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Tim Wheeler | March 13, 2012
After years of investigation and some limited cleanup, an old Dundalk area dumping ground containing toxic wastes is due for federal attention now. The Environmental Protection Agency announced today (3/13) that it is adding the Sauer Dump to the National Priorities List, also known as Superfund , because the soil and wetland sediment on the 2.5-acre site contain high concentrations of lead, PCBs and other hazardous chemicals. The partly wooded tract on Back River was originally marshland that was filled in by a past owner, according to EPA. Toxic substances were deposited there while it operated as a dump from the 1960s through the 1980s. A number of homes are nearby.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
After nearly a dozen years, $16 million and the removal of some 50,000 tons of contaminated dirt, the Coast Guard declared the Superfund site at the Coast Guard Yard south of Baltimore cleaned and ready for duty Thursday. The yard landed on the Superfund list — a national registry of sites designated for federally supervised cleanup — after a century of building and repairing ships. Blasting paint off ships, storing oil and batteries, burning waste and dumping bilge left the ground polluted with dioxin, pesticides, metals, PCBs and other contaminants — some of which spilled into nearby Arundel Cove and Curtis Creek.
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NEWS
March 3, 1994
There's little doubt that the Superfund hazardous waste program has generated too many lawsuits and too few cleanups in its 14 years. Only 15 percent of the nearly 1,300 sites officially identified as health risks have been decontaminated. Half the $13.5 billion spent by government and business on projects has gone for litigation and administration.In large measure, that miserable result is the legacy of the Reagan tenure: an environmental administration that strove to let big bucks polluters off the hook, the ensuing backlash by Congress to impose rigid, extreme requirements that denied flexible settlements and thus escalated the level of legal action over liability.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
For nearly 30 years, local, state and federal authorities have wrestled with what to do about an old dump in North Point that's been leaking toxic waste into nearby wetlands and Back River. On Tuesday, the Environmental Protection Agency declared the Sauer Dump a Superfund site, making it a priority for a federally supervised cleanup. When it will finally get cleaned up, though, remains an open question. An EPA spokesman said more investigation is needed and couldn't say when work might begin to deal with the contaminants lurking in the soil and sediments.
NEWS
By Jean-Michel Cousteau | July 12, 1993
THIRTEEN years ago, a mechanism was put in place to force polluters in the United States to pay for the cleanup of their own toxic legacy. The so-called Superfund was hailed as a victory not only for the environment, but for the taxpayer, who would no longer be obliged to absorb the high costs of environmentally unsound practices. Now, according to an Associated Press review, Superfund appears to have failed in its quest for environmental justice. And once again, the taxpayer is the loser.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1994
The Maryland Department of the Environment is studying an old private landfill near Westminster to determine whether to recommend it for the federal Superfund cleanup list.Carroll's commissioners are thinking about cleaning up the old Kate Wagner landfill before the Environmental Protection Agency might order them to do it. The commissioners have asked the staff to evaluate whether a voluntary cleanup would cost less than one done under federal supervision."We have kept in the backs of our minds" the chance that the old landfill could become a Superfund site, said Commissioner Elmer Lippy.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
The Environmental Protection Agency is expected to announce today that it is adding the Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay to its Superfund list of the nation's cleanup priorities. The listing, which has been expected since the EPA recommended adding the site to Superfund last September, will ensure the yard undergoes a thorough study to determine the scope of the contamination, which dates to World War II. The 113-year-old Curtis Bay yard is in northern Anne Arundel County, six miles southeast of downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | December 11, 1990
JACKSONVILLE, Ark. -- When the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency began its Superfund program on Dec. 11, 1980, amid a growing national fear of chemical hazards, it promised to protect public health and the environment from toxic waste.Now the $15.2 billion program is 10 years old, and it has completely cleaned up only 63 toxic sites. There are 1,187 more names on its "national priorities" list of cleanup sites, and final cost estimates range from $32 billion to $80 billion.Its critics say the Superfund program is bogged down in a bureaucratic swamp.
NEWS
May 8, 1999
The Brandywine Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office, a former military hazardous waste storage site in southern Prince George's County, has been added to the federal Superfund list of contaminated sites, the Environmental Protection Agency announced yesterday.The Air Force has been working since 1988 to clean up the 8-acre site in Andrews, upstream of Mattawoman Creek, a prime recreational fishing spot. From at least the 1950s through the 1980s, Defense Department agencies stored electrical equipment and hazardous chemicals there.
