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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 31, 2007
Yesterday, Ingmar Bergman finally confronted the great antagonist of his epic moviemaking career. The writer-director who created indelible images of mortality came face to face with Death. At the age of 89, he died at his Faro Island home off the coast of Sweden. Perhaps, like Max von Sydow's knight in The Seventh Seal, he cried out to a god "who must be somewhere." But one prefers to see him as the artist-juggler sees the knight in the haunting climax of that movie, dancing "away from the dawn" with a string of fellow travelers "while the rain washes their faces and clears the salt of the tears from their cheeks."
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NEWS
By Gerry Smith and Gerry Smith,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 24, 2007
Matthew Goetz wasn't surprised when he saw a photograph capturing a mysterious light at the Cobblestone Road Saloon. After all, Goetz, owner of the 148-year-old tavern in West Chicago, claims to have witnessed shadowy figures there a dozen times. "Maybe I'm nuts," he said, "but I've seen some things I can't explain." About one-third of Americans believe in ghosts and haunted houses, according to a 2005 Gallup poll. Such findings underscore the spiritual attraction to probing the unknown, said Jeff Belanger, who maintains the popular Web site Ghostvillage.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | April 30, 2007
Federal Hill's resident psychic didn't say a word to lure people into her blue tent - she just motioned them in with her hand. "I can tell they want to come in by their look," said Sylvia Eli, whose $5 palm readings were among the many attractions at the neighborhood's Spring Block Party yesterday. "I can tell they want to come in by their look," she said. "It's a gift." And here, near stands selling frozen margaritas by the blender-full and dripping cheese fries, they asked about love, ambition and wealth.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2004
For years, merchants and staff at Savage Mill have believed the place is haunted. Now Howard County Tourism Inc. is turning that into an asset for the 19th-century mill turned boutique shopping center. On Friday and Saturday nights through next month, the new Ghost Walks in Historic Savage Mill combines local history with tales of ghostly apparitions, unseen tricksters and unexplained occurrences. They also encourage visitors to shop and dine at the mill. It is a combination that has worked well in Ellicott City, where the tourism group's ghost tours have drawn approximately 4,000 people in the past year and where merchants saw ticket holders come in to redeem the discounts on the back of the passes.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
NEW YORK - In the end, the New York Yankees didn't look anything like the invincible machine that won three straight world titles a few years back. They just looked banged up and beaten. They might come back and win the American League East title again next year, but the young, fresh Florida Marlins made them look like yesterday's news with a six-game victory in the 99th World Series. What does it all mean? It means that 23-year-old Josh Beckett gets to go on the banquet circuit this winter and the Yankees get to spend the next few months dodging recriminations from volatile owner George Steinbrenner.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 8, 2003
Director Eric Schaeffer has said he was going for a haunting effect in his production of the James Goldman-Stephen Sondheim musical, Follies, at Signature Theatre, and there's no question that he has achieved it. This is an interpretation that's spooky from start to finish. Set designer Lou Stancari's environmental approach, replete with blackened walls and fallen beams, makes it look as if the Arlington, Va., theater is about to cave in around you. The production begins with the ghost light for illumination (the lighting is by Chris Lee)
FEATURES
By Greg Kot and Greg Kot,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 23, 2002
Now that Carlos Santana has rewritten the book on late-career comebacks, what does he do for an encore? The answer arrived yesterday with Shaman, the follow-up to the 1999 pop landmark Supernatural, which sold 25 million copies, spent two years on the Billboard 200 album chart (12 weeks at No. 1) and hauled in nine Grammy Awards. Supernatural was masterminded by longtime Santana mentor Clive Davis, who signed the guitarist to his original deal at Columbia Records more than 30 years ago. The album was designed to get Santana back on the charts by pairing him with a batch of contemporary hitmakers, regardless of how little they had in common with the guitarist's Latin-rock heritage: Matchbox Twenty's Rob Thomas, Wyclef Jean, Lauryn Hill, Everlast, Dave Matthews.
FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2002
The Simian Line Rated R (profanity, sexuality) SUN SCORE *** The curious title of Linda Yellen's The Simian Line, a blithe but tart romantic comedy with a supernatural twist, refers to what the dithery psychic Arnita (Tyne Daly) discovers when she reads the palm of her elegant neighbor Katharine (Lynn Redgrave). The line suggests that Katharine's heart and head are "tied up together" so that her head short-circuits the promptings of her heart. It is a painfully accurate reading of Katharine, a lovely, radiant woman who lives in a splendid turn-of-the-20th-century house on the promenade in Weehawken, N.J., which has a glorious view of the Manhattan skyline across the Hudson River.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clarinda Harriss and Clarinda Harriss,Special to the Sun | January 24, 1999
"Fear," by Irini Spanidou. Knopf. 182 pages. $21.Irini Spanidou's "Fear" involves at least two wonderful activities. Foremost, of course, is reading it. Please do so under the bedclothes, by flashlight -- if, like me, you can recall sneaking past the Young Adult section of the neighborhood library to secrete your flat-T-shirted self in a dim corner of Adult Fiction. Decades gone, the thrill returns.The second wonderful thing is trying to categorize this book. The project flashes one's whole life-as-a-reader before her. I say "her" because one category is certain: "Fear" is a woman's book, though, like many such, it would do a man a world of good to read it; indeed, one of the central issues is what it means to possess "the soul of a man."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 8, 1998
KissPsycho-Circus (314-558-912)When the four original members of Kiss announced two years ago that they were getting back together for a reunion tour, even die-hard fans figured that it would be a one-shot deal. Seeing Peter Criss, Ace Frehley, Paul Stanley and Gene Simmons playing all the oldies was one thing; imagining them back in the studio, working together on new songs, would be quite another.Yet, here they are, delivering their first new studio recording in almost 20 years. "Psycho-Circus" is classic Kiss in many ways, from the elaborate circus imagery of the CD package to the self-aggrandizing bombast of the songs themselves.
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