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By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2010
Developers of the long-stalled Superblock project on downtown Baltimore's west side will get more time to work on their plans if city officials extend a 2005 land sale agreement that is to expire Dec. 31. A second group, headed by the Cordish Cos., also will get additional time to solidify its plans to redevelop land just north of the Superblock, if city officials agree. Baltimore's Board of Estimates is scheduled Wednesday to consider requests from Baltimore Development Corp. to give the developers more time to move ahead with projects on the west side, where development has been delayed for years by lawsuits and disputes over historic preservation.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
A Baltimore judge ruled this week that she will not enforce her decision to dismiss a multimillion-dollar lawsuit filed by the former developers of the "Superblock" until an appellate court rules on the case. City officials expressed disappointment with the ruling, which they said could further slow development of the long-stalled project on Baltimore's west side. "It's always frustrating to me when the legal process is protracted and it prevents meaningful development in the city," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said.
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NEWS
January 18, 2011
The recent editorial "Superblock hits a snag" (Jan. 18) urging preservationists to compromise, misses the point. More than a decade ago, after the West Side was named one of America's most endangered historic sites, the General Assembly enacted legislation that ensured the historic properties in the area would be redeveloped into viable commercial district. Seven years after a developer was chosen to do so, the Superblock sits awaiting its rebirth. The current city administration took note and brought in experts from the Urban Land Institute to review what should be done.
BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
A Baltimore judge dismissed Friday a multimillion-dollar lawsuit filed by the former developers of the "Superblock" that alleged the city illegally terminated their exclusive rights to build on the property. Baltimore Circuit Judge Pamela J. White threw out the $50 million suit, saying the city properly ended its deal with Lexington Square Partners when its contract for the land expired. "The mayor is happy we can finally move forward with a key development project on the west side," said Kevin Harris, a spokesman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar | December 17, 2012
The Baltimore Development Corp. is asking the city's spending board to yet again extend a land sale agreement with the developer of the long-stalled Lexington Square “superblock” project. If approved by the Board of Estimates Wednesday, this fourth extension would give Lexington Square Partners LLC until June 30, 2013, to purchase 3.6 acres from the city for its proposed $152 million mixed-use development on the west side of downtown. The developer “believes that this extension will be the last one that is necessary in order to secure financing for the project,” according to the board's agenda.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
A Baltimore judge on Wednesday rejected an attempt by city officials to dismiss a multimillion lawsuit filed by the former developers of the so-called "Superblock. " "We're glad this ruling allows us to move this project forward," said Jason St. John, an attorney representing Lexington Square Partners, which is demanding more than $50 million after Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake canceled their exclusive rights to the west-side property. "We need to stop the delays and move this project forward," St. John said.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2011
The Maryland Historical Trust is asking the state attorney general's office for guidance on how to address concerns from preservationists who oppose a developer's plans to raze certain buildings on Baltimore's west side, including the former Read's drugstore. The request comes after a statewide preservation group, Preservation Maryland, appealed a decision by the Maryland Historical Trust to allow the developer to proceed, saying a 2001 legal agreement calls for those buildings to be preserved if at all possible.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2011
Baltimore's preservation panel intends to recommend that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake withhold approval of the $150 million Lexington Square redevelopment because it calls for the demolition of historic buildings previously targeted for preservation, including the former Read's drugstore, site of a 1955 civil rights sit-in. Members of Baltimore's Commission on Historical and Architectural Preservation also indicated Wednesday that they would start the process for adding the Read's building to the city's "special list" of historic landmarks, an action that would automatically protect it from demolition for at least six months.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge has dismissed a lawsuit by Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos that challenged the city's plans for the long-delayed Superblock project. In the decision, signed last week but announced by the state on Tuesday, Judge John Philip Miller wrote that Angelos' 120 W. Fayette Street LLLP "failed to state a claim upon which relief can be granted. " In the lawsuit, Angelos contended that the head of the Maryland Historical Trust did not have the authority to act for the trust when he approved preliminary plans for the west side redevelopment in December.
