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By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1999
After three weeks, the anxiety and jitters are gone. The soon-to-be third-graders dedicating their summer to SuperKids Camp are deep into its two R's: reading and recreation.Each week carries a theme. At Federal Hill Elementary -- one of 17 SuperKids Camps in Baltimore -- the 70 participating children started with "Core Values," focusing on respect, honesty, caring and responsibility. Then followed Hawaiian-related "Aloha Week," including lots of pineapple and leis.Last week, the campers celebrated multiculturalism, with books and art projects concerning various cultures.
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NEWS
May 19, 2007
Six correctional officers at the Patuxent Institution remain on medical leave after a fight Wednesday night at the Jessup facility involving 10 inmates that sent 10 officers to the hospital, the institution's spokeswoman said yesterday. The facility, which offers drug and psychiatric rehabilitation to about 775 offenders, was locked down after the fight until yesterday morning, said spokeswoman Judy West. Wednesday's incident began as a fight between two inmates during dinner and grew to involve other inmates in one of the facility's four wings, West said.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1998
Center Stage was set yesterday for work and play: the opening of SuperKids Camp, an eight-week summer program aimed at strengthening the reading skills of almost 2,000 city schoolchildren.And despite the challenge of organizing buses, supplies and meals for 20 sites, Sally Michel, the dreamer and doer behind the camp scene, appeared almost as cool as Gary Cooper at high noon."It's happening, it's actually happening," said Michel, as she visited Center Stage and several other locations to orchestrate logistics for the camp she founded last year, open only to 7- and 8-year-olds in the summer between second and third grade.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2001
As the 60-foot racing yachts competing in the 8,000-mile EDS Atlantic Challenge slowly sailed out of Baltimore's Inner Harbor yesterday, they provided a grand backdrop to a decidedly more modest regatta: A wobbly line of 21-foot boats steering through a simple buoy course, each vessel crewed by a team of soon-to-be third- and fourth-graders who before had barely seen Baltimore from the vantage of its waters, let alone dabbled in sailing. Their immersion was part of a goal far more fundamental than mastering the water.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
THIS IS TURNING out to be the Summer of the First R.In Northeast Baltimore, 3,200 teachers are going to summer school to learn how to employ the city's new elementary reading curriculum.Community activist Sally Michel's SuperKids camps open this week for about 1,500 children, some of the more than 4,000 city second-graders who tested below grade level in reading in September.Their instructors, trained over the past few weeks, will work at 19 sites around Baltimore. Most are delightful reminders of the idealistic 1960s -- young college students participating in the America Reads program.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
Squinting in concentration, Cameron Faulkner-Walker pencils in answers on a work sheet. The eraser on his pencil has had it, and so has he.Cameron, 7, knows he has to tackle reading harder than the others in his SuperKids Camp group, but says he doesn't mind. He practices at home so that when he starts the third grade in the fall, he'll be caught up.That's the goal of the eight-week camp, which has passed its halfway mark. More than 1,700 Baltimore children who will start third grade in the fall, including Cameron and 64 others at Federal Hill Elementary School, are participating at 16 sites around the city.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2000
The signs tell the story these days at SuperKids in the Old Town Mall: "Store Closing Sale!" "Everything Must Go!" "All Sales Final." More than a half-century since it opened in the 500 block of Gay St., the children's clothing store is going out of business. It is fresh evidence of Old Town's continuing decline. SuperKids survived riots and urban renewal. While other stores went out of business, the shop's customers remained loyal. They brought pictures of their children all dressed up in Sunday best bought at the store.
NEWS
March 8, 1999
HOW ARE you spending your summer vacation? In March, the question seems ridiculously premature. Yet within the next few weeks the Maryland legislature will decide whether hundreds of struggling Baltimore students will spend next summer getting the reading help they need to bolster their lagging reading skills.Gov. Parris N. Glendening has proposed spending $1 million in state funds to send an extra 1,000 low-performing Baltimore students to SuperKids Camp. This eight-week program combines intensive reading instruction with the swimming, crafts classes and zoo trips found at more traditional camps.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1999
They've looked at outer space through a telescope, cruised the Inner Harbor by sailboat, and even flown -- on ropes, anyway -- in Baltimore's Leakin Park.Most important, the 70 children enrolled at SuperKids Camp's Federal Hill Elementary School site have completed their real work: daily 90-minute reading sessions for the past seven weeks.Well-deserving of the title "SuperKids," now they're ready to dedicate their last week of the grant-funded program to overnight camping trips, parties and graduation.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1999
The summer fun is over.Daily field trips, splashing in a pool, museum-hopping -- it all ended last week with graduation ceremonies for the 70 SuperKids Camp youngsters at Baltimore's Federal Hill Elementary School, and hundreds more at 16 other camp sites.But one thing the campers at Federal Hill Elementary School will be able to take with them as a new school year dawns is a new attitude about reading."Reading was fun before, but now it's better," said Josh Millward, 8, after the SuperKids Camp closing ceremonies Thursday.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2000
The signs tell the story these days at SuperKids in the Old Town Mall: "Store Closing Sale!" "Everything Must Go!" "All Sales Final." More than a half-century since it opened in the 500 block of Gay St., the children's clothing store is going out of business. It is fresh evidence of Old Town's continuing decline. SuperKids survived riots and urban renewal. While other stores went out of business, the shop's customers remained loyal. They brought pictures of their children all dressed up in Sunday best bought at the store.
