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By Scott Dance | May 4, 2012
Remember the “supermoon” of March 2011? The full moon appeared larger than usual because of its proximity to Earth. This month's full moon, known as the Full Flower Moon, could be almost as spectacular. That's because it will be nearly as close as it was last March. It will be about 250 miles further from Earth than the 221,000 mile-distance it was March 19, 2011. The moon's average distance from Earth is about 239,000 miles, according to EarthSky.org. The full moon arrives at 11:35 p.m. Saturday, within an hour of the moon's perigee.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
September's full moon arrives at 9:38 p.m. Monday , known as both the Corn and Harvest moon. American Indians named it the Corn moon for coinciding with the crop's harvest, whereas the Harvest moon can fall in September or October, depending on which full moon is closest to the autumnal equinox, Sept. 23 this year. It is the third of three consecutive "supermoons," as it coincides with lunar perigee, when the moon is closest to Earth in its orbit. Such a coincidence can make the moon look larger and brighter than when full moons are closer to apogee, their furthest point from Earth, though it can be hard to tell with the naked eye. The celestial wonders don't stop there -- next month's full moon is not far from being considered a supermoon, and it coincides with a lunar eclipse that can give the moon a reddish hue, dubbed a "Blood Moon.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
The Full Strawberry Moon arrives Sunday, and it will be a "supermoon" appearing larger than many other full moons. A supermoon is a full moon that coincides with the moon's perigee, or the point in its orbit at which it's closest to Earth. While the nickname makes it sound extraordinary, supermoons actually occur every year. They can appear more dramatic, however -- 14 percent larger and 30 percent brighter than when the moon is at apogee, furthest from Earth, according to EarthSky.org . "These changes do not come all of a sudden from month to month, however, and without anything with which to compare them, the changes in the moon's size or brightness are hard to quantify by simple observation," EarthSky adds.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
The largest full moon of 2014 rises Sunday, brightening the night sky just as the annual Perseid meteor shower peaks. The moon is full at 2:09 p.m. Sunday, rising at 7:54 p.m. in Baltimore. It's most commonly known as the Sturgeon Moon, and also as the Green Corn Moon and Grain Moon. It will appear slightly larger than normal, though it's hard to tell with the naked eye, because it coincides with the moon's perigee, when it is closest to Earth. It will be just shy of 222,000 miles away, more than 30,000 miles closer than when it reaches apogee, its furthest point from Earth.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 8, 2012
The coastal flood advisory that has been in effect for parts of the Chesapeake Bay the last two mornings is a result of the full moon and sustained winds, according to the National Weather Service. Tides a foot higher than normal are expected, and have already been seen in lower parts of the bay. The U.S. Naval Academy's first high tide was at 7:47 a.m., Fort McHenry's was at 9 a.m. and Havre de Grace's around noon. High tides are expected again at 7:51 p.m. in Annapolis, 9:26 p.m. at Fort McHenry, 10:18 p.m. at Bowley's Quarters and 12:46 a.m. at Havre de Grace.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
September's full moon arrives at 9:38 p.m. Monday , known as both the Corn and Harvest moon. American Indians named it the Corn moon for coinciding with the crop's harvest, whereas the Harvest moon can fall in September or October, depending on which full moon is closest to the autumnal equinox, Sept. 23 this year. It is the third of three consecutive "supermoons," as it coincides with lunar perigee, when the moon is closest to Earth in its orbit. Such a coincidence can make the moon look larger and brighter than when full moons are closer to apogee, their furthest point from Earth, though it can be hard to tell with the naked eye. The celestial wonders don't stop there -- next month's full moon is not far from being considered a supermoon, and it coincides with a lunar eclipse that can give the moon a reddish hue, dubbed a "Blood Moon.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
July's full moon arrives Monday night -- the "Full Thunder Moon" to many, appropriately enough given the weather this time of year. The moon is technically "full" at 2:16 p.m., so it will be slightly past that maximum brightness when it rises at 8:12 p.m. It will stay out until 5:51 a.m. Some other names for July's full moon are the Full Buck Moon, because around now is when new antlers begin to appear in male deer, and the Full Hay Moon, according...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
We may be only a few weeks removed from the summer solstice, but Earth reaches the furthest point from the sun in its annual orbit on Friday. The phenomenon is known as aphelion. The opposite, perihelion, when Earth is closest to the sun, occurred Jan 2. Because orbits have an elliptical shape, Earth's distance from the sun varies, just as the moon's distance from the Earth varies (creating last month's "Supermoon"). It may seem strange that Earth is at its furthest from the sun when it is hottest here in the Northern Hemisphere, but the seasons are linked to the planet's tilt on its axis.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
