Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSupercomputer
IN THE NEWS

Supercomputer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 22, 1992
Economic good news is a scarce commodity in Annapolis these days, but the latest addition to the University of Maryland's research park in Bowie gives state officials reasons to cheer. If all goes as planned, the U.S. Census Bureau will install a supercomputer on a 446-acre tract in eastern Prince George's County, a move that takes the state a big step closer toward creating an information technology hub at UM's Bowie park.The import of this deal goes beyond the 100 jobs it is expected to generate.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Researchers at the University of Maryland, College Park need more than a laptop, a room of standard servers or even a supercomputer dubbed Deepthought to tackle research exploring Saturn's rings, the earliest galaxies, fire dynamics and drug-resistant bacteria. Instead, the university has launched a $4.2 million machine, Deepthought2, capable of processing 300 trillion calculations each second. University officials expect that will rank it among the 10 most powerful owned by public universities.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Researchers at the University of Maryland, College Park need more than a laptop, a room of standard servers or even a supercomputer dubbed Deepthought to tackle research exploring Saturn's rings, the earliest galaxies, fire dynamics and drug-resistant bacteria. Instead, the university has launched a $4.2 million machine, Deepthought2, capable of processing 300 trillion calculations each second. University officials expect that will rank it among the 10 most powerful owned by public universities.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
In baseball, it turns out, making a perfect schedule can be as elusive as throwing a perfect game. There are a lot of rules, starting with the basics: For each major league team, 81 games must be on the road and 81 at home, with 13 home weekend series and 19 games against divisional opponents. With any wiggle room left, a team such as the Orioles might ask for a home game on Father's Day or an away game when a concert is scheduled at nearby M&T Bank Stadium. But any special request from one team can lead to a lot of eraser smudges for the rest.
NEWS
By Artika Rangan and Artika Rangan,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2004
The Army's new Stryker supercomputer will allow researchers at Aberdeen Proving Ground to perform detailed test simulations of weaponry twice as fast as they can now, officials said. The supercomputer, built by International Business Machines Corp. of Armonk, N.Y., is to be installed next month at the Army Research Laboratory's Major Shared Resource Center, the Army and IBM announced yesterday. The Department of Defense has supercomputing needs there that are related to basic science, weapons design and chemical research.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 6, 1996
Seymour R. Cray, a computer industry pioneer and father of the supercomputer, died yesterday at a hospital near his home in Colorado Springs. He was 71, and had suffered severe head injuries in an automobile crash two weeks ago.As a young electrical engineer at Control Data Corp. in the late 1950s, Mr. Cray led the design of the world's first transistor-based computer. He developed a string of supercomputing machines known for their elegance and simplicity, but mostly for their speed.Used first by military weapons designers and in intelligence agencies, Mr. Cray's earliest supercomputers, notably the Control Data 6600, 7600 and the Cray 1, permitted researchers to simulate nuclear weapons explosions and crack enemy codes.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 13, 1990
A consortium of 14 U.S. research institutions led by the California Institute of Technology is scheduled to announce today that it will purchase a custom-designed supercomputer from Intel Corp. to help solve a series of scientific "grand challenges."The project, known as the Concurrent Supercomputing Consortium, is one of the most significant endorsements to date of a style of computing known as parallel processing, which chains together many processors and breaks up problems to solve them more quickly.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | December 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- University of Maryland officials say they have moved a step closer to their goal of sharing a new supercomputer with the U.S. Bureau of the Census.A Census spokeswoman, however, isn't so sure. She says the supercomputer remains something of a "dream."University officials got their hopes up when the state Board of Public Works approved a $1.5 million grant yesterday toward the development of what they envision as a federal-state supercomputer center in Bowie.University officials predicted in a news release that the "Census building should be ready and the supercomputer installed by early 1994."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In a good-will gesture toward China, the Clinton administration has agreed to sell it a sophisticated $8 million supercomputer, senior administration officials said yesterday.The decision is part of the administration's strategy to embrace, rather than isolate, China despite disagreements over human rights, weapons proliferation and trade. The Clinton administration is determined to grab an ever-larger share of China's market, the fastest growing in the world, and reduce a trade deficit that could exceed that with Japan by the end of the decade.
