Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSuperpower
IN THE NEWS

Superpower

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 21, 2014
Part of the reason that Russia has acted to annex Crimea and will likely grab at least the eastern portion of the Ukraine in the very near future is that every American president since the break-up of the Soviet Union has loudly, and at times obnoxiously, proclaimed that the United States is the only remaining superpower in the world ( "Putin's land grab," March 19). Mr. Putin's actions are his way of saying that Russia also a superpower, and since he has ground troops and nuclear weapons to back up his claim, he makes a pretty convincing albeit heavy handed case.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 21, 2014
Part of the reason that Russia has acted to annex Crimea and will likely grab at least the eastern portion of the Ukraine in the very near future is that every American president since the break-up of the Soviet Union has loudly, and at times obnoxiously, proclaimed that the United States is the only remaining superpower in the world ( "Putin's land grab," March 19). Mr. Putin's actions are his way of saying that Russia also a superpower, and since he has ground troops and nuclear weapons to back up his claim, he makes a pretty convincing albeit heavy handed case.
Advertisement
NEWS
By William Pfaff | August 24, 2007
PARIS -- Washington and the European capitals are all preoccupied with China's economic growth and expanding international influence and activities, taken as evidence that in the not-too-distant future China will become a superpower. Washington thinks about China's becoming a military as well as economic superpower. The Europeans think about trade and economic competition. Both underestimate what it takes to become a modern industrial superpower. It requires a very high level of autonomous technological capacity, to begin with, as well as sophisticated and innovative industry to make use of it - both of which China today lacks.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | July 24, 2012
Thanks to an upcoming UMBC student seminar focused on American decline, I've been thinking a lot about what ails our great country. So much is being written lately on this subject. In my own travels and discussions with fellow Americans, I've noticed a disconcerting unease about the nation's future. In fact, there is growing evidence that for the first time in United States history, our best days may be behind us. Some of the reasons are external and largely beyond our control, such as the rising competition from fast-developing nations.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara | March 18, 2003
WHAT DOES George W. Bush want to do? What is his plan for us all? His address to the American people last night notwithstanding, the question in its broader sense remains unanswered, ripe for speculation. The president's immediate aim is to destroy the government of Iraq, removing or killing Saddam Hussein. This will be Mr. Bush's second war against another sovereign state since the attack by mostly Saudi terrorists on the World Trade Center and Pentagon. It is justified as a part of a continuing campaign against terrorism, for which reason it is now appropriate to ask, Who will be next?
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | April 9, 2001
WASHINGTON -- It's just outrageous, isn't it, that those fool Chinese don't understand what a privilege it is to be spied upon by the United States. Do you think they're upset that we have paid bounties in the millions of dollars to defectors from their country and others who have stolen their planes or codes and handed them over for American inspection? Remember the Russian pilot who defected with a new MiG-25 and turned it over to us in Japan a few years ago? We, of course, gave the plane back -- nine weeks later, in packing crates.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | December 13, 1990
Paris.Is the United States still a superpower? This is a facile question inviting a polemical response. However, it deserves an answer.What is a superpower? Obviously a country which possesses surpassing material, industrial and military resources -- as does the U.S. One which believes that its own society is a model for others. Americans have that belief. However, the operative element in being a superpower is the willingness and ability to use power to impose a certain order on the international scene, together with a willingness to pay the costs of doing so.The United States possessed that quality in the past.
