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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | October 27, 2011
Joe Flacco didn't come to the Ravens' rescue Monday night. As poorly as the Ravens' offense played in the 12-7 loss to the Jacksonville Jaguars, Flacco still got his opportunity to step into a phone booth, wiggle into his superhero tights and carry the team on a last-minute, game-winning, mistake-cover-upping touchdown drive. Flacco was no superhero Monday night, but this week, two writers for the blog “ This Given Sunday ” compared each NFL starting quarterback to a superhero.
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NEWS
By Nicholas Edler | May 1, 2014
In the new Marvel movie, "Captain America: The Winter Soldier," Captain America (Played by Chris Evans) is seen coolly riding his new Harley-Davidson on the streets of D.C. While watching this, I can only think of one thing: Where is Captain America's helmet? I am an intensive care unit nurse at the University of Maryland Medical Center, the first trauma hospital in the world. We regularly see motorcyclists survive devastating crashes if for no other reason because they were wearing a helmet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Doug Nye and Doug Nye,Knight-Ridder | June 19, 1992
Three years ago "Batman" was the box-office hit of the summer.LTC Then, in an unprecedented move, Warner Bros. decided to put it on video just five months after its theatrical release. Normally it takes a year to 18 months for a big moneymaker to slip into the home video market.Not surprisingly, the "Batman" video, priced at $24.95, became one of the hottest sellers in history.Today, "Batman Returns" will swoop into movie theaters around the country, and it, too, is expected to rack up millions of dollars in ticket sales.
FEATURES
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2012
The choice was not between Batman and Superman. It wasn't even between the Caped Crusader and an X-person. No, it wasn't a superhero-superhero fight. Bruce Wayne's alterego just barely beat out a daytime TV talkshow host. It was either Batman undies or Ellen Degeneres-themed briefs, said Mark Harvey, the truck driver who ran out onto the field during the Orioles' opening home game. The 26-year-old Severn man originally planned to wear "ellen" undershorts for the diamond dash, Harvey said Thursday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Makeba Scott Hunter and Makeba Scott Hunter,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
If you haven't noticed, lately superheroes have taken to the big screen like, well, a bat to a cave. These childhood idols and protectors of the universe have come charging back from the dusty comic book shelf to save the world or, at the very least, the movie industry. The familiar faces of Batman, Spiderman, the X-Men and, most recently, the Hulk have all taken a turn mesmerizing movie audiences with over-the-top special effects, daredevil antics and witty one-liners while saving the world from injustice and evil in just two hours.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach and Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporters | May 2, 2008
Even more than his love of gadgets, more than his appreciation of the comic-book ethos that inspired Iron Man, director Jon Favreau's success in bringing the Marvel Comics superhero to the big screen came down to his success as a mediator. Consider the creative forces he had to bring together. There was Iron Man himself, Robert Downey Jr., an actor of unquestioned talent and commanding presence, but one weighed down by a personal life that hasn't always been his greatest asset. There were the folks at Marvel Comics, gatekeepers of the Iron Man mythology since his creation in 1963, who were bankrolling their first movie (after depending on others for such mega-franchises as Spider-Man, X-Men and Fantastic Four)
FEATURES
By Rachel Abramowitz and Rachel Abramowitz,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 3, 2004
EMERYVILLE, Calif. - Poor Bob Parr. Not too long into the opening of the new animated film The Incredibles, the man formerly known as the superhero Mr. Incredible has become a faceless corporate drone - consigned to the quietly humiliating life of a powerless insurance adjuster. Driven by skyrocketing malpractice claims into a witness protection program for superheroes, his once fabulous physique has gone to seed, his spirit has deflated and he's literally squished into a tiny office chair where his days are ruled by the mercurial whims of a Nazi bean counter.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | October 7, 2009
No one has ever told 7-year-old Dominic Osorio that he has brain cancer. Instead, his mother devised a story and made him the lead character. When Dominic undergoes surgery, chemotherapy or radiation, he is not a patient; he is the Dominator, waging war with an evil enemy that he calls a megazoid. His grandmother, Monique Spagna, recalled the day Dominic finished weeks of daily radiation treatments at Johns Hopkins Children's Center that required the Bel Air boy to wear a mask and remain motionless for what seemed an eternity to a child.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 7, 2005
In July 1966, Marvel's Fantastic Four became the first comic book to introduce a recurring black superhero - an African monarch who assumed the identity of an animal revered in his kingdom, The Black Panther. So it's fitting that in July 2005, Fantastic Four has become the first big-budget superhero movie to boast a black director - Tim Story, a 35-year-old graduate of Los Angeles' Westchester High School and film school at the University of Southern California. Just three years ago, Story, with no major credits to his name, demonstrated a killer instinct for ensemble comedy and neighborhood culture in a sleeper smash called Barbershop.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | July 2, 2008
Hancock , the redemption tale of a feckless Los Angeles superhero, is named, in a roundabout way, for John Hancock, the patriot with the indelible signature. But it might as well have been named for the insurance company. The first half is diverting and inventive. But the filmmakers use the second half as a box-office insurance policy. They fill it with the conventional super-heroics and heartbreak that they spend the first 45 minutes gleefully deconstructing. Hancock swings into action in ragged street clothes: Tthe only "costume" he wears is a wool watch cap with an eagle stitched into the front of it. Mostly he sports 10 different kinds of grimaces as he demonstrates super-strength, the power of flight and an ultra-blase attitude to any piece of machinery or property that gets in his way. Happily, Will Smith is just as creative and persuasive as a homeless superman as he was playing the homeless businessman in The Pursuit of Happyness.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | October 27, 2011
Joe Flacco didn't come to the Ravens' rescue Monday night. As poorly as the Ravens' offense played in the 12-7 loss to the Jacksonville Jaguars, Flacco still got his opportunity to step into a phone booth, wiggle into his superhero tights and carry the team on a last-minute, game-winning, mistake-cover-upping touchdown drive. Flacco was no superhero Monday night, but this week, two writers for the blog “ This Given Sunday ” compared each NFL starting quarterback to a superhero.
