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By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | April 30, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Bill Clinton courted congressional Democrats yesterday and wound up on a political blind date, one that was a little awkward but still worth the effort.The Arkansas governor, who has criticized Washington and the perks and privileges of Congress in his campaign, wooed and won the support of an additional 31 lawmakers, including Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, for a total of 123 of the 275 congressional "superdelegates" who will attend the July convention.But the Democratic outsider came "inside" to Capitol Hill not really knowing what to expect wile insisting he was still the "agent for change."
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NEWS
By David Nitkin and Matthew Hay Brown and David Nitkin and Matthew Hay Brown,SUN REPORTERS | June 2, 2008
Decision day looms this week for undeclared superdelegates from Maryland and other states, whose fence-straddling could end soon and help close out the protracted Democratic selection process. Final presidential primaries will be held tomorrow in South Dakota and Montana, and pressure is building for remaining superdelegates to announce their choice of a candidate. Many are expected do so within hours or days, effectively delivering the Democratic nomination to Sen. Barack Obama. In Maryland, that means that several high-ranking political officials, including Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin, could finally make their intentions known.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 9, 2008
In the great hunt for superdelegates, there is no better place to look than the floor of the U.S. House or Representatives, and Sen. Barack Obama dived into a sea of them yesterday. Obama, who worked the chamber for more than 45 minutes and even got some handshakes from Republicans, insisted that he had just stopped by to say hello, update his supporters and answer questions for any fellow Democrats who remain undecided. "What do you think, I was going after superdelegates?" Obama joked after leaving the chamber.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | May 29, 2008
WASHINGTON - Hillary Clinton's campaign tried again yesterday to persuade Democrats, especially those on the party's rules committee, that she's their strongest candidate this fall, while her rival Barack Obama talked compromise and calm. Clinton's campaign sent a letter to the party's uncommitted superdelegates, who may have the final say on the nominee, telling them, "When you look at her wins in the important swing states and her strength against McCain in head-to-head matchups, there's no question that Hillary is the strongest candidate."
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,[Sun reporter] | February 17, 2008
Washington -- Being a superdelegate to this year's Democratic National Convention in Denver may not be so spectacular. In the past, the high-ranking elected officials and party officers, free to vote for whomever they wanted at the convention, were most notable for snagging invitations to the best receptions or securing prime seats on the floor. But it now looks as if the votes of 796 superdelegates may determine whether Barack Obama or Hillary Clinton becomes the party's standard bearer.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF | March 16, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Barack Obama blew Hillary Clinton away in last month's Mid-Atlantic primary. Nearly half of Obama's delegate lead over Clinton can be traced to his landslide victories in Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia. But the region's superdelegates are in a different camp. Those who have made endorsements favor Clinton over Obama in each of the jurisdictions that held primaries that day. In Maryland, a state she lost by 23 percentage points, Clinton has twice as many superdelegate backers, 10 to Obama's five.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Matthew Hay Brown and David Nitkin and Matthew Hay Brown,SUN REPORTERS | June 2, 2008
Decision day looms this week for undeclared superdelegates from Maryland and other states, whose fence-straddling could end soon and help close out the protracted Democratic selection process. Final presidential primaries will be held tomorrow in South Dakota and Montana, and pressure is building for remaining superdelegates to announce their choice of a candidate. Many are expected do so within hours or days, effectively delivering the Democratic nomination to Sen. Barack Obama. In Maryland, that means that several high-ranking political officials, including Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin, could finally make their intentions known.
NEWS
By Paul West and David Nitkin and Paul West and David Nitkin,Sun reporters | May 6, 2008
WASHINGTON -- On the eve of primaries in North Carolina and Indiana, Barack Obama angled for an advantage on a second front yesterday, picking up pledges from two party leaders in Maryland to pull nearly even with Hillary Clinton in the race for superdelegates. The timing of the announcement from Maryland Democratic Party Chairman Michael Cryor and Vice Chairman Lauren D. Glover reflected an effort by the Obama campaign to move the presidential nomination fight closer to an end - something they and the Clinton campaign acknowledge won't come through votes in primary states alone.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | February 20, 2008
Friends and relatives keep asking me lately: Can you please explain what the heck a superdelegate is? It's time for a primer. Let's start by distinguishing between the regular delegates won during state primaries and caucuses, who number just over 3,200, and these nearly 800 superdelegates, who are party leaders and elected officials. I rounded these figures on purpose: With a bit of back-of-the-napkin math, we see that superdelegates account for about one-fifth of all delegates. Because a candidate needs only a majority of the 4,000 or so delegates - 2,025, to be exact - superdelegate votes could, in theory, put a candidate two-fifths of the way toward the nomination without him or her winning any delegates in state primaries and caucuses.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | April 4, 2008
Gov. Martin O'Malley isn't wavering from his support for Sen. Hillary Clinton, but he's not toeing the party line on how superdelegates should vote or on the idea of her fighting all the way to the Democratic National Convention. In an interview yesterday with The Sun's editorial board, O'Malley - one of the first governors to endorse Clinton's bid for president - said he agrees with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that it would be dangerous for superdelegates to overturn the popular vote of Democratic primary voters.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 9, 2008
In the great hunt for superdelegates, there is no better place to look than the floor of the U.S. House or Representatives, and Sen. Barack Obama dived into a sea of them yesterday. Obama, who worked the chamber for more than 45 minutes and even got some handshakes from Republicans, insisted that he had just stopped by to say hello, update his supporters and answer questions for any fellow Democrats who remain undecided. "What do you think, I was going after superdelegates?" Obama joked after leaving the chamber.
