "Second Obama Express" is accused of obtaining more than $2 million in payments for food sales that never occurred, a practice that authorities call "food stamp trafficking. " Eight others are accused of taking between $348,000 and $1.4 million.
NEWS
By Jami-Lin Williams | August 22, 2013
As an infant born in Waterville, Maine, to a single, teenage mother, I relied on food stamps for the first four months of my life. My family's economic status later required me to participate in other federal assistance programs like Head Start and the National School Lunch Program, so that I would have access to adequate nutrition and greater opportunities. Today I am a successful young woman with an undergraduate degree from Wellesley College, a master's degree from Stanford University, and a bright future.
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