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By SUSAN REIMER | September 30, 1997
MY SON, NOW 13, believes he has outgrown the need for afterschool supervision while his father and I work. And apparently the federal government agrees.Since he is no longer 12, he is no longer eligible under the Dependent Care Tax Credit, so his father and I no longer qualify for the modest tax break we received for the huge checks we have been writing for day-care services and camps all these years.This tax credit never amounted to more than a few hundred dollars a year, and it was not the reason we provided for his care after school, but it was an endorsement for our thinking that 6 was not the right age for a child to come home to an empty house.
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By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Relatives of a 10-year-old disabled foster child who died at an Anne Arundel County group home last month and the guardian of another resident whose inadequate care there led to a serious illness have filed notice that they intend to sue the state for failing to supervise the facility's operator. An attorney for the two former residents of LifeLine Inc.'s Laurel-area group home said he sent a formal notice to the state treasurer's office that he intends to seek monetary damages for each incident - the details of which were highlighted in a Baltimore Sun investigation of the company.
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By Chicago Tribune | May 17, 1995
CHICAGO -- Columnist Mike Royko pleaded guilty yesterday to a drunken-driving charge in connection with an automobile accident last December in Winnetka, and he was sentenced to two years' supervision.After listening to a victim-impact statement from the other motorist, who asked the court to permanently revoke Mr. Royko's driving privileges, Judge Daniel Gillespie extended an automatic six-month suspension of Mr. Royko's driver's license by 4 1/2 months until mid-December.Judge Gillespie, who said before sentencing that he has thought about the misdemeanor case each day, also imposed a $1,000 fine and sentenced the 63-year-old columnist to perform 80 hours of community service by reading to the blind.
NEWS
October 28, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler surely has no authority for other people's children, but he, and all adults surely have responsibility for the safety of all children ("Gansler says breaking up teen party was not his job," Oct. 24). It is up to all of us to help remove youngsters from dangerous situations. Ignore, if you are so irresponsible, the dangerous behavior of other kids, but, Mr Gansler, you left your own son in a place where you knew there was, at the least, teen-aged drinking.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1999
The Maryland Real Estate Commission voted yesterday to tighten supervision of sales agents by their brokers.The 7-0 vote, with one absention, came after a 10-month study by a committee of commissioners and industry professionals. It followed assurances from the attorney general's office that closer supervision would not change agents' status as independent contractors.Most sales agents operate as independent contractors and not as employees.Brokers, however, are required by law to "exercise reasonable and adequate supervision" of its sales agents.
NEWS
April 24, 2008
When juvenile offenders under the supervision of the state show up dead in Baltimore or are charged with murder, something's got to give. Somebody has to start asking questions about the teenagers, their daily lives and the system overseeing them. Those questions have been asked and provoked a more comprehensive review of hundreds of Baltimore cases, and the results so far are damning. A lax system of supervision, overwhelmed caseworkers and poor administrative oversight, all of which suggest a system that needs a comprehensive overhaul.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 9, 2001
As President Bush maneuvers to strengthen ties with the Teamsters, the union has mounted an intensive campaign to persuade the administration to end 12 years of federal supervision of the union, once considered the United States' most corrupt. The Teamsters' campaign comes at the same time that the union's president, James P. Hoffa, has indicated that his union might support Republicans if they back the Teamsters on several crucial issues. The Teamsters have been lobbying the White House, the Justice Department and the U.S. attorney in New York City for an end to supervision, and Hoffa has made clear that it is his No. 1 wish from the Bush administration.
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By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2004
An Aberdeen man who pleaded guilty last year to possessing child pornography will spend 64 months in prison and then will be supervised for the rest of his life by federal agents, a U.S. District Court judge ruled yesterday. The strict sentence was hailed by prosecutors, who said it was the first time in Maryland that a federal judge had imposed life supervision in a child pornography case. Most people are supervised after their prison time for a few years. But concerns about recidivism among pedophiles has prompted prosecutors and child welfare advocates to push for tougher post-prison sanctions.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2001
Howard County police took over supervision of the county's 911 communications center this week after the resignation of the center's civilian director and two publicized complaints over the past year. John A. Hampton, the county government's chief of communications for nearly eight years, worked his last day Friday and has refused to discuss his departure or the center's operation. County officials were cautious in comments about the reason for the change, which puts 55 employees under the control of Lt. Lee Lachman and removes more than half the employees from the supervision of the information systems services department.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1999
An 18-year-old resident of the Charles H. Hickey School has been charged with committing a "perverted sexual practice" with his younger roommate at the facility, and the incident is being investigated by the Maryland State Police and the Department of Juvenile Justice.The charges stem from an incident Aug. 19 in Douglas Hall on the Cub Hill campus, according to officials at the school and documents filed in Baltimore County's district court. Jesse Allen Adkins, 18, and his 15-year-old roommate were locked in their room and began playing a kind of "truth or dare" game that turned sexual, according to charging documents.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
Baltimore County Councilman Todd Huff was sentenced Tuesday to two years of supervised probation after pleading guilty to driving under the influence. Baltimore County Circuit Judge Timothy Martin also gave Huff a one-year suspended jail sentence. He ordered Huff not to drink alcohol during his probation, and to submit to random urine tests as part of the state's Drinking Driver Monitor Program. He also ordered Huff to complete a 26-week alcohol treatment program that the councilman has already started.
