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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | March 7, 1995
Telescopes on board the shuttle Endeavour yesterday captured data on iron molecules blasted into space by a supernova explosion in 1006, and on carbon blown from a much smaller stellar blast first observed last month."
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From Sun staff reports | July 14, 2013
Team Supernova used a nine-goal fourth-quarter run to defeat Team Eclipse, 24-15, in Saturday night's Major League Lacrosse All-Star Game in the rain before an announced 6,184 at American Legion Memorial Stadium in Charlotte, N.C. The Hamilton Nationals' Kevin Crowley was named Most Valuable Player after a three-goal, two-assist performance. "It was a lot of fun. It's great to play in front of such a big crowd," Crowley said. "They stuck out the weather and these conditions. They're avid fans.
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SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | July 14, 2013
Team Supernova used a nine-goal fourth-quarter run to defeat Team Eclipse, 24-15, in Saturday night's Major League Lacrosse All-Star Game in the rain before an announced 6,184 at American Legion Memorial Stadium in Charlotte, N.C. The Hamilton Nationals' Kevin Crowley was named Most Valuable Player after a three-goal, two-assist performance. "It was a lot of fun. It's great to play in front of such a big crowd," Crowley said. "They stuck out the weather and these conditions. They're avid fans.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
Description: NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has detected a supernova that exploded more than 10 billion years ago, the most distant of its kind ever spotted. It was 4 percent farther away and 350 million years older than the previous record-holder, a supernova found three months ago by a team at the U.S. Energy Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. Researchers: David O. Jones of the Johns Hopkins University was the lead author on a paper detailing the discovery.
NEWS
By Luther Young and Luther Young,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 17, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- Astronomers working around the shortcomings of the Hubble Space Telescope reported their latest results yesterday, including the first glimpse deep into the heart of a globular cluster of stars, a close-up of a developing supernova and a precise distance measurement to a nearby galaxy that could help pin down the age of the universe.But they also pointedly told those attending the 177th American Astronomical Society meeting that such success doesn't mean the $1.5 billion orbiting telescope shouldn't be repaired as planned in 1993 to correct for its serious mirror flaw.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | February 25, 2006
Astronomers around the world are pointing their telescopes toward the expected appearance of a new supernova - the explosion of a massive and very distant star. The excitement follows the detection Feb.17 of an unprecedented blast of high-energy radiation, called a gamma ray burst, from a galaxy 440 million light-years from Earth. Gamma ray bursts, or GRBs, are observed about once a day. But astronomers trace almost all of them to the extreme depths of the universe, billions of light years away.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2002
WASHINGTON - Two scientists from Baltimore say they've found evidence that a global extinction of some marine life about 2 million years ago might have been triggered by the explosion of a passing star. The blast would have showered the planet with cosmic rays for decades, or perhaps as long as 1,000 years, the researchers said. The radiation would have upset the atmospheric ozone chemistry that shields Earth from the sun's ultraviolet radiation, allowing enough to reach the surface to kill off many microscopic ocean plankton and some of the bigger creatures that eat it. "If it is confirmed that this extinction was really provoked by a supernova, it is the best information we have about the destruction of the ozone layer," said Narciso Benitez, an associate research scientist in astronomy at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 20, 1994
The Hubble Space Telescope, taking detailed pictures of the site of an exploding star, or supernova, has confronted astronomers with a new mystery: How to explain the appearance of two thin loops of bright gases encircling the region like a pair of Hula Hoops out in space.In describing the new Hubble pictures yesterday, Dr. Christopher Burrows, an astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, said the rings are "are completely unlike anything we had expected to see" in the area of a supernova.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 3, 1995
CHICAGO -- Scientists long have been puzzled by "mass extinctions" -- several devastating moments in the history of life on Earth when great numbers of species suddenly died off.Although the riddle of the dinosaur's demise has been plausibly unraveled -- most scientists believe a giant meteor crashed into Earth, upsetting its climate -- other, even more dramatic mass extinctions have remained unexplained.Now comes a new theory: A distant exploding star burned off Earth's protective ozone layer in a virtual flash-fire, allowing the unfiltered sun's light to flood the surface with deadly radiation.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | July 18, 2007
Baltimore astronomer Adam Riess, the lead author on the 1998 paper that first reported that the expansion of the universe is accelerating, will share in the $500,000 Peter Gruber Cosmology Prize for 2007. The unrestricted cash award and gold medal are given annually to scientists for "theoretical, analytical, or conceptual discoveries leading to fundamental advances in the field," according to the foundation's Web site, where the selection was made public yesterday.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | July 18, 2007
