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By Greg Barrett and Greg Barrett,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2005
The brief life of Philip Eugene Parker Jr. was celebrated yesterday with laughs, tears and draft beer at the waterfront bar where his mother occasionally seeks solace - an elusive feeling ever since her son was killed in the pitch dark of a prison bus. John Lennon's "Beautiful Boy" played, and 20 balloons were released in memory of Parker's 20 hard years of living. Also, a white dove was released to express the hope that in death Parker found something he never had in life: peace. "Sweet and troubled and confused" is the way Parker's mother described him. "He was my gentle giant," Melissa Rodriguez said of her second-born son, a muscular 6-foot-6, 240-pound Baltimore man who would have turned 21 tomorrow.
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NEWS
By Greg Barrett and Greg Barrett,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2005
The brief life of Philip Eugene Parker Jr. was celebrated yesterday with laughs, tears and draft beer at the waterfront bar where his mother occasionally seeks solace - an elusive feeling ever since her son was killed in the pitch dark of a prison bus. John Lennon's "Beautiful Boy" played, and 20 balloons were released in memory of Parker's 20 hard years of living. Also, a white dove was released to express the hope that in death Parker found something he never had in life: peace. "Sweet and troubled and confused" is the way Parker's mother described him. "He was my gentle giant," Melissa Rodriguez said of her second-born son, a muscular 6-foot-6, 240-pound Baltimore man who would have turned 21 tomorrow.
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NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
Harold Benjamin Dean -- the first convict to escape from Maryland's "Supermax" prison -- was among the five inmates accused in an attempted breakout from another maximum-security facility this week, authorities said yesterday. The convicts -- all serving life terms for murder or robbery -- had 242 feet of nylon-braided rope, a grappling hook with a 3-foot curved steel rod, and a pair of toenail clippers, said Lt. Priscilla Doggett, spokeswoman for the state Division of Correction. She was unable to confirm accounts given to The Sun by two corrections officers that the inmates also had a pulley, mountain-climbing rings, hacksaw blades and a rope-ladder with socks tied as rungs.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2003
In a recognition that get-tough prison policies have failed to prevent repeat offenders, the Ehrlich administration announced yesterday a shift toward rehabilitation, proposing programs to educate inmates and improve their behavior. But with the state facing a revenue shortfall, all but $2 million of the annual cost would be financed by juggling the correctional payroll over the next three years - filling an expected 218 correctional officer vacancies with 210 teachers, counselors and social workers, a tactic that also would avoid layoffs.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2000
Gregory L. Lawrence asked a panel of judges yesterday to shave time off his six-year sentence for a movie-like prison escape last year, saying the added time would be an impediment to his hoped-for parole from a life term for murder -- or exoneration in the crime. Lawrence, 39, of Baltimore told a three-judge Anne Arundel Circuit Court panel that he has been wrongly imprisoned since 1978 and that Gov. Parris N. Glendening's policy of denying parole to murderers has unfairly turned his life sentence into life without parole.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2003
In a recognition that get-tough prison policies have failed to prevent repeat offenders, the Ehrlich administration announced yesterday a shift toward rehabilitation, proposing programs to educate inmates and improve their behavior. But with the state facing a revenue shortfall, all but $2 million of the annual cost would be financed by juggling the correctional payroll over the next three years - filling an expected 218 correctional officer vacancies with 210 teachers, counselors and social workers, a tactic that also would avoid layoffs.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1999
Facing a potentially contentious legislative hearing, prison officials announced disciplinary action yesterday against four more corrections officers whose negligence contributed to the recent escape of two inmates from a Jessup prison.The firing of another guard, the demotion of a captain to lieutenant and written reprimands of a major and another corrections officer complete the internal disciplinary review at the Maryland Correctional Institution, officials said.That brought to nine the number of officers disciplined or transferred as a result of the May 18 escape.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2000
Despite a substantial stash of equipment, five convicted killers and robbers had little chance of escaping the maximum-security Maryland House of Correction Annex last week, prison officials said. Division of Correction Commissioner William W. Sondervan said Friday that the inmates -- including Harold Dean, who has escaped from Maryland's Supermax prison -- had rappeling gear, ropes, a hacksaw blade, and -- just in case -- adhesive bandages. "This is not that unusual," Sondervan said of the materials they had accumulated: 242 feet of nylon-braided rope weighted with a padlock, another rope with socks tied along its length to make climbing easier, a small hacksaw blade, grappling hooks to attach to rings for sliding down ropes, heavy-duty gloves, nail clippers, alcohol swabs and aspirin.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1995