NEWS
By Alison Matas, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
Akua Zenzele, a community supervision agent in Southeast Baltimore who works with parolees, knows the first few days after being released from incarceration are crucial for former inmates. Many are paroled with few resources and nowhere to go. Some end up homeless, and without a way to meet basic needs; others wind up back in jail after committing new crimes just to get by. Zenzele, whose job is to monitor those on parole and probation, has seen the cycle play out before. When she found out that one of her clients was living in a homeless shelter, she decided to try a new strategy to help people get settled as soon as possible.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
A federal judge sentenced a Pennsylvania man to 10 years in prison for making videos of boys using urinals at two I-95 Cecil and Harford county rest stops last May. Brian Matthew Williams, 28, loitered at the Maryland House and Chesapeake House rest stops for five hours last May filming boys on his cell phone from an adjacent urinal, authorities said. After taking the video, he would follow them out and take full length photos of them. He made 21 videos in all. The parents of one of the victims reported Williams' suspicious actions and he was arrested by Maryland State Police.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2013
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts said Friday that his officers' rushed review of speed camera tickets has produced "unacceptable" mistakes and pledged "dramatic" reform of the system, including increased staffing. "To be perfectly honest, we've made some mistakes that we shouldn't have been making in reviewing citations," Batts said in his first public comments since The Baltimore Sun found Baltimore's speed cameras have been issuing erroneous citations. "I've sat down and gone through the process, and we're making some dramatic changes.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2012
The historic Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum in Baltimore, which lost its longtime curator and was shuttered in September amid an operational reorganization, has in the last month been defaced by graffiti and robbed of its wooden front steps, according to those involved in the museum's revitalization. City officials said they are aware of the damage and recently repainted the museum door, which had been scrawled with mostly illegible writings in marker. They also said they regularly check on the museum and respond to any complaints about its condition.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
A 25-year-old Gambrills man was sentenced Tuesday to eight years in prison for possession of child pornography, including images depicting "sadistic and violent conduct" toward children, according to prosecutors. Robert Jay Hudson II, who pleaded guilty to the charge in July, will also have to serve 40 years of supervised release after his incarceration and be registered as a sex offender wherever he lives, works or attends school, the office of Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein said.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1997
Lapses of supervision and missing information taint a series of cases in the city's drug treatment court, one of the state's model criminal justice programs, an internal audit has found.The Aug. 20 audit, reviewed this week by The Sun, is the latest examination of the Alternative Sentencing Unit, a Baltimore community supervision program that handles about a third of the drug treatment court cases.Problems uncovered in the reviews have led to the reassignment of Thomas E. Kirk, administrator of the 8-year-old Alternative Sentencing Unit.
NEWS
August 17, 1997
IT WAS A GOOD IDEA when it began eight years ago and it's a good idea now. But the state should not allow an alternative probation program for higher-risk defendants to continue if it isn't going to supervise persons in the project properly.A Sun investigation earlier this year revealed deficiencies in the operation of the Alternative Sentencing Unit. Those lapses have been confirmed in an audit by state probation officials. The audit said defendants were committing new crimes while in the program and were testing positive for continued drug use.The defendants' persistent criminal activity is a result of their not being closely monitored.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
Regal Bancorp Inc. of Owings Mills has reached an agreement with the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, the regulator announced Tuesday. The holding company for Regal Bank & Trust agreed not to declare or pay any dividends or incur more debt without the approval of regulators. The company also agreed to submit annual cash-flow projections and quarterly progress reports. Since last fall, Regal Bank & Trust has been operating under an order by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. to shore up its finances.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
Students at a Baltimore County high school drew a racially offensive picture on a classroom board last week and then sent it out on Twitter, prompting the principal to call police and suspend several students. The picture, drawn during class at Eastern Technical High School, shows three nooses hanging from the rafters of a building, according to Baltimore County police spokesman Cathy Batton. Beside the ropes are a burning cross with three stick figures in pointed hats, suggesting the Ku Klux Klan.
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