NEWS
July 12, 1996
THEY ARE two superpowers on the same planet. The U.S. and China have a mutual interest in managing their relationship in a manner not injurious to their own interests or to the world -- all the more so since they have so much to disagree about.The visit of National Security Adviser Anthony Lake to Beijing has put the two governments in command of their relationship rather than allowing it to dictate to them. This is not alliance or historic friendship or ideological blinders. It is national interest and common sense.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 24, 2001
MOSCOW - That was some symbol that went streaking through the sky over Fiji yesterday, breaking up into pieces and sizzling into the cool waters of the Pacific Ocean. The Mir space station went up as a symbol, and it came down as a symbol. In between it came to stand for perseverance, if nothing more. Perseverance by an intrepid series of cosmonauts and ground crews in the face of fire, collision, leaking air, collapsing finances, cultural conflict and personality clash. To the very end, there were Russians who wanted to keep Mir going as a manifestation of Russian prowess.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 30, 1992
George figures the recession is like Saddam. You tell it to get out. When it doesn't, you bomb it out.It's getting so you can't be against Clinton without being accused of prudery.Yeltsin is returning to Maryland, scene of his earlier triumph.The superpower nuclear race is still on. Now they are running back the other way.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 21, 2011
Readers will recall how it took an hour for me to get a representative of Verizon, the communications superpower, to do as I asked and simply disconnect my home telephone and leave me with Internet service only. Of course, Verizon Internet service turned out to be more costly by itself than in combination with a land line, but that's the Egg Roll Principle of Commerce at play: An egg roll at Happy Wok costs more by itself than it does when ordered with the lunch combo. So, after grumbling about that, I just accepted the Verizon deal — about $40 a month for Internet service, and no more home phone.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 22, 2011
Like President Barack Obama and President Hu Jintao of China, Verizon and I recently engaged in a summit. I called The Big V — truly, a communications superpower — to cancel my home phone. Rachel took the call for the company and put up pleasant resistance for nearly an hour. It became a test of wills and power. I want to drop my home phone, I told Rachel, but keep my Verizon Internet service. "May I ask why?" said she. Because I'm not using the land line.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | February 1, 2009
They will flock from every direction, clad in black and gold, hungry for pierogi and eager to watch their beloved Pittsburgh Steelers win a record sixth Super Bowl. Sure, that scene will unfold at countless Pittsburgh bars and eateries today. But it's also a pretty good guess of how things will look at Harold's Corral. Why is that remarkable? Well, because Harold's is on the outskirts of Phoenix, about 30 miles from where the Arizona Cardinals play their home games. Yes, it's very possible that the most raucous collection of football fans in Arizona will not be rooting for the Cardinals today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 1, 2008
The ticklish fun of Iron Man comes from watching a happy cast in fighting trim make a concept that should sink like a lead dirigible do cartwheels on the ground and barrel-rolls in the sky. Robert Downey Jr. plays Tony Stark, a munitions tycoon who learns the dangers of arms proliferation first-hand when he's kidnapped in Afghanistan and sees that his weapons are best-sellers in enemy territory. His insurgent captors order him to create a copy of his devastating Jericho missile system.
NEWS
By David Rieff | September 18, 2007
In Washington these days, people talk a lot about the collapse of the bipartisan foreign policy consensus that existed during the Cold War. But however bitter today's disputes are about Iraq or the prosecution of the so-called global war on terrorism, there is one bedrock assumption about foreign policy that remains truly bipartisan: The United States will remain the sole superpower, and the guarantor of international security and global trade, for the...
NEWS
By William Pfaff | August 24, 2007
PARIS -- Washington and the European capitals are all preoccupied with China's economic growth and expanding international influence and activities, taken as evidence that in the not-too-distant future China will become a superpower. Washington thinks about China's becoming a military as well as economic superpower. The Europeans think about trade and economic competition. Both underestimate what it takes to become a modern industrial superpower. It requires a very high level of autonomous technological capacity, to begin with, as well as sophisticated and innovative industry to make use of it - both of which China today lacks.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 6, 1996
SPIN BOLDAK, Afghanistan -- A fierce wind blew down from the barren Khwaja Amran mountains, whipping up a stinging sandstorm, so Maulvi Abdul Samad and his band of fighters, some only in their teens, took shelter in a crumbling house.They sat on the floor of pounded earth, cradled their assault rifles in their arms and shared slabs of unleavened bread. The fighters listened with silent respect as Samad, their fork-bearded elder, spoke of what more than 15 years of warfare had taught him."How can you conceive that a country that was almost nothing smashed the world's greatest power, the Soviet Union, into pieces?"
NEWS
By Thomas P. M. Barnett | January 3, 2005
IN HIS CLASSIC description of globalization The Lexus and the Olive Tree, columnist Thomas L. Friedman quotes an Egyptian professor asking, "Does globalization mean we all have to become Americans?" This simple question contains the current great myth of globalization, within which we can locate much of the world's anxiety regarding America's global war on terrorism. In short, the world's current anti-Americanism is based on the notion that globalization is an American plot to enslave the planet in an economic and military empire of unprecedented historical scope, with the war being nothing more than propaganda to hide our true intentions.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 2, 2007
. TEHRAN, Iran --President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad of Iran, under increasing criticism at home, said yesterday that his nation was becoming a superpower and that the U.N. sanctions would not deter it from pursuing its nuclear program. "We are rapidly becoming a superpower," Ahmadinejad told reporters after laying flowers on the tomb of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini on the anniversary of the 1979 revolution he led. "Our strength does not come from military weapons or an economic capability," the ISNA news agency quoted him as saying.
NEWS
By Thomas P. M. Barnett | January 3, 2005
IN HIS CLASSIC description of globalization The Lexus and the Olive Tree, columnist Thomas L. Friedman quotes an Egyptian professor asking, "Does globalization mean we all have to become Americans?" This simple question contains the current great myth of globalization, within which we can locate much of the world's anxiety regarding America's global war on terrorism. In short, the world's current anti-Americanism is based on the notion that globalization is an American plot to enslave the planet in an economic and military empire of unprecedented historical scope, with the war being nothing more than propaganda to hide our true intentions.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.