NEWS
March 28, 2011
I am not on Peter Angelos' payroll. We have at most a passing acquaintance. Other than as a skeptical and experience-hardened, cynical observer of all the State Center silliness, I'm not knowledgeable other than its obvious downsides. I'm sure its detail would drive me to distraction were I to delve into what's really afoot. I am, however, intimately familiar with the shameful Superblock fiasco and its lessons. Bryan Dunn, Kevin Macartney, Brian Morrison and Thomas Ventimiglia demonstrate they are not ("Mr.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
The city Wednesday asked for proposals from developers for about a dozen city-owned parcels in a state-designated historic district on the west side, where many blocks have lain dormant for years. The Baltimore Development Corp.'s two requests for proposals include four buildings in the middle of the 400 block of N. Howard St. and nine buildings and an open lot in an area roughly bounded by Park Avenue and Liberty, Clay and Marion streets. Responses can target individual properties or describe plans for wholesale development of the clusters, a choice city officials said they have opened in response to private sector interest in smaller-scale projects, which can be easier to finance.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | February 11, 2014
The longtime head of Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation, who oversaw its fight to protect the city's old structures for more than three decades, announced her retirement Tuesday. Kathleen Kotarba, a 1975 graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art, began her 38-year tenure in city government in 1974 and has served as CHAP's executive director since 1981. During that time, the commission named 21 of the city's 33 historic districts, identified 127 of the roughly 180 Baltimore City landmarks, restored the Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum, established a popular city tax credit for historic restoration and launched a program focused on conservation of the city's monuments, among other achievements.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
A Baltimore judge on Wednesday rejected an attempt by city officials to dismiss a multimillion lawsuit filed by the former developers of the so-called "Superblock. " "We're glad this ruling allows us to move this project forward," said Jason St. John, an attorney representing Lexington Square Partners, which is demanding more than $50 million after Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake canceled their exclusive rights to the west-side property. "We need to stop the delays and move this project forward," St. John said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
The former developers of Baltimore's long-stalled "Superblock" project have filed suit against the city, demanding more than $50 million after Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake canceled their exclusive rights to the west-side property. In a lawsuit filed Tuesday in Baltimore Circuit Court, Lexington Square Partners say they spent more than $7 million in their six-year effort to develop the site and were on the verge of securing financing to move ahead. The suit says city officials unfairly killed their deal with Baltimore.
NEWS
June 26, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's announcement this week that she won't grant developers of the long-stalled Superblock another extension of their exclusive right to build on the property acknowledged a painful truth that has been apparent for some time: Nearly a decade after the first proposals were submitted, the massive redevelopment project that was supposed to transform the west side of downtown is dead in the water and unlikely to be revived any...
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Wednesday that she intends to seek new proposals to develop the long-stalled "Superblock" before year's end. "My plan is for the [request for proposals] to be issued this fall," she said. "We're exploring ways to attract a diverse group of developers when it's offered for redevelopment. " Rawlings-Blake declined this week to grant another extension to the developers of the project on the city's west side, putting the future of the ambitious plan in jeopardy.
NEWS
January 18, 2011
The lunch counter where civil rights protesters engaged in a sit-in to demand integration is long gone, the store has been closed for years, and the building has fallen into disrepair. But the old Read's drugstore at the corner of Howard and Lexington streets made news recently when it appeared that its history as a key site in Baltimore's civil rights struggle — albeit one that had received little public attention — would derail the long-delayed, multimillion-dollar "Superblock" redevelopment that has long been viewed as a catalyst for downtown Baltimore's west side.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2011
Baltimore's Board of Estimates on Wednesday approved a four-month extension of a land sale agreement between the city and developers of the Superblock, a West Side redevelopment project long tangled in legal challenges. The five members of the spending board unanimously approved extending the Dec. 31 termination date on the agreement with Lexington Square Partners LLC through April 30, with the possibility of an additional eight months depending on progress. Johns Hopkins, president of Baltimore Heritage, entered a formal protest over the board's decision to extend the deadline and keep the project alive.
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