Baltimore astronomer Adam Riess, the lead author on the 1998 paper that first reported that the expansion of the universe is accelerating, will share in the $500,000 Peter Gruber Cosmology Prize for 2007. The unrestricted cash award and gold medal are given annually to scientists for "theoretical, analytical, or conceptual discoveries leading to fundamental advances in the field," according to the foundation's Web site, where the selection was made public yesterday.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | February 25, 2006
Astronomers around the world are pointing their telescopes toward the expected appearance of a new supernova - the explosion of a massive and very distant star. The excitement follows the detection Feb.17 of an unprecedented blast of high-energy radiation, called a gamma ray burst, from a galaxy 440 million light-years from Earth. Gamma ray bursts, or GRBs, are observed about once a day. But astronomers trace almost all of them to the extreme depths of the universe, billions of light years away.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2002
WASHINGTON - Two scientists from Baltimore say they've found evidence that a global extinction of some marine life about 2 million years ago might have been triggered by the explosion of a passing star. The blast would have showered the planet with cosmic rays for decades, or perhaps as long as 1,000 years, the researchers said. The radiation would have upset the atmospheric ozone chemistry that shields Earth from the sun's ultraviolet radiation, allowing enough to reach the surface to kill off many microscopic ocean plankton and some of the bigger creatures that eat it. "If it is confirmed that this extinction was really provoked by a supernova, it is the best information we have about the destruction of the ozone layer," said Narciso Benitez, an associate research scientist in astronomy at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Laura Dreibelbis and Laura Dreibelbis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 14, 2000
"Who's the smartest person in this room?" asks teacher Edna Turner. "I am," comes the chorus from the 10 or so pupils in the classroom. The Harper's Choice Middle School children are part of an innovative after-school program called the SuperNovas, the only one of its kind in Howard County. Turner, the gifted-and-talented program resource teacher at the Columbia school, knows that if they believe in themselves, they will do well. A nova is a star that increases in brightness, hence the name.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | March 7, 1995
Telescopes on board the shuttle Endeavour yesterday captured data on iron molecules blasted into space by a supernova explosion in 1006, and on carbon blown from a much smaller stellar blast first observed last month."
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 3, 1995
CHICAGO -- Scientists long have been puzzled by "mass extinctions" -- several devastating moments in the history of life on Earth when great numbers of species suddenly died off.Although the riddle of the dinosaur's demise has been plausibly unraveled -- most scientists believe a giant meteor crashed into Earth, upsetting its climate -- other, even more dramatic mass extinctions have remained unexplained.Now comes a new theory: A distant exploding star burned off Earth's protective ozone layer in a virtual flash-fire, allowing the unfiltered sun's light to flood the surface with deadly radiation.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
BOSTON -- Sometime between their two-hour team meetin in Chicago and their 20-minute tag-team match at Camden Yards, the Orioles found their soul.It is one of the great mysteries of sport, this thing called team chemistry, but it has developed just in time for the club to remain a credible challenger in the American League East. The Orioles are back in business with a 10-game winning streak that has lifted them back to respectability, which leaves only one question:Is this the real thing, or just a fantasy?
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
Description: NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has detected a supernova that exploded more than 10 billion years ago, the most distant of its kind ever spotted. It was 4 percent farther away and 350 million years older than the previous record-holder, a supernova found three months ago by a team at the U.S. Energy Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. Researchers: David O. Jones of the Johns Hopkins University was the lead author on a paper detailing the discovery.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 20, 1994
The Hubble Space Telescope, taking detailed pictures of the site of an exploding star, or supernova, has confronted astronomers with a new mystery: How to explain the appearance of two thin loops of bright gases encircling the region like a pair of Hula Hoops out in space.In describing the new Hubble pictures yesterday, Dr. Christopher Burrows, an astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, said the rings are "are completely unlike anything we had expected to see" in the area of a supernova.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
BOSTON -- Sometime between their two-hour team meetin in Chicago and their 20-minute tag-team match at Camden Yards, the Orioles found their soul.It is one of the great mysteries of sport, this thing called team chemistry, but it has developed just in time for the club to remain a credible challenger in the American League East. The Orioles are back in business with a 10-game winning streak that has lifted them back to respectability, which leaves only one question:Is this the real thing, or just a fantasy?
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