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NEWS
August 7, 1992
The superconducting supercollider, a giant circular particle accelerator 54 miles in circumference under construction near Waxahatchie, Texas, is a classic example of the kind of "big science" project scientists hope will enable them to unlock the deepest secrets of the universe.Whether the machine will live up to its promise is uncertain, however. Even if it does, it will have done so at the cost of other research with more immediate, practical applications. Meanwhile it will have added $8 billion to an already bloated federal budget deficit, and probably much more when all its costs are taken into account.
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NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | March 5, 1994
The abrupt cut-off in funding for the $11 billion Superconducting Supercollider project last November represented a victory for congressional deficit hawks, but it left the future of particle-physics research in this country in limbo. The short-term effect has been to cede U.S. leadership on one of the cutting edges of modern science.Particle physics, as its name implies, is the branch of physical science that deals with the properties of subatomic particles and their interactions. The tools physicists use to investigate this subatomic realm are popularly known as ''atom smashers'' -- giant machines that employ powerful electromagnetic fields to accelerate elementary particles through a circular tunnel to within a fraction of the speed of light, then crash them into each other.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 25, 1993
In yesterday's editions, The Sun reported incorrectly the votes of Maryland members of the House on the killing of the superconducting supercollider research project. Voting to kill the project were Reps. Benjamin L. Cardin, Kweisi Mfume, Constance A. Morella and Albert R. Wynn. Voting to keep the project alive were Reps. Roscoe G. Bartlett, Helen D. Bentley, Wayne T. Gilchrest and Steny H. Hoyer.The Sun regrets the errors.WASHINGTON -- The superconducting supercollider smashed into fiscal and political reality yesterday when the House voted overwhelmingly to kill the $8.3 billion project as a "pure science" luxury that a nation bent on serious deficit reduction no longer can afford.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 22, 1993
The superconducting supercollider collided with reality.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau Staff writer Nelson Schwartz contributed to this article | October 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Less than two months after a wave of budget-cutting rhetoric in Congress, the Senate voted overwhelmingly yesterday to restore funds for the superconducting supercollider -- a huge science project derided opponents as exactly the kind of pork barrel spending the country can no longer afford.The rescue of the $13 billion supercollider -- the only major project cut from the budget this year by the House of Representatives -- comes at the end of an appropriations process that trimmed spending only slightly from last year.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The House pushed a stake through the heart of the $11 billion superconducting supercollider program yesterday, voting emphatically, for the second time since June and the third time in 16 months, to reject financing for the vast Texas atom-smasher.Each time, the Senate has rescued the project, which has already cost $2 billion, from the House attempts to kill it. But after yesterday's 264-159 vote on a crucial procedural vote in the House, its most important advocate in the Senate, J. Bennett Johnston, said the project appeared to be lost.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 22, 1993
The superconducting supercollider collided with reality.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | March 5, 1994
The abrupt cut-off in funding for the $11 billion Superconducting Supercollider project last November represented a victory for congressional deficit hawks, but it left the future of particle-physics research in this country in limbo. The short-term effect has been to cede U.S. leadership on one of the cutting edges of modern science.Particle physics, as its name implies, is the branch of physical science that deals with the properties of subatomic particles and their interactions. The tools physicists use to investigate this subatomic realm are popularly known as ''atom smashers'' -- giant machines that employ powerful electromagnetic fields to accelerate elementary particles through a circular tunnel to within a fraction of the speed of light, then crash them into each other.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | February 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Pledging to seek new spending cuts throughout "the entire duration of my term," President Clinton threw the fate of two multibillion-dollar technology projects into the hands of Congress yesterday and said the lawmakers were free to debate more defense reductions.Mr. Clinton, responding to increasing public and political pressure for more spending cuts, said he did not agree with those calling for the scrapping of the space station and the superconducting Supercollider, but added: "They can be debated on the floor of Congress."
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | February 17, 1993
Washington. -- If you're looking for a test of Bill Clinton's commitment to federal frugality, keep a close watch on the deepest sinkholes in Washington's research inventory, Space Station Freedom and the Superconducting Super Collider. Compared to this gold-plated duo, White House limousines and executive dining rooms are petty cash.The space station and the collider are extravagantly expensive, irrelevant to the country's economic plight and senseless drains on scarce research funds. No matter.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The House pushed a stake through the heart of the $11 billion superconducting supercollider program yesterday, voting emphatically, for the second time since June and the third time in 16 months, to reject financing for the vast Texas atom-smasher.Each time, the Senate has rescued the project, which has already cost $2 billion, from the House attempts to kill it. But after yesterday's 264-159 vote on a crucial procedural vote in the House, its most important advocate in the Senate, J. Bennett Johnston, said the project appeared to be lost.