NEWS
By Luther Young | June 7, 1991
One of the fastest and most powerful supercomputers in Maryland now belongs to Morgan State University, thanks to a NASA program to establish a supercomputing network among black universities.The 2-year-old, $2.5 million ETA-10 supercomputer was donated to Morgan on May 10 by the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, and it is to be installed at the university's new engineering center for operation beginning this fall."It's more than a leap forward for us; it's a catapult," said George Peterson, assistant vice president for academic affairs, expressing school officials' elation about the acquisition.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | July 22, 2007
Some Boy Scouts who toured City Hall to earn merit badges nearly got an education in the birds and the bees. Or, more accurately, a lesson in negotiating low, low prices for illegal birds-and-bees activity on The Block. City Council Vice President Bobby Curran escorted the group to a Liquor Board hearing the other day, when it was taking up the matter of alleged sex-for-money offers at two strip clubs. Vice detectives read aloud from police reports describing their encounters with dancers.
NEWS
By Artika Rangan and Artika Rangan,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2004
The Army's new Stryker supercomputer will allow researchers at Aberdeen Proving Ground to perform detailed test simulations of weaponry twice as fast as they can now, officials said. The supercomputer, built by International Business Machines Corp. of Armonk, N.Y., is to be installed next month at the Army Research Laboratory's Major Shared Resource Center, the Army and IBM announced yesterday. The Department of Defense has supercomputing needs there that are related to basic science, weapons design and chemical research.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert S. Boyd and Robert S. Boyd,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 25, 2003
WASHINGTON - First came the Internet in the late 1960s, electronically linking computers around the world. The '90s brought the World Wide Web, making it possible to exchange words, pictures, music, videos and information of every sort. Now comes the "Grid," a third wave in the evolution of the cyberworld that promises to give users access to unprecedented computing power, services and data, no matter where they are located. Ultimately, supporters say, the Grid will be like having a supercomputer at your fingertips.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Kaye and Ken Kaye,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2003
It's one of the most powerful computers in the world, capable of 450 billion calculations per second. At 6,000 square feet, it's so big, it dominates a room the size of basketball court. It's so high-performance, it helps forecast weather for the entire United States, from snow to tropical storms. But can the $224 million IBM supercomputer, unveiled by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Maryland on Friday, tell you with any certainty whether it will rain on your house today?
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2002
IBM Corp. has won a government contract to build two supercomputers whose speed, company officials say, could for the first time approach the theoretical raw processing power of the human brain. The $290 million contract between IBM and the Department of Energy was expected to be made public today at Supercomputing 2002, the annual high-performance computing conference being held this week in downtown Baltimore. Fast and even faster The first machine, dubbed ASCI Purple, will be capable of performing 100 trillion calculations per second when it's delivered in 2004, the company said.
NEWS
By Stephen Bryen | January 15, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush has approved another liberalization of supercomputer export controls. Unless reversed, the decision will release very powerful supercomputers that can be sold to countries such as China without any export license. Just as the U.S. national security establishment is one of the main domestic consumers of supercomputers, China's military and intelligence organizations are scooping up American-made supercomputers for programs that directly target the United States.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 13, 1993
Thinking Machines Corp., the supercomputer maker based in Cambridge, Mass., will sign a three-year, $16 million contract today with the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington to deliver an upgrade to the lab's existing CM-5 supercomputer system.The government research facility will use the huge parallel processing system to create more accurate weather forecasts, to research fluid dynamics in the building of aircraft and submarines, and to study ocean currents, said Danny Hillis, Thinking Machine's founding scientist.
BUSINESS
By San Francisco Chronicle | November 18, 1991
Intel Corp. today was to unveil its contender as the world's fastest computer. But the hardware may be upstaged by software that could significantly broaden the use of such powerful systems.The Santa Clara, Calif.-based company says its new Paragon XP/S system can perform from 5 billion to 300 billion operations per second, for a price ranging from less than $2 million to $55 million.That's a tenfold increase for Intel, and comparable to the CM-5 system announced by arch-rival Thinking Machines Corp.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 1, 2001
LONDON - It's not enough that Vladimir Kramnik was recognized as a genius at 4, was thumping chess grandmasters at 10 and won a world chess championship last year by destroying his mentor, Garry Kasparov. Now, only 26, he's defending humanity. Kramnik is preparing for the ultimate confrontation across a chess board, taking on a computer named Deep Fritz in an eight-game series in Bahrain beginning Oct. 12. "The Brains in Bahrain" is the latest installment of man vs. machine in chess, a battle of genius and computer chips, inspiration and software.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew J. Glass and Andrew J. Glass,COX NEWS SERVICE | July 10, 2000
IBM has built the first supercomputer that, scientists hope, is powerful enough to simulate the explosion of a nuclear weapon. The $110 million machine is a major step toward an era when computers will provide such benefits as vastly improved weather forecasts and individually designed medicines. The new IBM computer, called ASCI White, weighs 106 tons and occupies an area the size of two basketball courts. It would take the next four biggest computers in the world combined to equal its processing power.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.