The largest full moon of 2014 rises Sunday, brightening the night sky just as the annual Perseid meteor shower peaks. The moon is full at 2:09 p.m. Sunday, rising at 7:54 p.m. in Baltimore. It's most commonly known as the Sturgeon Moon, and also as the Green Corn Moon and Grain Moon. It will appear slightly larger than normal, though it's hard to tell with the naked eye, because it coincides with the moon's perigee, when it is closest to Earth. It will be just shy of 222,000 miles away, more than 30,000 miles closer than when it reaches apogee, its furthest point from Earth.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
The full moon arrives Saturday morning, and it is the first of three in a row that can be considered a "supermoon. " The moon reaches fullness at 7:25 a.m. Saturday, so it should appear most full Friday night but also large and bright on Saturday night. It is known as the Full Buck Moon or Thunder Moon. This year, it can also be known as a supermoon because the centers of the Earth and moon are about 225,000 miles apart. The next two full moons will get progressively larger, with the closest in August, according to EarthSky.org.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
The full moon arrives Saturday morning, and it is the first of three in a row that can be considered a "supermoon. " The moon reaches fullness at 7:25 a.m. Saturday, so it should appear most full Friday night but also large and bright on Saturday night. It is known as the Full Buck Moon or Thunder Moon. This year, it can also be known as a supermoon because the centers of the Earth and moon are about 225,000 miles apart. The next two full moons will get progressively larger, with the closest in August, according to EarthSky.org.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
July's full moon arrives Monday night -- the "Full Thunder Moon" to many, appropriately enough given the weather this time of year. The moon is technically "full" at 2:16 p.m., so it will be slightly past that maximum brightness when it rises at 8:12 p.m. It will stay out until 5:51 a.m. Some other names for July's full moon are the Full Buck Moon, because around now is when new antlers begin to appear in male deer, and the Full Hay Moon, according...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
We may be only a few weeks removed from the summer solstice, but Earth reaches the furthest point from the sun in its annual orbit on Friday. The phenomenon is known as aphelion. The opposite, perihelion, when Earth is closest to the sun, occurred Jan 2. Because orbits have an elliptical shape, Earth's distance from the sun varies, just as the moon's distance from the Earth varies (creating last month's "Supermoon"). It may seem strange that Earth is at its furthest from the sun when it is hottest here in the Northern Hemisphere, but the seasons are linked to the planet's tilt on its axis.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
The Full Strawberry Moon arrives Sunday, and it will be a "supermoon" appearing larger than many other full moons. A supermoon is a full moon that coincides with the moon's perigee, or the point in its orbit at which it's closest to Earth. While the nickname makes it sound extraordinary, supermoons actually occur every year. They can appear more dramatic, however -- 14 percent larger and 30 percent brighter than when the moon is at apogee, furthest from Earth, according to EarthSky.org . "These changes do not come all of a sudden from month to month, however, and without anything with which to compare them, the changes in the moon's size or brightness are hard to quantify by simple observation," EarthSky adds.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 8, 2012
The coastal flood advisory that has been in effect for parts of the Chesapeake Bay the last two mornings is a result of the full moon and sustained winds, according to the National Weather Service. Tides a foot higher than normal are expected, and have already been seen in lower parts of the bay. The U.S. Naval Academy's first high tide was at 7:47 a.m., Fort McHenry's was at 9 a.m. and Havre de Grace's around noon. High tides are expected again at 7:51 p.m. in Annapolis, 9:26 p.m. at Fort McHenry, 10:18 p.m. at Bowley's Quarters and 12:46 a.m. at Havre de Grace.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 4, 2012
Remember the “supermoon” of March 2011? The full moon appeared larger than usual because of its proximity to Earth. This month's full moon, known as the Full Flower Moon, could be almost as spectacular. That's because it will be nearly as close as it was last March. It will be about 250 miles further from Earth than the 221,000 mile-distance it was March 19, 2011. The moon's average distance from Earth is about 239,000 miles, according to EarthSky.org. The full moon arrives at 11:35 p.m. Saturday, within an hour of the moon's perigee.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 2, 2012
Clouds blocked our view of the recent Lyrid meteor shower, but there is another chance to see “shooting stars” this weekend. The Eta Aquarids are expected to peak in the early mornings of Saturday and Sunday. The meteors come from a cloud of debris left behind by Halley's Comet, according to NASA. While the famous comet only comes by once every 76 years, twice a year Earth passes through its debris, for the Aquarids in May and the Orionids in October. The meteor shower is best viewed from the southern hemisphere, according to NASA, but provides a show up north here, too. Watch for them in the southwest sky before dawn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | November 1, 2007
She gets celestial this time. On Supermoon -- the new album by Marie Daulne, the musical globe-trotter better known as Zap Mama -- the Congolese-Belgian singer wanted to make a personal statement. The title is a reflection of the way she sees herself and the trajectory of her career. The artist isn't trying to be just another star. "Supermoon is be true to yourself as opposed to being a superstar," Daulne says. "Superstar is a fake reality. There's one moon, which means I'm one, I'm unique.
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