NEWS
By Staff Report | May 9, 1993
A Harford County citizens' group has been awarded two federal grants totaling $100,000 for the study of Superfund waste-disposal sites at Aberdeen Proving Ground.Helen Richick, executive director of the newly formed Aberdeen Proving Ground Superfund Citizens Coalition, said last week that the grants would be used to hire experts.Those experts, she said, would help the citizens interpret environmental data concerning the waste-disposal sites.The two Superfund dump sites at issue are the proving ground's Michaelsville landfill and the Edgewood area, site of decades of research on chemical warfare.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 13, 2012
After years of investigation and some limited cleanup, an old Dundalk area dumping ground containing toxic wastes is due for federal attention now. The Environmental Protection Agency announced today (3/13) that it is adding the Sauer Dump to the National Priorities List, also known as Superfund , because the soil and wetland sediment on the 2.5-acre site contain high concentrations of lead, PCBs and other hazardous chemicals. The partly wooded tract on Back River was originally marshland that was filled in by a past owner, according to EPA. Toxic substances were deposited there while it operated as a dump from the 1960s through the 1980s. A number of homes are nearby.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | June 7, 2011
There can be no cuter way to cut your grocery bill than "picking up pawpaws, put 'em in a basket. " Unless, perhaps, you're collecting that wild produce on the banks of a sewage leak. I have a story on urban foraging in The Sun this week. "The City That Breeds," a blog devoted to "the dumber side of Baltimore," linked to it under this inspired headline: " Urban Foraging in Baltimore: or, Hey, this Superfundberry tastes great! " "Look, people, I’m no fascist, hippy-killing, factory-farm loving capitalist, but I’ve seen the quasi-legal things Baltimoreans routinely throw on the ground," the blogger writes.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2010
The Environmental Protection Agency proposed Tuesday taking over cleanup of a former fireworks and munitions plant near Elkton in Cecil County because of extensive groundwater contamination there. The agency announced it was proposing the Dwyer property, as the 73-acre tract is known, for inclusion on the Superfund National Priorities List, a compendium of the most polluted sites in the nation. The abandoned and overgrown property has been under investigation by the Maryland Department of the Environment since 1989.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2010
Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin is calling for a rapid investigation and expanded cleanup at Fort Detrick in Frederick amid fresh questions over the testing and storage of the notorious herbicide blend Agent Orange there decades ago. Cardin wants the Army and the Environmental Protection Agency to reach an agreement by December that would allow more federal money and expertise to come to the base, where dangerous chemicals were maintained for years and...
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | December 24, 2008
The state attorney general has filed a lawsuit in federal court against the Army, alleging that the military branch has failed to abide by a cleanup order for groundwater and soil contamination at Fort Meade. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler filed in August a notice of intent to sue the Army if the site was not cleaned up within 90 days. The lawsuit alleges that the Army did not enforce an Environmental Protection Agency order to perform specific actions and produce a timeline for cleanup.
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,Sun Reporter | July 8, 2007
It has been decades since Charles S. Key Jr. has seen the Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay, but he still shudders when thinking of his first job there. Key was assigned in 1976 to work with the "major renovation" crew, gutting and rebuilding ships on and near the docks. He did everything from sweeping to moving salvage, he said. "The environment itself was just horrible, and really, really nasty," said Key, 52. "I'd come back to my room after work and my uniform would just be covered with rust and grease and who knows what else."
NEWS
November 20, 1995
TAXES ON BUSINESS that finance the Superfund toxic dump cleanup program to the tune of $1.5 billion a year are in double jeopardy, as legislators jostle for position to reform the 15-year-old effort.One threat is to divert Superfund taxes to offset revenue losses from proposed tax breaks. Some $3 billion was used this way in the past, so it is a familiar, handy recourse for Congress.The second threat to Superfund, which assuredly is in need of reform, is that the program's taxation authority ends this year.
NEWS
By Michael Martinez and Michael Martinez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 22, 2006
BUTTE, Mont. -- This was once "the Richest Hill on Earth." Home to vast mineral wealth, Butte was a storied mining town, providing one-third of the nation's copper for the dawning electric age more than a century ago. Today, that hill has a hole, a toxic abyss framed by a gash where the land was. The pit, 1 by 1 1/2 miles, is the center of the nation's largest string of Superfund sites, stretching 140 miles mostly along waterways, local officials say....
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2004
The Coast Guard Yard is a Superfund site, but that hasn't stopped residents around Curtis Bay from declaring the Pasadena shipyard a good neighbor. In the two years since the 104-year-old yard landed on the Environmental Protection Agency's list of the nation's most hazardous sites, environmental engineers have been inviting the neighbors over to show them old burn pits, salvage lots and dry dock sediment. Now, community activists are hoping the Coast Guard's example will encourage other companies around Curtis Bay to share information on pollution at their properties and to work with regulators on cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.
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