SHOPPING
by Carson Porter | August 24, 2011
Arkham Asylum changed the expectations for what a superhero game could be, just like Dark Knight did with superhero movies. I can't wait to see if their follow-ups (Arkham City and Dark Knight Rises) can manage to meet those expectations.   Both are coming out relatively soon; Arkham City is only two months away. You know you're going to buy it anyway, so why not preorder it now at NewEgg and save $12? Use coupon code EMCKBHG95 at checkout to get discount. Only valid for newsletter subscribers, so make sure you sign up for that first.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Jeremy Adams has two parties planned for his Federal Hill comics store this month. One will celebrate this weekend's annual convergence of the comics world on Charm City. The other will anticipate a risky, game-changing strategy that could determine the shape — and vitality — of that world for years to come. On Friday, Adams' Alliance Comics will be the scene of a party in honor of the 12th Baltimore Comic Con, a two-day comics bacchanal held this weekend at the Baltimore Convention Center, where thousands of retailers, artists and fans get to immerse themselves in everything having to do with the medium they adore.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | June 20, 2011
Superman, Batman, Spider-Man and other superheroes have flown across so many movie screens in recent years that it's enough to give an air traffic controller a headache. The latest such do-gooder, "Green Lantern," does not even fly as high as a similarly colored superhero, "The Green Hornet," who flew through as recently as a few months ago. Part of the problem is that "Green Lantern" has never had a very strong grip on the pop-cultural imagination. Although this green-hued comic book figure has been around for decades, he definitely seems like a second-tier superhero.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2011
Here's the difference between Paul Day and the rest of the world: Where most people see a broken-down ATV on the side of an interstate, Day sees a Transformer. Not only does he see it, but he turns it into one. Which is why, unlike the average citizen, he's an award-winning creator of superhero costumes. "Yeah, I found parts of Bumblebee on the side of I-95," says Day, 45, whose take on the most outgoing of the Transformers, that alien race that can turn themselves into motor vehicles, won 2009's inaugural Baltimore Comic-Con costume contest.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare , mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | December 4, 2009
A Harford County restaurant manager is continuing his efforts to assist families coping with childhood cancer by holding a superhero event in Bel Air on Saturday. The Dominator, a character inspired by one child's battle with a brain tumor, will take part in an ice cream social and fundraiser from noon to 5 p.m. at Moore's Candies at 138 N. Bond St. Children will receive a free scoop of ice cream and visit with the red-suited superhero. Members of the Bel Air Volunteer Fire Company will be on hand at 3:30 p.m. with their mascot and several giveaways.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN REPORTER | June 3, 2008
It started when he was a boy. It didn't matter that he was the son of a state cop. He had a name that could be made fun of - so the other boys, being boys, did just that, often with the accompanying theme song. Nun-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh BATMAN! For Ronald S. Bateman, the teasing never really let up. It followed him, off and on, through high school in Annapolis, through training as a cadet, through 23 years with the Anne Arundel County Police Department and three more as chief deputy in the Anne Arundel Sheriff's Office.
SHOPPING
by Carson Porter | August 24, 2011
Arkham Asylum changed the expectations for what a superhero game could be, just like Dark Knight did with superhero movies. I can't wait to see if their follow-ups (Arkham City and Dark Knight Rises) can manage to meet those expectations.   Both are coming out relatively soon; Arkham City is only two months away. You know you're going to buy it anyway, so why not preorder it now at NewEgg and save $12? Use coupon code EMCKBHG95 at checkout to get discount. Only valid for newsletter subscribers, so make sure you sign up for that first.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | November 14, 2009
Dominic Osorio, a Bel Air first-grader whose battle with brain cancer inspired a superhero comic book, died Friday of the disease at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. The 7-year-old loved school, superheroes and his big sister Kristina. "Dominic was a great kid, a real trouper who fought until his last breath," said his grandmother Monique Spagna of Bel Air. "He is cradled in God's arms now." While Nicole Spagna's son was hospitalized and unable to communicate these past two months, she rarely left his side.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 8, 2009
Should Spider-Man and Batman be seen riding the light rail this weekend, don't be alarmed. Baltimore Comic-Con is in town, with a hook that should attract even more of a costumed crowd than usual. Instead of just getting stared at or having her picture taken incessantly, this year's Supergirl could win $1,000. "So many people come dressed up anyway, on their own," says convention organizer Marc Nathan, who's eager to see how many Supermen, Wonder Women and Fantastic Fours will show, attracted by the convention's first-ever costume contest.
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