NEWS
By J. Kimball C. Payne and J. Kimball C. Payne,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2000
Most college students measure the rewards of their summer jobs in future recommendations or dollars and cents. But for the 60 college students teaching this summer at Baltimore's SuperKids Camp, it is the little things that make their efforts worthwhile. In its fourth year, the camp's 20 sites give city second-, third- and fourth-graders a summer boost and a head start on the school year. With less than a week remaining in the six-week course, the counselors measure their success in small moments.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1999
The summer fun is over.Daily field trips, splashing in a pool, museum-hopping -- it all ended last week with graduation ceremonies for the 70 SuperKids Camp youngsters at Baltimore's Federal Hill Elementary School, and hundreds more at 16 other camp sites.But one thing the campers at Federal Hill Elementary School will be able to take with them as a new school year dawns is a new attitude about reading."Reading was fun before, but now it's better," said Josh Millward, 8, after the SuperKids Camp closing ceremonies Thursday.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1999
They've looked at outer space through a telescope, cruised the Inner Harbor by sailboat, and even flown -- on ropes, anyway -- in Baltimore's Leakin Park.Most important, the 70 children enrolled at SuperKids Camp's Federal Hill Elementary School site have completed their real work: daily 90-minute reading sessions for the past seven weeks.Well-deserving of the title "SuperKids," now they're ready to dedicate their last week of the grant-funded program to overnight camping trips, parties and graduation.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
Squinting in concentration, Cameron Faulkner-Walker pencils in answers on a work sheet. The eraser on his pencil has had it, and so has he.Cameron, 7, knows he has to tackle reading harder than the others in his SuperKids Camp group, but says he doesn't mind. He practices at home so that when he starts the third grade in the fall, he'll be caught up.That's the goal of the eight-week camp, which has passed its halfway mark. More than 1,700 Baltimore children who will start third grade in the fall, including Cameron and 64 others at Federal Hill Elementary School, are participating at 16 sites around the city.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1999
After three weeks, the anxiety and jitters are gone. The soon-to-be third-graders dedicating their summer to SuperKids Camp are deep into its two R's: reading and recreation.Each week carries a theme. At Federal Hill Elementary -- one of 17 SuperKids Camps in Baltimore -- the 70 participating children started with "Core Values," focusing on respect, honesty, caring and responsibility. Then followed Hawaiian-related "Aloha Week," including lots of pineapple and leis.Last week, the campers celebrated multiculturalism, with books and art projects concerning various cultures.
NEWS
June 29, 1993
North Arundel Hospital plans Camp SuperkidsIn conjunction with the American Lung Association, North Arundel Hospital is sponsoring "Camp Superkids" day camp for asthmatic children at Anne Arundel Community College.Camp Superkids offers asthmatic children ages 6 to 12 a chance to gain physical confidence and a better understanding of asthma.The camp, held at the Anne Arundel Community College, runs from from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. from Aug. 2-6.Respiratory therapists from the hospital, pediatric nurses and junior volunteers will direct events that combine asthma education and recreational activities such as crafts, games and swimming.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | July 4, 1999
Toni Yowell started camp for the very first time last week. Nervous at first, by the second day, the 7-year-old was boasting that she was no longer shy.Walking through the Maryland Science Center, Toni trailed a group of other campers, wide-eyed at the colorful sights of the solar system. A few hours earlier, she and 75 others were engaged in another activity -- sounding out words, reading in unison, and following with their fingers in brand new textbooks at Federal Hill Elementary School.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | July 4, 1999
Toni Yowell started camp for the very first time last week. Nervous at first, by the second day, the 7-year-old was boasting that she was no longer shy.Walking through the Maryland Science Center, Toni trailed a group of other campers, wide-eyed at the colorful sights of the solar system. A few hours earlier, she and 75 others were engaged in another activity -- sounding out words, reading in unison, and following with their fingers in brand new textbooks at Federal Hill Elementary School.
NEWS
March 8, 1999
HOW ARE you spending your summer vacation? In March, the question seems ridiculously premature. Yet within the next few weeks the Maryland legislature will decide whether hundreds of struggling Baltimore students will spend next summer getting the reading help they need to bolster their lagging reading skills.Gov. Parris N. Glendening has proposed spending $1 million in state funds to send an extra 1,000 low-performing Baltimore students to SuperKids Camp. This eight-week program combines intensive reading instruction with the swimming, crafts classes and zoo trips found at more traditional camps.
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