NEWS
By Paul West and David Nitkin and Paul West and David Nitkin,Sun reporters | May 6, 2008
WASHINGTON -- On the eve of primaries in North Carolina and Indiana, Barack Obama angled for an advantage on a second front yesterday, picking up pledges from two party leaders in Maryland to pull nearly even with Hillary Clinton in the race for superdelegates. The timing of the announcement from Maryland Democratic Party Chairman Michael Cryor and Vice Chairman Lauren D. Glover reflected an effort by the Obama campaign to move the presidential nomination fight closer to an end - something they and the Clinton campaign acknowledge won't come through votes in primary states alone.
NEWS
By Tom De Luca | April 30, 2008
Sen. Hillary Clinton's win in Pennsylvania's Democratic primary underscores the need for the Democratic Party to bring the nomination battle to a swift and fair conclusion as soon as possible. The best way to do that is to move the Democratic nominating convention from the end of August to the end of June. Why? When Democrats vote in Indiana and North Carolina on Tuesday, they will probably render a split decision, with Sen. Barack Obama handily winning in the South and Mrs. Clinton eking out an industrial Midwest victory.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF | April 27, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The fight for the Democratic presidential nomination may come down to a question: Would Barack Obama or Hillary Clinton be the stronger candidate in November? "What you have to ask yourself is who you believe would be the better nominee to go toe-to-toe against John McCain," Clinton said after beating Obama in Pennsylvania last week. Clinton can't win the most delegates in the primaries, so she is framing the choice for the party's superdelegates - who will likely settle the nomination - around that question.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Matthew Hay Brown and David Nitkin and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporters | April 24, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Hillary Clinton's Pennsylvania victory has done little to simplify the challenge facing Maryland super-delegates who must decide when and how to step in and pick a Democratic nominee. A recognition is emerging, interviews show, that the super-delegates who have yet to announce a presidential choice will likely wait until the primary season ends in early June. Those reached yesterday said they would likely declare their support for Clinton or Barack Obama before a July 1 deadline set informally by Democratic National Committee Chairman Howard Dean.
NEWS
By Michael Finnegan and Dan Morain and Michael Finnegan and Dan Morain,Los Angeles Times | April 4, 2008
Hillary Clinton's financial troubles returned to the forefront of the Democrats' White House marathon yesterday as Barack Obama reported raising $40 million last month - double what the New York senator collected. The New York senator's $20 million take would be staggering in any other race. But she faces a rival who has shattered fundraising records, and this latest benchmark highlights Clinton's broader difficulties in catching up to Senator Obama of Illinois in the protracted fight for the Democratic presidential nomination.
NEWS
February 14, 2008
The race between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton has raised voter interest and turnout to levels unmatched in recent years. But for all the hoopla and ballots cast in Maryland and elsewhere, the Democrats' presidential nominee could well be chosen by a group of political insiders in a closed-door room at the national convention this summer. Here's a bit of advice to the 796 superdelegates: Make a solemn public promise to vote the way the people back home did. That promise would ensure voter confidence in the process, and not leave them shortchanged, as many feel they were after the 2000 election.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | January 27, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin's telephone began ringing months ago. On the line: representatives of the Democratic presidential contenders soliciting advice on Maryland politics, asking about lessons learned from his 2006 Senate race or just checking in again to gauge his latest thoughts on the campaign. But the callers are after more than his wisdom. As a superdelegate to the Democratic National Convention, Cardin will not be bound by the results of next month's Maryland primary election when he casts his vote in Denver this summer, but may back whichever candidate he chooses.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | April 4, 2008
Gov. Martin O'Malley isn't wavering from his support for Sen. Hillary Clinton, but he's not toeing the party line on how superdelegates should vote or on the idea of her fighting all the way to the Democratic National Convention. In an interview yesterday with The Sun's editorial board, O'Malley - one of the first governors to endorse Clinton's bid for president - said he agrees with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that it would be dangerous for superdelegates to overturn the popular vote of Democratic primary voters.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF | March 16, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Barack Obama blew Hillary Clinton away in last month's Mid-Atlantic primary. Nearly half of Obama's delegate lead over Clinton can be traced to his landslide victories in Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia. But the region's superdelegates are in a different camp. Those who have made endorsements favor Clinton over Obama in each of the jurisdictions that held primaries that day. In Maryland, a state she lost by 23 percentage points, Clinton has twice as many superdelegate backers, 10 to Obama's five.
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