The state prison built to hold the "worst of the worst" Maryland criminals is being investigated by the U.S. Department of Justice after complaints of harassment and beatings of inmates and other cruel conditions.Justice Department spokeswoman Lee P. Douglass confirmed the investigation of the Maryland Correctional Adjustment Center, known as Supermax. She said lawyers from the department's civil rights division had received "numerous" complaints, but she would not describe them or say who made them.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 4, 2000
More than 100 people rallied yesterday outside the state's Supermax prison in Baltimore to demand that Gov. Parris N. Glendening stop the planned execution this month of convicted murderer Eugene Colvin-el. Protesters carried signs saying "Capital Punishment Is Cold-Blooded Murder" and "Capital Punishment Means Them Without the Capital Get the Punishment." Speakers denounced the death penalty as arbitrary and racially discriminatory. Colvin-el, Maryland's oldest death-row inmate at 55, was convicted in the 1980 slaying of Lena S. Buckman, who was stabbed 28 times in her daughter's Pikesville home.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2000
An inmate in Maryland's most secure prison, known as "Supermax," was fatally stabbed six times in the chest early yesterday during an altercation in an indoor recreation area, state police said. Michael Allen, 20, who was serving five years for attempted murder, was pronounced dead at 10:40 a.m. in the prison infirmary. The attack occurred about 10:15 a.m. inside the downtown complex on East Madison Street, where 309 inmates are held in isolated cells. Prison officials said the slaying is the first at Supermax since it opened in 1989 to hold the state's most dangerous detainees.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 4, 2000
More than 100 people rallied yesterday outside the state's Supermax prison in Baltimore to demand that Gov. Parris N. Glendening stop the planned execution this month of convicted murderer Eugene Colvin-el. Protesters carried signs saying "Capital Punishment Is Cold-Blooded Murder" and "Capital Punishment Means Them Without the Capital Get the Punishment." Speakers denounced the death penalty as arbitrary and racially discriminatory. Colvin-el, Maryland's oldest death-row inmate at 55, was convicted in the 1980 slaying of Lena S. Buckman, who was stabbed 28 times in her daughter's Pikesville home.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2000
Despite a substantial stash of equipment, five convicted killers and robbers had little chance of escaping the maximum-security Maryland House of Correction Annex last week, prison officials said. Division of Correction Commissioner William W. Sondervan said Friday that the inmates -- including Harold Dean, who has escaped from Maryland's Supermax prison -- had rappeling gear, ropes, a hacksaw blade, and -- just in case -- adhesive bandages. "This is not that unusual," Sondervan said of the materials they had accumulated: 242 feet of nylon-braided rope weighted with a padlock, another rope with socks tied along its length to make climbing easier, a small hacksaw blade, grappling hooks to attach to rings for sliding down ropes, heavy-duty gloves, nail clippers, alcohol swabs and aspirin.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
Harold Benjamin Dean -- the first convict to escape from Maryland's "Supermax" prison -- was among the five inmates accused in an attempted breakout from another maximum-security facility this week, authorities said yesterday. The convicts -- all serving life terms for murder or robbery -- had 242 feet of nylon-braided rope, a grappling hook with a 3-foot curved steel rod, and a pair of toenail clippers, said Lt. Priscilla Doggett, spokeswoman for the state Division of Correction. She was unable to confirm accounts given to The Sun by two corrections officers that the inmates also had a pulley, mountain-climbing rings, hacksaw blades and a rope-ladder with socks tied as rungs.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2000
Gregory L. Lawrence asked a panel of judges yesterday to shave time off his six-year sentence for a movie-like prison escape last year, saying the added time would be an impediment to his hoped-for parole from a life term for murder -- or exoneration in the crime. Lawrence, 39, of Baltimore told a three-judge Anne Arundel Circuit Court panel that he has been wrongly imprisoned since 1978 and that Gov. Parris N. Glendening's policy of denying parole to murderers has unfairly turned his life sentence into life without parole.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1999
A federal jury found yesterday that a group of guards violated the civil rights of a former inmate at Maryland's Supermax prison when they placed him in special leg and hand irons in the prison's now-closed "pink room" isolation cell for disruptive prisoners.Jurors awarded Quentin L. Jackson $9,501 in compensatory and punitive damages from five correctional officers.After a four-day trial in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, the jury found that the guards acted improperly when they placed Jackson in shackles in the isolation cell.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1999
A federal jury found yesterday that a group of guards violated the civil rights of a former inmate at Maryland's Supermax prison when they placed him in special leg and hand irons in the prison's now-closed "pink room" isolation cell for disruptive prisoners.Jurors awarded Quentin L. Jackson $9,501 in compensatory and punitive damages from five correctional officers.After a four-day trial in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, the jury found that the guards acted improperly when they placed Jackson in shackles in the isolation cell.
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