NEWS
October 17, 1993
Tunnel to NowhereOne might get the impression from Professor Jonathan Bagger's letter (Oct. 8) that the scientific community is virtually unanimous in its support for the superconducting supercollider. This could not be further from the truth.Thousands of researchers in all fields of science, whose own modest grant proposals are repeatedly rejected for lack of funds, look on in amazement, anger and dismay as the government continues to send half a billion dollars a year digging a 53-mile tunnel to nowhere through the rock beneath the Texas desert, in the name of scientific progress.
NEWS
October 8, 1993
SupercolliderYour article Oct. 1, describing the Senate vote on the superconducting supercollider, was a shoddy piece of journalism. It was so distorted that I cannot help but wonder whether all your stories are equally off the mark.The most obvious bias was the amount of space given to opponents of the project. The article did not quote any supporters and implied that they are under the spell of special interests.It did not mention any of the legitimate reasons to support the collider, such as its benefits to Maryland or the nation.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau Staff writer Nelson Schwartz contributed to this article | October 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Less than two months after a wave of budget-cutting rhetoric in Congress, the Senate voted overwhelmingly yesterday to restore funds for the superconducting supercollider -- a huge science project derided opponents as exactly the kind of pork barrel spending the country can no longer afford.The rescue of the $13 billion supercollider -- the only major project cut from the budget this year by the House of Representatives -- comes at the end of an appropriations process that trimmed spending only slightly from last year.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 25, 1993
In yesterday's editions, The Sun reported incorrectly the votes of Maryland members of the House on the killing of the superconducting supercollider research project. Voting to kill the project were Reps. Benjamin L. Cardin, Kweisi Mfume, Constance A. Morella and Albert R. Wynn. Voting to keep the project alive were Reps. Roscoe G. Bartlett, Helen D. Bentley, Wayne T. Gilchrest and Steny H. Hoyer.The Sun regrets the errors.WASHINGTON -- The superconducting supercollider smashed into fiscal and political reality yesterday when the House voted overwhelmingly to kill the $8.3 billion project as a "pure science" luxury that a nation bent on serious deficit reduction no longer can afford.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | June 23, 1993
Choice of builder near for State Farm officesState Farm Insurance Co. is close to deciding who will get to build its 402,000-square-foot regional headquarters in Frederick, and a Virginia construction company appears to have the upper hand.State Farm spokeswoman Shari Wisnewski says Manhattan Construction Co. of Fairfax last week submitted what appears to be the low bid at $28.1 million. But the deal won't be final until State Farm's home office in Illinois goes over the seven competing bids.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | June 23, 1993
Choice of builder near for State Farm officesState Farm Insurance Co. is close to deciding who will get to build its 402,000-square-foot regional headquarters in Frederick, and a Virginia construction company appears to have the upper hand.State Farm spokeswoman Shari Wisnewski says Manhattan Construction Co. of Fairfax last week submitted what appears to be the low bid at $28.1 million. But the deal won't be final until State Farm's home office in Illinois goes over the seven competing bids.
NEWS
October 8, 1993
SupercolliderYour article Oct. 1, describing the Senate vote on the superconducting supercollider, was a shoddy piece of journalism. It was so distorted that I cannot help but wonder whether all your stories are equally off the mark.The most obvious bias was the amount of space given to opponents of the project. The article did not quote any supporters and implied that they are under the spell of special interests.It did not mention any of the legitimate reasons to support the collider, such as its benefits to Maryland or the nation.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | February 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Pledging to seek new spending cuts throughout "the entire duration of my term," President Clinton threw the fate of two multibillion-dollar technology projects into the hands of Congress yesterday and said the lawmakers were free to debate more defense reductions.Mr. Clinton, responding to increasing public and political pressure for more spending cuts, said he did not agree with those calling for the scrapping of the space station and the superconducting Supercollider, but added: "They can be debated on the floor of Congress."
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | February 17, 1993
Washington. -- If you're looking for a test of Bill Clinton's commitment to federal frugality, keep a close watch on the deepest sinkholes in Washington's research inventory, Space Station Freedom and the Superconducting Super Collider. Compared to this gold-plated duo, White House limousines and executive dining rooms are petty cash.The space station and the collider are extravagantly expensive, irrelevant to the country's economic plight and senseless drains on scarce research funds. No matter.
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